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In Conversations on Consciousness by Susan Blackmore (ISBN 978-0-19-280623-9), on page 140, Stephen LaBerge references a study he did to provide evidence of lucid dreaming. He knew that observed eye movement in REM state did sometimes correspond with reported subjective gaze direction in regular dreams. He'd also already mastered techniques to become lucid ...


7

Yes, it is theoretically possible, in one narrow, specific sense: Some people talk in their REM sleep. Some dream content is influenced by auditory stimuli. Take two people sleeping within earshot of each other: if one starts talking in their sleep about their dream content, while the other is dreaming, then that may influence the other's dream. (If they ...


5

Yes, we (adults) dream more than once every night. The University of Californa has a Dream Research team. Their FAQ explains: How often do we dream, and when? Most people over the age of 10 dream at least 4 to 6 times per night during a stage of sleep called REM (for Rapid Eye Movements, a distinguishing characteristic of this stage of sleep). ...


5

The reason Freud called his analysis "scientific" is for rhetorical purposes. He believed that science had given the lie to all things "supernatural", but the interpretations of dreams was still full of supernatural claims, which he hoped to eliminate through his own set of materialist rules. As he says in The Interpretation of Dreams (1913): It would ... ...


3

According to Medline Plus, eating right before bed can increase your metabolism and increase your brain's overnight activity, leading to dreams and nightmares. Substances such as alcohol and nicotine cause a lighter sleep and prevent REM sleep, which decreases dreaming. However, some foods may increase REM sleep, which increases dreaming. The British ...


2

No. According to A Cartesian Introduction to Philosophy (1986): This shows, by the way, why it's so pointless for you to pinch yourself to see if you're awake. You may dream that you are pinching yourself, and you may dream that you are finding yourself to be awake. Of course, if you are just dreaming that you are doing this, you are mistaken. In light ...


1

TL;DR: This site shows no evidence for the paranormal, and indeed is careful not to explicitly claim it exists. What is described could be largely explained by known psychological theories and coincidence. If we examine the World of Lucid Dreaming web-site which is the source of the claims, we find that its claims have no strength. It doesn't assert that ...


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