202

NO WAY! There are a few sticky issues here that I will try to address. First of all Mr. Akin is only talking about "legitimate rape" while not defining which rapes he considers legitimate. It could be the only rapes he considers legitimate are the ones where the victim doesn't get pregnant and if she does get pregnant, she must have been "asking for it," ...


97

No, the picture is not accurate. No, “42% of yearly deaths in the world” are not from abortion. As Avi’s answer shows, the raw numbers are about right, albeit with a big uncertainty attached. However, the percentages are wrong because the 42% implies that the “total number of deaths” = “number of deaths after birth” + “number of abortions”. This is ...


69

The global death rate was 7.99 per thousand people per year. The world population is about 7.1 billion people. This means that about 56 million people die a year, excluding abortions. This approximately aligns with the estimate for the number of postnatal deaths in the image. The Guttmacher Institute estimates that there were 43.8 million abortions in 2008. ...


56

The following is true, look up: Dawe GS, Tan XW, Xiao ZC. Cell migration from baby to mother. Cell Adh Migr. 2007;1:19–27. [PMC free article] [PubMed] The scientific name of this process is called microchimerism, defined by another study as: the presence of cells originating from another individual therefore genetically distinct from the host cells, ...


32

No, this is a fictional article. The source of the article is the World News Daily Report (WNDR). Their disclaimer page explains: WNDR assumes however all responsibility for the satirical nature of its articles and for the fictional nature of their content. All characters appearing in the articles in this website – even those based on real people – are ...


22

From your source: Like any unscientific gender test, it's accurate about half the time 50% isn't much, you might as well flip a coin. Also from your source: Many things factor into the shape and size of the belly during pregnancy, though gender does not make the list as far as medical science is concerned. So even your source admits that this is ...


19

According to Snopes the answer is NO: Barbara Mikkelson (who has contacted several airlines to get to the bottom of this) speculates: ... the origin of the "lifetime pass" legend came about as a fanciful explanation for why some airlines refuse passage to expectant women. And there are indeed special regulations for pregnant women, e.g. British ...


17

Yes, most pregnancy tests detect human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone produced by fertilized eggs, but also by some kinds of cancer cells. You can read more about different tumor markers on this info page from "The American Cancer Society". There are also several other situations where a pregnancy test may give a false positive result (both for ...


17

The eating of placenta is widespread in the mammalian kingdom - virtually all mammalian species do it (with humans, camels, llamas and alpacas being the notable exceptions). I couldn't find studies looking at the affect of postpartum placenta eating in human females, however there are a couple out there looking at animals instead. Notably, there's a couple ...


16

There may be a "safe" amount, but research has not been able to identify what amount that might be. According to The American Academy of Pediatrics: Mills et al14 prospectively studied approximately 31 000 pregnancies in an attempt to determine how much alcohol pregnant women can consume safely. The consumption of 1 or more drinks (a drink is defined as ...


16

Yes Multiple relatively unbiased sources have both video and transcripts of this line, often with a correction: Right now, in a number of states, the laws allow a baby to be born [torn] from his or her mother’s womb in the ninth month. It is wrong; it has to change. The Hill, “FULL SPEECH: Addressing March for Life, Trump touts gains in anti-...


15

No, the Red Cabbage test is very unlikely to be a reliable way of determining the sex of a fetus. Although I was unable to find any reliable, scientific test of the "Red cabbage" method there has been informal study of a related test, the Drano Test. The Drano Test would likely rely on the same method of operation (Colour of mum's urine affecting the ...


14

Do pregnant women think they have a heightened sense of smell? Yes. Steven Nordin, Daniel A. Broman, Jonas K. Olofsson and Marianne Wulff, A Longitudinal Descriptive Study of Self-reported Abnormal Smell and Taste Perception in Pregnant Women, Chem. Senses (2004) 29 (5): 391-402. doi: 10.1093/chemse/bjh040 The results show that abnormal smell and/or ...


12

Yes, there is a connection. Heartburn is a normal consequence of pregnancy. The predominant aetiology is a decrease in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure caused by female sex hormones, especially progesterone [1]. Sixty-four pregnant women ranked the severity of their degree of heartburn during pregnancy. Independent coders rated newborn hair ...


12

No, Human fetus cannot feel pain at 20 weeks per three research studies mentioned. Per conclusions of the 2005 JAMA study Evidence Synthesis Pain perception requires conscious recognition or awareness of a noxious stimulus. Neither withdrawal reflexes nor hormonal stress responses to invasive procedures prove the existence of fetal pain, because they can ...


12

Clinical Damage from Ultrasound I had a look for some research for this and found the most recent study I could from the Health Protection Agency UK (2010) Some key quotes from the summary. At high levels of exposure, ultrasound is capable of causing permanent damage to biological tissues, including teratogenic effects, through heating, acoustic ...


12

Here are the raw numbers claimed in the article: From 2000 to the end of 2010, Texas’s estimated maternal mortality rate hovered between 17.7 and 18.6 per 100,000 births. But after 2010, that rate had leaped to 33 deaths per 100,000, and in 2014 it was 35.8. The study these numbers are based on can be found here. The relevant graph was also posted to ...


11

Unlikely but possible according to http://www.americanpregnancy.org/preventingpregnancy/pregnancyfaqmyths.html Can sperm travel through clothing or material? If the clothing was completely saturated with semen and was in direct contact with a woman’s vagina, there is a very slight chance the sperm could enter the vagina, but this is highly unlikely. No ...


10

In Abstract to paper the author's claim that while high-power ultrasound can be dangerous, the low powers used in diagnostic tests pose no detectable threat to the fetus, and so the risks are outweighed by the benefits of having a diagnostic. It has been estimated that more than half of all pregnant women in the United States undergo diagnostic ultrasound ...


10

Pregnancy can cause skin to darken in the face, nipples, and even in a line from the belly button to the pubic region. This darkening can sometimes be referred to as a "glow", similar to someone with a tan might be considered to glow. In the second trimester (13-28 weeks) a woman begins to look noticeably pregnant and the enlarged uterus is easy to ...


10

No, except for some subcommunities. PLoS Biology published an article reviewing the evidence: Paul DB, Spencer HG (2008) “It's Ok, We're Not Cousins by Blood”: The Cousin Marriage Controversy in Historical Perspective. PLoS Biol 6(12): e320. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060320 Until recently, good data on which to base an answer were lacking. As a result, ...


9

The numbers are correct. The definitions, and thus the argument, are not. As in both Avi's and Konrad's answers, the number of postnatal deaths and the number of abortions in this poster are correct, given the latest information on world population, mortality rate, and number of abortions. However, they were arrived at by ignoring the fact that the ...


8

The CDC, NIH, Mayo Clinic, ACS, ALA, and the Australian Government are all saying the same thing. There are known studies that smoking lowers the birth-weight of a baby, which is one of the main factors in their likelihood to survive. It also raises the risk of SIDS. According to Laws PJ, Grayson N & Sullivan EA babies of smoking mothers are 50% more ...


7

Researchers at Boston University’s School of Public Health discovered in 2013 that long-term users of oral contraceptives, similar to short-term users, experienced a temporary delay in fertility when compared to those discontinuing barrier contraceptives (like condoms or diaphragms). “But after that, monthly fertility rates are comparable to those of women ...


7

The Cochrane Collaboration very recently a systematic review on the subject, where they look at all of the published evidence, weigh it up and explain what it says. (I don't believe in appeals to authority, but the Cochrane Collaboration make me think twice about my position...) Cluett ER, Burns E. Immersion in water in labour and birth. Cochrane Database ...


6

There does seem to be quite a bit of information regarding water birth online. My mother happens to be a midwife practicing home/birth-center birth and uses tubs in both locations. A cursory search across Google found the following: Immersion in Water During Labour and Birth (Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists/Royal College of Midwives Joint ...


5

The NHS website says You can eat peanuts or food containing peanuts, such as peanut butter, during pregnancy, unless you're allergic to them or a health professional advises you not to. You may have heard peanuts should be avoided during pregnancy. This is because the government previously advised women to avoid eating peanuts if there was a history ...


3

Yes, according to Fact Sheet 18 | WHEN PARENTS ARE RELATED – CONSANGUINITY: If parents are unrelated, their risk for having a child with a birth defect or disability is between 2% and 3%. If parents are first cousins, the risk is a little higher at 5% to 6%. This is due to the increased chance that they will both carry the same autosomal recessive ...


3

I'm suspicious of their claims, but can find no concrete evidence to debunk or prove it. The two medical papers that relate to the product were written by the exact same people, and both read like advertisements in places, going to unusual efforts to include a ® symbol with every mention of the product name. It also seems significantly odd that they'd ...


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