215

The study that the company uses to prove that "scalar waves" give human skin the ability to "neutralize" UV rays is bunk, for a multitude of reasons. Instead of commenting on the existence of scalar waves and their purported ability to block UV rays, I investigated their own website to determine what their proof of this supposed finding was. Scrolling down ...


82

There is a review article: Effects of reiki in clinical practice: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials International Journal of Clinical Practice Volume 62, Issue 6, pages 947–954, June 2008. In conclusion, the evidence is insufficient to suggest that reiki is an effective treatment for any condition.


75

In addition to the other excellent answers, which already show that the product is not to be trusted, I'd like to point out two more reasons why one should be worried about the "research" being presented. Firstly I'd like to point out that the article is not published, thus, not peer reviewed. While it might look like actual research, it's just a pdf that ...


66

It was a different claim, and that claim is not validated First, you cannot mess around with the body's pH value, because you die if you do. The pH value of blood must be between 7.35 and 7.45. And the body is quite good at regulating this. Hence, you cannot make the body into "an alkaline environment". Second, Nobel laureate Otto Warburg did observe ...


64

The claim, "The skeptical movement is an offshoot of the Communist Party" is not found in either of the links provided. The first link says, "I know that not all skeptics have these roots." The second link says, "the whole British ‘quackbuster’ operation was being redefined by a group of Liberal peers and members of the late Revolutionary Communist Party" -- ...


60

While anything is possible, there is absolutely no reason to believe these claims, mostly because the claims don't make any sense scientifically. "Scalar waves" is a meaningless term, as claimed to have been applied here. It is a theoretical construct that exists in quantum theory, and the idea that they could imprint it in some sort of permanent, fixed ...


49

Short answer: No, pox parties are NOT safer than vaccines. This was asked at the Parenting StackExchange. Here is my answer from that: PROS of VACCINES: The vaccine is administered in a doctor's office. Understand that NOTHING is 100% safe (even breathing), so should there be any reactions, you will be with a doctor. The patient that gets the vaccine ...


38

Reiki is a framework that the Japanese Buddhist Mikao Usui developed in 1922. In Mikau Usui own account he didn't find it through empiric investigation but says that the Reiki methology came as a vision to him. In basic Reiki a practioner puts his hands on a patient and then visualizes specific symbols. Those symbols are then believed to create qi flow ...


24

No... There is no evidence that copper bracelets are any more useful than a hologram, or an ion bracelet, or a piece of amber, etc. (See below for a minor caveat.) Any effect that could be out there is nothing more than the [placebo effect] (Link to abstract on placebo effect for this specific mechanism)1. If you had read the linked question, you should ...


24

The answer to your question title is no. The act of putting raw meat on a bruise comes from Hollywood and cartoons, and it usually is adopted when you have a black eye, rather than just any bruise. But what works is the cold factor of the frozen meat and not the meat itself, since cold naturally constrains blood vessels and helps reducing the swelling. In ...


21

Wearing socks can be bad for your feet if they become damp because they can keep that moisture surrounding your foot for prolonged periods, this is fairly common among soldiers. This pdf outlines various ailments caused by prolonged exposure to wet conditions at varying temperatures. It also links to two studies performed on soldiers. A convincing ...


21

"Toxins" in the context of homeopathy/alternative medicine aren't real and are not harbored in the body. Therefore any "cure" is just as fake. Your colon does not accumulate detritus or poisons, and any blockage or accumulation is pathological. Chelating agents are used to bind heavy metals in vivo before they are excreted, and I'm not aware of any ...


18

In short, yes. Picking one of the first recent publications to come up in my search for "honey wound healing", I give you Honey and Wound Healing: An Update (DOI 10.1007/s40257-016-0247-8), which "outlines publications regarding honey and wound healing that have been published between June 2010 and August 2016". The "key points" listed in the electronic ...


18

"Are there any peer reviewed studies regarding the efficacy of heating the sinuses as a treatment for COVID-19, or more generally upper respiratory diseases?" No. None that I could find. Since the virus is systemic, including deep in the lungs, where it causes pneumonia as the most dangerous manifestation of COVID-19, I don't see how "heating the sinuses" ...


17

tl;dr- The collection of claims about "Harmonized Water" appear to be incoherent gibberish which prevents us from falsifying them ("not even wrong"). If this were a real product, a common chemistry lab device (UV spectrometer) could've easily demonstrated its ability to block UV rays. EDIT: Reference (9) from the PDF on "Harmonized Water" appears to ...


16

Summary: Chickenpox as a disease results in 2 deaths per 100,000 cases, and about 2,000 per 100,000 cases of complications. Chickenpox vaccine results in ~0.15 deaths per 100,000 cases (most of which turn out to be due to natural varicella, so the true death rate is lower), and about 67.5 per 100,000 cases of complications. Thus, for children, vaccination is ...


16

It is unlikely that there are benefits for healthy individuals. On the one hand, the amount of water one should supposedly drink each morning in this therapy, would lead a person to nearly exceed their recommended daily intake, all in one go. On the other hand, the magical claims posited are already mostly shown to be myths. This article from The Guardian ...


16

I agree with Larry at the crucial parts of the article. To explain a bit: The WHO is nowhere near hiding Artemisia for anti-malaria medication. In fact, four drugs prepared from the plant are on their list of essential medicines. But: these are to be used in drug combinations. What the WHO is very much concerned about is drug resistance, which is also ...


15

This is a religiously motivated idea. And it is very probably a quite terrible idea from a health perspective. It is definitively a terrible idea from a taste perspective. After reviewing the available literature for claims and results we have to conclude that there is no evidence to support these claims. Two experts who should really know the literature on ...


13

No. A fairly recent study performed at MIT has outlined a potential alternative pathway that's probably very common, as the study points out that lack of glucose and oxygen is not an uncommon state for cancer cells: Much of the body’s supply of oxygen and glucose is carried in the bloodstream, but blood vessels often do not penetrate far into the body of ...


13

I would say it doesn't work. I found this Shared Pathology blog: Biodisc - fraud of the century "As a scientist, I was astonished. It didn't surprise me that I couldn't find any scientific experiments [Emoto] has performed or any peer-reviewed journal articles that have been published describing controlled studies of Emoto's work. A further ...


13

As a physician I have to tell you that regular induced self-vomiting has the following short-term consequences: 1.- Dehydration and electrolyte imbalance that can potentially cause metabolic alkalosis, hypokalaemia and hypochloraemia (that in turn perpetuates the alkalosis). 2.- In severe metabolic alkalosis with marked dehydration, acidic urine may be ...


13

The WHO's position on alternative medicine seems to be the same as their position on conventional medicine: if it is proven to work and proven to be safe, go ahead and use it. The document you linked was published in 2013 and outlines the WHO's general strategy and position regarding alternative medicines, though they tend to refer to them as traditional ...


12

Evidence and theory both suggest that the answer is no, magnets do not have any health effect whatsoever. A nice article that surveys the topic notes problems with studies showing positive effects not being blind. "Many “controlled” experiments are suspect because it is difficult to blind subjects to the presence of a magnet. An example is a randomised ...


12

There are many, many claims here. Some are very broad. (e.g. Cancer is not one disease.) I thought the best way to answer is to list some of the properties of garlic that have been subjected to meta-analysis by the Cochrane Collaboration. Garlic may help with the prevention of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hypertensive patients, but isn't ...


12

It is known that many animals posess the ability to sense magnetic fields (magnetoreception), a well-known example are migratory birds. Humans are generally considered to lack such a mechanism. From the article "A behavioral perspective on the biophysics of the light-dependent magnetic compass: a link between directional and spatial perception?": The ...


12

This claim ultimately traces back to a May 30, 2000, article published by AlterNet, Pot Shrinks Tumors; Government Knew in '74, and a book first published in 1985. The AlterNet story claims that: In 1974 researchers at the Medical College of Virginia, who had been funded by the National Institute of Health to find evidence that marijuana damages the ...


11

No Yoga has been researched for 100 years and researchers have churned out more than 3000 research papers, but none of the studies present any conclusive evidence for the efficacy of yoga in treating any illness. They have not even been successful in standardizing the so called yoga therapy. According to Verrastro [Verrastro G, 2014], although yoga has ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible