55

THE claim "Bullies are looking for attention. Ignore them and the bullying will stop" is considered to be a myth since research shows that bullies are looking for control, and they rarely stop if their behavior is ignored. The level of bullying usually increases if the bullying is not addressed by adults since researchers in 2010 showed that recourse to "...


27

Is there any additional evidence that this claim is true? Does this meta review actually support this claim adequately? Apparently the answers are "No" and "No": http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-skeptical-sleuth/201111/is-having-abortion-likely-damage-womans-mental-health http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-skeptical-sleuth/201111/more-review-...


17

As per Wikipedia's by-country list of depression in "Epidemiology of depression": Rank Country DALY rate ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 1 United States 1,454.74 127 Russia 856.718 So; while Russia's rate is indeed, only officially 60% that of USA, it's incorrect to say that Russians don't get depressed. Additionally; ...


16

So, can you do a lab test for a mental disorder, and if not, what mitigating factors should be taken into account? A mental disorder typically manifests as a behavioural or mood disorder. See the Diagnosis of schizophrenia, for example: there isn't what you'd call a "lab test" to detect disorganized speech, disorganized behaviour, blunted affect, etc. -- ...


13

It seems that people with depression are more likely to commit murder. In this study, Homicide is strongly correlated to depression and not to mania, the authors concluded: Typical manic episodes could be the cause of penal infractions, usually benign. In contrast, forensic studies show a close relationship between depression, suicide and homicide. ...


11

While it likely depends on definitions of mental disorder and the diagnostic procedure (especially on the eve of a new edition of the DSM), this number is not too high. It is too low. R.V. Bijl á A. Ravelli á G. van Zessen, Prevalence of psychiatric disorder in the general population: results of the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (...


10

The claim is not supported by the research the article is based on The linked article says "Russians Don't Get Depressed", but they base that on a study which says nothing of the sort. The actual study focusses on the effects of what they call "self-reflection", not on depression itself: In Study 1, self-reflection was associated with fewer depressive ...


9

Researchers are driven by their research interest. As in any occupation, fraudsters exist. However, the types of fraud involving grants are, to my knowledge, in the paperwork domain. For example, researchers may grant people outside a research project money, for example, a spouse who is not entitled to the funding. For example: This Swedish article from ...


9

It's important to realize, here, that the study you linked does not claim mifepristone is effective for the treatment of depression. It provides some evidence for the treatment of psychosis in psychotic depression, which is a very particular type of depression that involves, among other things, a high level of cortisol. Mifepristone is a glucocorticoid ...


7

The daily mail article faithfully summarizes the results of this scientific article. Risks of all‐cause and suicide mortality in mental disorders: a meta‐review A meta‐review, or review of systematic reviews, was conducted to explore the risks of all‐cause and suicide mortality in major mental disorders. ... All disorders had an increased risk of all‐...


7

Yes and no. Usually the "chemical imbalance" is the consumer-oriented version of the serotonin hypothesis for depression. The most practiced method of testing this experimentally (and practically the only one available for live humans) is acute tryptophan depletion (ATD); tryptophan is a precursor for serotonin. It's been experimentally verified via PET ...


7

Yes (almost), in 2009 302 US active duty military deaths were due to suicide, and on the same year 149 US soldiers were killed in Iraq. According to a study of war-related deaths published by the Congressional Research Service in there were a total of 1515 active duty military deaths, of them 302 were self inflicted and 346 were as a result of hostile ...


6

Yes, some psychiatric disorders are curable. I was chatting to a research psychologist once about treatability of mental disorders. She told me specific phobias are easily treated with a high success rate with a single session with a therapist. Here is one example study that looked at arachnophobes, and agrees that a single session with a therapist is ...


6

Yes, light therapy does appear to be an effective treatment for Seasonal Affective Disorder. A study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry compared light therapy to fluoxetine (an SSRI antidepressant) in a double-blind trial. Each participant was given either a dim placebo light and the fluoxetine or a placebo pill and the actual (bright) therapy ...


4

In the comments, Tim helpfully links the original study (pdf). Are these numbers accurate? I went quickly through it and the answer is not quite. Did the study find a [...] difference based off of race? According to the paper, yes when considering callbacks. No when considering overall chances of getting any appointment. (there is no difference ...


4

Several sources claim that a person's apparent eye color can change (primarily and perhaps only in lightness or darkness) as the result of mood changes, illness, or stress level. Your quoted article doesn't give any details about the reported eye color changes in patients diagnosed with MPD, so it's hard to know if they may be referring only to such a ...


4

Upon further investigation, I'd rank this as quite plausible because the 2013 book The Making of DSM-III: A Diagnostic Manual's Conquest of American Psychiatry, sorta confirms it, although it might have happened quite a bit earlier than the drafting of the DSM-III: when the analysts opened the St. Louis Psychoanalytic Institute, [Samuel] Guze remembered, "...


4

According to The Phenomenon of Dissociation, Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors : The phrase “dissociative identity disorder” replaced “multiple personality disorder” because the new name emphasises the disruption of a person’s identity that characterises the disorder, while the term dissociation draws attention to the actual mental process ...


3

This particular claim does seem to be supported by the study: rumination is more common among Russians but it is not indicative of depression (unlike rumination in Americans). However, the framing of the paper presented in the article is misleading. The study has nothing to do with actual rates of depression, which, as mentioned by @CPerkins, might be ...


3

Answer: It's rarely as simple as that. You suggest picking a couple of diseases. Well, we have already seen that the story for Autism is far more complicated than just measuring diagnoses per 1000 people. I figured epilepsy would be a good example of a mental disorder with fairly well-defined symptoms. Sander JW., The epidemiology of epilepsy revisited., ...


2

Evidence of brain shrinkage: Quoted from Dr. Joanna Moncrieff, a Senior Lecturer in psychiatry at University College London and a practising consultant psychiatrist, since she did the research: In 2011, researchers, led by the former editor of the American Journal of Psychiatry, Nancy Andreasen, [...] found a strong correlation between the level of ...


2

This question has remained unanswered yet not closed, so I'll give it a go. First of all, a clarification regarding the title. If phobias are genetic, by definition they can't be created in a generation and inherited. The term epigenetic is the one that might have led to this confusion, so I'll start by defining it. 1. Epigenetics Epigenetics is the ...


2

Well, drowsiness and sleepiness are common side effects according to the Mayo Clinic (not surprising considering it is a type of benzodiazepine or minor tranquilizer), but that doesn't mean it isn't addictive. The paper Relative abuse liability of lorazepam and diazepam: an evaluation in ‘recreational’ drug users concluded that lorazepam has addiction ...


2

This is not even wrong. Depression is related to alterations of serotonin, dopamine transmitters and more: On the Complexity of Brain Disorders: A Symptom-Based Approach: Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by reduced mood, anhedonia, psychomotor retardation, and learned helplessness, among others (Kennedy, 2008). It ...


2

The Iraq KIA figures are supported by iCasualties.org, though I cannot determine what their sources are. A similar secondary source exists here, which provides data showing that 143 soldiers were killed in Iraq in 2009. The 149 figure is also supported here, though you have to register to see the sources. A good primary resource put together by the CBO ...


2

Does mifepristone (RU-486) help cure depression? The usage of the word "help" facilitates an answer: Yes. In the sense that it might be a valuable tool to treat some types of depression, and that it is a valuable tool in studying depression already. Clinical trials are still not enough in numbers and rigor, but they are starting to come in. This is ...


1

Point 1 doesn't appear to be true, at least looking at homicide. "mental illness" is a category as broad as the ocean but let's try... First let's look at psychotic patients. Rates of Homicide During the First Episode of Psychosis and After Treatment: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis The observation that almost half of the homicides committed by ...


1

Disclaimer: I am neither an optometrist nor vision researcher/specialist. The content I reference are lectures that were given at various COVD conferences for those kinds of professionals. I have no vested interest in any products that promote the sale of treatments for these ailments. I do have a vested interest in the sale of the recorded content of these ...


1

The Metanoia referenced report is just an op-ed piece. The Daily Mail report is of the quality expected from the Daily Mail and is best glossed over. It references, and is badly paraphrased from the Daily Dot (no idea), which is taken from the executive summary published by the University of Zurich newspaper, which is taken from the executive summary of the ...


1

David Healy, professor of psychiatry at Bangor University and authority on side effects of psychiatric medications who has testified in numerous court cases involving suicides and homicides whose perpetrators were ingesting antidepressants, is on record to say, "Data on antidepressants and violence are much more scarce than data on suicide," and under oath ...


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