Hot answers tagged

61

There does appear to be fairly solid research backing this claim. A summary page from UCLA: Sleep and Teens One change in the body during puberty is closely related to how you sleep. There is a shift in the timing of your circadian rhythms. Before puberty, your body makes you sleepy around 8:00 or 9:00 pm. When puberty begins, this rhythm shifts a couple ...


37

On the headline question Has “the destruction of the space shuttle Challenger… been linked to insufficient sleep” There probably was a link, as it was important enough included in the Rogers report. As was reported by NASA: The Rogers Commission Human Factors Findings stated, "The willingness of NASA employees in general to work excessive hours, while ...


35

Even though sleep science has only existed for a few decades it doesn't seem likely to be possible Almost every experiment conducted in humans, resulted in psychotic symptoms like paranoia, hallucinations, etc after several days. The known record of time without sleep is 11 days, 24 minutes. There might be some who claim that they don't sleep, but it was ...


27

There are actually two parts that need to be covered when addressing this question. One part pertains to the question if we even need 8 hours of sleep? Another part, if we need 8 hours of sleep, is there a need for them to be consecutive? I want to split up this question, because when people talk about different types of sleep patterns, like polyphasic ...


25

The evidence is quite overwhelming. See, for example, the Sleep Research section on my website. There, among other items, you will find a direct link to my article, "Sleep We Have Lost," in which I first published this discovery. there is every reason to believe that segmented sleep, such as many wild animals still exhibit, had long been the natural ...


22

I am going to convert my comments to an answer, since this seems to be a bit of a tough nut to crack. First of all, the CNN article links to an article on Health.com which states the same thing. The only reference is that a Dr. Roshini Rajapaksa makes this assertion. There is no links or discussion of any studies or even any particular expertise in this. ...


21

No. Co-sleeping is unsafe, particularly when compared to placing a child into a suitable cot / crib. Most of this risk comes from the bed and bedding not being suitable for infants, but suffocation by overlying is also a significant risk. The only safe place for an infant to sleep is on its back in a crib/bed that meets relevant standards. A ...


20

This article may be enlightening. The most accurate method of measuring someone's sleep cycle is to use a bunch of electrodes attached to a person's head - I did this once. It's difficult to sleep this way because the gunk gets in your hair and restricts your movement in the night. However, measuring a person's movement during sleep - which is what all of ...


16

Short version: The quoted study is poor quality, and is not sufficient to accept the claims. Earthing in general is pseudo-scientific nonsense. Longer Version: Flawed Journal The study that supports the claims by Stevenson is The Biologic Effects of Grounding the Human Body During Sleep as Measured by Cortisol Levels and Subjective Reporting of Sleep, ...


15

From Is Sleep Essential? (2008): It has been argued that the assumption that sleep is universal is based on poor evidence 7). Summary of some of the “difficult” cases: The bullfrog is often promoted as an example of an animal that does not sleep. There is, however, only one study on this topic, published in 1967 23). This report ...


14

Maybe. According to this study, patients with congestive heart failure tend to unconsciously avoid sleeping on their left side, whereas healthy patients don't display this avoidance. The reason for this avoidance is unknown, though the paper offers several lines of speculation, ranging from discomfort to various forms of cardiac impairment. As far as I ...


14

Yes micro-sleep (or microsleep) is a real phenomenon that is well documented in both the mainstream and scientific literature and can be verified by EEG. There is also evidence to support that people are sometimes not aware when this happens. With regards to the phenomenon itself, the BBC said that, Of 1,000 drivers it interviewed, 45% of men admitted ...


13

Spiny Dogfish Florida Museum of Natural History: It was once believed that all sharks had to swim constantly in order to breathe and could not sleep for more than a few minutes at a time. Oxygen-rich water flows through the gills during movement allowing the shark to breathe. While some species of sharks do need to swim constantly, this is ...


13

Here is another list of studies, crosschecked with a PubMed search that yielded only a few relevant hits (see this for example). In review, the results appear mixed and sometimes contradictory. The sample sizes are small and lack controls. The field of chiropractics where such research is often published itself borders on being a pseudo-science. In ...


13

There are no known relations between mattress cost and sleep quality. In fact, there are no standards to recommend a particular bedding system over another. No benchmark standards presently exist for recommending bedding systems, whether for the purpose of alleviating pain-related sleep disturbance, stress, or for the purpose of enhancing sleep quality. ...


13

Sleeping positions on the right or left might have an influence on digestion if the digestive problems are related to gastroesophageal reflux per research mentioned below. Per Katz LC et.al.'s research in 1994 into whether there is a difference in the amount of gastroesophageal reflux when lying with the right versus the left side down, 'the direct ...


13

Seeing this question pop up again, I want to share something. I did not write an answer before because I did not want to dig up an old question without a conclusive answer. While the claim is reported in Quartz, it is actually somebody else's. Tara Swart's ("a senior lecturer at MIT specializing in sleep and the brain," according to Quartz). So in addition ...


13

Short version: A short-sleep human phenotype has been described in the literature. However, the reported sleep times I found in the scientific literature for those people are around 6h / day vs. 8h for controls, so nowhere near 2 h. About Tesla: The Wiki page has a paragraph on his sleeping habits where biographies are cited that he claimed to never ...


11

In short, potentially yes, at least in mice: The authors used gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify respiratory irritants (e.g., styrene, isopropylbenzene, limonene) in the emissions of one of the polyurethane foam mattresses. Some mattresses emitted mixtures of volatile chemicals that had the potential to cause respiratory-tract irritation and ...


11

In Conversations on Consciousness by Susan Blackmore (ISBN 978-0-19-280623-9), on page 140, Stephen LaBerge references a study he did to provide evidence of lucid dreaming. He knew that observed eye movement in REM state did sometimes correspond with reported subjective gaze direction in regular dreams. He'd also already mastered techniques to become lucid ...


11

EDIT DUE TO QUESTION EDIT: Well, how "common" are solo sailors on marathon journeys? I did a quick search, and wikipedia gave me a list of 49 names. Assuming that this list is most likely incomplete, we still have a very small sample size. Again, I think there are more Navy SEALS than there are solo sailors. The SEALS display this as a common technique ...


11

The website you quote makes it sound like the subconsciousness is a little man in your brain, with a book of knowledge, reviewing all the material during the night and "strengthening knowledge without your influence". Although the website doesn't properly support the idea about how post-training sleep might benefit memory consolidation, it does convey some "...


11

Make your own conclusion from the sources mentioned This is evidence showing that using face-to-screen electronics before going to bed could harm your sleep. For instance, this study, published in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes found that smartphone use after 9 p.m. was associated with decreased sleep quantity at night. ...


11

Yes, it could be done by the Buddhist monks following the Vinaya rules [1]. Perhaps one of the best-known training rules of the bhikkhu concerns his not eating between midday and dawn [...] Fasting in Buddhism is not what most people think, that is, literally surviving without any food, water and sleep for many consecutive days. So the headline must have ...


11

Lithium batteries are based on a chemistry that can fail in combustive fashion. To avoid this, elaborate safeguards are in place to avoid those exact failure modes. A defective battery can still self-ignite, though. This can happen in a variety of ways. The electronics avoiding overcharging could be damaged. The battery could be physically damaged. There ...


10

Skeptoid episode #611 covers this claim and its foundation, specifically that static electricity builds up throughout the day. This is false. Fortunately, Skeptoid even covers the bedding aspect: There is a final nail in the coffin of earthing. The entire reason for its practice claimed by its advocates — that your shoes keep you electrically insulated ...


9

Well, this is hardly definitive; however, I have not been able to find any quote that was attributed to Einstein concerning him sleeping 10-11 hours a day. Also, I have found no reference to it that gives any sort of citation as to where they arrived at that information. One example of this sort of behavior is the book Power Sleep. While it makes the ...


9

The Wikipedia article on polyphasic sleep gives some interesting pointers such as this study for the NASA: NASA, in cooperation with the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, has funded research on napping. Despite NASA recommendations that astronauts sleep 8 hours a day when in space, they usually have trouble sleeping 8 hours at a stretch, ...


9

I think it's worth providing an alternative viewpoint to this question. Outside of the Western, developed world co-sleeping is the standard way for parents to sleep with young children, not the exception. This article's fonts makes me want to burn my eyes out, but the final paragraph has a very interesting graphic created from NIMH data: In China, where I ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible