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61

There does appear to be fairly solid research backing this claim. A summary page from UCLA: Sleep and Teens One change in the body during puberty is closely related to how you sleep. There is a shift in the timing of your circadian rhythms. Before puberty, your body makes you sleepy around 8:00 or 9:00 pm. When puberty begins, this rhythm shifts a couple ...


58

This is the study itself if you want to read it. Yes it is a study in mice. It is evidence but not proof that blue filters are counter-productive, at least according to the authors of this single, peer-reviewed study. This is a fairly typical example of media fixating on a single study and making it out to a bigger deal than it actually is. More research is ...


37

On the headline question Has “the destruction of the space shuttle Challenger… been linked to insufficient sleep” There probably was a link, as it was important enough included in the Rogers report. As was reported by NASA: The Rogers Commission Human Factors Findings stated, "The willingness of NASA employees in general to work excessive hours, while ...


34

Even though sleep science has only existed for a few decades it doesn't seem likely to be possible Almost every experiment conducted in humans, resulted in psychotic symptoms like paranoia, hallucinations, etc after several days. The known record of time without sleep is 11 days, 24 minutes. There might be some who claim that they don't sleep, but it was ...


17

Short version: The quoted study is poor quality, and is not sufficient to accept the claims. Earthing in general is pseudo-scientific nonsense. Longer Version: Flawed Journal The study that supports the claims by Stevenson is The Biologic Effects of Grounding the Human Body During Sleep as Measured by Cortisol Levels and Subjective Reporting of Sleep, ...


14

Maybe. According to this study, patients with congestive heart failure tend to unconsciously avoid sleeping on their left side, whereas healthy patients don't display this avoidance. The reason for this avoidance is unknown, though the paper offers several lines of speculation, ranging from discomfort to various forms of cardiac impairment. As far as I ...


14

Yes micro-sleep (or microsleep) is a real phenomenon that is well documented in both the mainstream and scientific literature and can be verified by EEG. There is also evidence to support that people are sometimes not aware when this happens. With regards to the phenomenon itself, the BBC said that, Of 1,000 drivers it interviewed, 45% of men admitted ...


13

There are no known relations between mattress cost and sleep quality. In fact, there are no standards to recommend a particular bedding system over another. No benchmark standards presently exist for recommending bedding systems, whether for the purpose of alleviating pain-related sleep disturbance, stress, or for the purpose of enhancing sleep quality. ...


13

Sleeping positions on the right or left might have an influence on digestion if the digestive problems are related to gastroesophageal reflux per research mentioned below. Per Katz LC et.al.'s research in 1994 into whether there is a difference in the amount of gastroesophageal reflux when lying with the right versus the left side down, 'the direct ...


13

Seeing this question pop up again, I want to share something. I did not write an answer before because I did not want to dig up an old question without a conclusive answer. While the claim is reported in Quartz, it is actually somebody else's. Tara Swart's ("a senior lecturer at MIT specializing in sleep and the brain," according to Quartz). So in addition ...


13

Short version: A short-sleep human phenotype has been described in the literature. However, the reported sleep times I found in the scientific literature for those people are around 6h / day vs. 8h for controls, so nowhere near 2 h. About Tesla: The Wiki page has a paragraph on his sleeping habits where biographies are cited that he claimed to never ...


11

Make your own conclusion from the sources mentioned This is evidence showing that using face-to-screen electronics before going to bed could harm your sleep. For instance, this study, published in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes found that smartphone use after 9 p.m. was associated with decreased sleep quantity at night. ...


11

Lithium batteries are based on a chemistry that can fail in combustive fashion. To avoid this, elaborate safeguards are in place to avoid those exact failure modes. A defective battery can still self-ignite, though. This can happen in a variety of ways. The electronics avoiding overcharging could be damaged. The battery could be physically damaged. There ...


10

There are several papers which support this claim: 420 participants performed two self-report inventories assessing circadian type, as well as measures of intelligence from two psychometric batteries: CAM-IV and the ASVAB. The results indicate that, contrary to conventional folk wisdom, evening-types are more likely to have higher intelligence scores. ...


9

This boils down to an argument about definitions. You argue that brief awakenings during the day means an animal is not truly nocturnal. Turning that around, that would mean awakening during the night would mean an animal is not truly diurnal. (I am going to restrict the discussion to mammals only. I think the point about definitions still applies to other ...


9

The Wikipedia article on polyphasic sleep gives some interesting pointers such as this study for the NASA: NASA, in cooperation with the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, has funded research on napping. Despite NASA recommendations that astronauts sleep 8 hours a day when in space, they usually have trouble sleeping 8 hours at a stretch, ...


9

Well, this is hardly definitive; however, I have not been able to find any quote that was attributed to Einstein concerning him sleeping 10-11 hours a day. Also, I have found no reference to it that gives any sort of citation as to where they arrived at that information. One example of this sort of behavior is the book Power Sleep. While it makes the ...


9

Skeptoid episode #611 covers this claim and its foundation, specifically that static electricity builds up throughout the day. This is false. Fortunately, Skeptoid even covers the bedding aspect: There is a final nail in the coffin of earthing. The entire reason for its practice claimed by its advocates — that your shoes keep you electrically insulated ...


8

The simple answer is "yes." The human brain has evolved to sleep better in the dark and be more alert in the light. The reason has to do with the times of day our ancestors traditionally were active or resting. In the case of nocturnal animals, this relationship with light and dark is generally reversed. For a more thorough summary of why this is ...


8

That Wikipedia article and several visible results from Google searches on this topic appear to draw their information from a Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute press release, http://news.rpi.edu/luwakkey/3074. Going back to the source, it does indeed indicate that exposure to self-luminous displays for less than two hours still has an effect. The actual ...


8

No. Vegetarianism is not associated with more healthful sleep patterns, per se. Lowering the intake of protein hurts sleep quality. Moreover, the consumption of certain types of foods which impact the availability of tryptophan as well as the synthesis of serotonin and melatonin may aid in promoting sleep. But reducing fat and salt intake will improve ...


8

It depends. There have been several experiments on the effect of white noise on sleep, under different conditions leading to different conclusions: It helps neonates get to sleep. We studied two groups of 20 neonates, between 2 and 7 days old, in a randomised trial. Sixteen (80%) fell asleep within five minutes in response to white noise compared with ...


8

The problem is that even specialists in this field of sleep medicine use terms like "awake" or "arousal" with different meanings. In the sentence emphasized in the question "awake" almost certainly does not mean in the classical sense of Rechtschaffen and Kales (1968), who define awake as being cortically aroused for more than 15 seconds. Given the context ...


7

In this study on body movement during sleep there's a quote that says: (...) in both infants and young adults body movements occur preferentially in REM sleep1 So apparently there's a relation between the sleep cycle and body movement, with movement occuring during the lightest stage. This study tried different methods of detecting body movement ...


7

No. The module that controls the rate of charge and whether any charge is drawn from the power source and the AC power adapter resides in the iPhone, itself. As such, it's really not possible to "overcharge" a modern smartphone. Popular Mechanics says that lithium-ion batteries don’t overcharge, and instead will “trickle charge.” This happens ...


6

This heavy blanket may be another version of the so called 'Hug machine'. The hug machine consists of two padded boards, arranged in a V-shape. The user lies or squats between the boards, adjusts the pressure and waits for the stress to subside. It was invented by Temple Gradin, a scientist suffering from autism. A (small) studie has found that the machine ...


6

Honestly, more research is needed. Some research has already been done in the past 10 years, but not enough to really make solid conclusions. For example, there's no research to support the "10% of body weight + 1 pound" rule that you'll find all over the internet (example). With kids, there's also some concern about the safety of weighted devices. ...


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