217

The study that the company uses to prove that "scalar waves" give human skin the ability to "neutralize" UV rays is bunk, for a multitude of reasons. Instead of commenting on the existence of scalar waves and their purported ability to block UV rays, I investigated their own website to determine what their proof of this supposed finding ...


82

There is a review article: Effects of reiki in clinical practice: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials International Journal of Clinical Practice Volume 62, Issue 6, pages 947–954, June 2008. In conclusion, the evidence is insufficient to suggest that reiki is an effective treatment for any condition.


75

In addition to the other excellent answers, which already show that the product is not to be trusted, I'd like to point out two more reasons why one should be worried about the "research" being presented. Firstly I'd like to point out that the article is not published, thus, not peer reviewed. While it might look like actual research, it's just a pdf that ...


66

It was a different claim, and that claim is not validated First, you cannot mess around with the body's pH value, because you die if you do. The pH value of blood must be between 7.35 and 7.45. And the body is quite good at regulating this. Hence, you cannot make the body into "an alkaline environment". Second, Nobel laureate Otto Warburg did observe ...


64

The claim, "The skeptical movement is an offshoot of the Communist Party" is not found in either of the links provided. The first link says, "I know that not all skeptics have these roots." The second link says, "the whole British ‘quackbuster’ operation was being redefined by a group of Liberal peers and members of the late Revolutionary Communist Party" -- ...


60

While anything is possible, there is absolutely no reason to believe these claims, mostly because the claims don't make any sense scientifically. "Scalar waves" is a meaningless term, as claimed to have been applied here. It is a theoretical construct that exists in quantum theory, and the idea that they could imprint it in some sort of permanent, ...


38

Reiki is a framework that the Japanese Buddhist Mikao Usui developed in 1922. In Mikau Usui own account he didn't find it through empiric investigation but says that the Reiki methology came as a vision to him. In basic Reiki a practioner puts his hands on a patient and then visualizes specific symbols. Those symbols are then believed to create qi flow ...


24

I agree with Larry at the crucial parts of the article. To explain a bit: The WHO is nowhere near hiding Artemisia for anti-malaria medication. In fact, four drugs prepared from the plant are on their list of essential medicines. But: these are to be used in drug combinations. What the WHO is very much concerned about is drug resistance, which is also ...


24

The answer to your question title is no. The act of putting raw meat on a bruise comes from Hollywood and cartoons, and it usually is adopted when you have a black eye, rather than just any bruise. But what works is the cold factor of the frozen meat and not the meat itself, since cold naturally constrains blood vessels and helps reducing the swelling. In ...


20

"Are there any peer reviewed studies regarding the efficacy of heating the sinuses as a treatment for COVID-19, or more generally upper respiratory diseases?" No. None that I could find. Since the virus is systemic, including deep in the lungs, where it causes pneumonia as the most dangerous manifestation of COVID-19, I don't see how "heating ...


18

In short, yes. Picking one of the first recent publications to come up in my search for "honey wound healing", I give you Honey and Wound Healing: An Update (DOI 10.1007/s40257-016-0247-8), which "outlines publications regarding honey and wound healing that have been published between June 2010 and August 2016". The "key points" listed in the electronic ...


17

tl;dr- The collection of claims about "Harmonized Water" appear to be incoherent gibberish which prevents us from falsifying them ("not even wrong"). If this were a real product, a common chemistry lab device (UV spectrometer) could've easily demonstrated its ability to block UV rays. EDIT: Reference (9) from the PDF on "Harmonized Water" appears to ...


15

This is a religiously motivated idea. And it is very probably a quite terrible idea from a health perspective. It is definitively a terrible idea from a taste perspective. After reviewing the available literature for claims and results we have to conclude that there is no evidence to support these claims. Two experts who should really know the literature on ...


14

This claim ultimately traces back to a May 30, 2000, article published by AlterNet, Pot Shrinks Tumors; Government Knew in '74, and a book first published in 1985. The AlterNet story claims that: In 1974 researchers at the Medical College of Virginia, who had been funded by the National Institute of Health to find evidence that marijuana damages the immune ...


14

The WHO's position on alternative medicine seems to be the same as their position on conventional medicine: if it is proven to work and proven to be safe, go ahead and use it. The document you linked was published in 2013 and outlines the WHO's general strategy and position regarding alternative medicines, though they tend to refer to them as traditional ...


14

It is NOT TRUE that "most humans are hosts to these parasitic worms called Ascaris lumbricoides (Roundworms)." Ascariasis (CDC.gov, 2018): An estimated 807 million–1.2 billion people in the world are infected with Ascaris lumbricoides...Ascariasis is now uncommon in the United States. There is NO EVIDENCE that "water fasting is by far, one of the ...


13

As a physician I have to tell you that regular induced self-vomiting has the following short-term consequences: 1.- Dehydration and electrolyte imbalance that can potentially cause metabolic alkalosis, hypokalaemia and hypochloraemia (that in turn perpetuates the alkalosis). 2.- In severe metabolic alkalosis with marked dehydration, acidic urine may be ...


12

It is known that many animals posess the ability to sense magnetic fields (magnetoreception), a well-known example are migratory birds. Humans are generally considered to lack such a mechanism. From the article "A behavioral perspective on the biophysics of the light-dependent magnetic compass: a link between directional and spatial perception?": The ...


12

It sounds like this is a Russian variant of a common home remedy of inhaling steam as a decongestant. [Examples: The Health Site, WebMD] The Cochrane Library reviewed the evidence: Heated, humidified air for the common cold. There is not enough evidence to show if steam inhalation improves or exacerbates nasal congestion when a person has a cold The ...


11

No Yoga has been researched for 100 years and researchers have churned out more than 3000 research papers, but none of the studies present any conclusive evidence for the efficacy of yoga in treating any illness. They have not even been successful in standardizing the so called yoga therapy. According to Verrastro [Verrastro G, 2014], although yoga has been ...


11

That paper you quote from by Tayag et al is listed as For Publication where coconut oil was administered to 15 HIV positive patients. 3 of the 15 HIV positive patients developed clinical AIDs on this treatment and 1 died just after 3 months of treatment. If you look on Pubmed, this paper can not be found, and presumably was such poor quality that it was ...


11

Although thought-provoking, the article doesn't claim either that the tea "will prevent malaria" or that the WHO is "trying to hide" it. Rather it says: [A] randomized controlled trial on this farm showed that workers who drank it regularly reduced their risk of suffering from multiple episodes of malaria by one-third. and [M]alaria experts worry ...


10

There is little limited research on if/how Gripe Water works. This literature review from 2000 looks at the evidence of how Gripe Water deals with colic (which may or may not be caused by intestinal discomfort): Blumenthal, I (April 2000). "The Gripe Water Story". Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 93 (4): 172–174. PMC 1297971. PMID 10844880. Some ...


9

There is no scientific evidence that vinegar - apple cider vinegar (ACV), specifically, since that's what is often claimed to be an effective treatment for a number of conditions - is an effective treatment for arthritis. Some of the claimed effects of ACV: Some proponents of apple cider vinegar claim it can cure everything from diabetes to acid reflux,...


9

According to NPR's A History Of 'Snake Oil Salesmen': Made from the oil of the Chinese water snake, which is rich in the omega-3 acids that help reduce inflammation, snake oil in its original form really was effective, especially when used to treat arthritis and bursitis. The workers would rub the oil, used for centuries in China, on their joints after a ...


9

Ginger has anti-inflammatory properties. It inhibits the induction of several genes involved in the inflammatory response [1]. It mostly modulates biochemical pathways activated in chronic inflammation. It also enhances thermogenesis and reduces feelings of hunger [2]. When it comes to anti-viral effects, it was found that fresh ginger is effective against ...


9

While some studies have promoted Ginkgo Biloba as possibly having these effects, the results have been mixed at best, and the claims seem to be unlikely. WebMD says the following with regards to Ginkgo Biloba: Ginkgo improves blood flow to the brain and acts as an antioxidant. These effects may translate into some benefits for certain medical problems, but ...


8

There are studies on cupping, but many are of poor quality, published in alternative medicine journals, and mostly done in East Asia--which can influence the results. The short version, is that there is some evidence for efficacy of cupping for specific conditions. But the results are not very rigourous. For example, Zhen Jiu Lin Chuang Za Zhi (Clinical ...


8

The Cochrane Collaboration very recently a systematic review on the subject, where they look at all of the published evidence, weigh it up and explain what it says. (I don't believe in appeals to authority, but the Cochrane Collaboration make me think twice about my position...) Cluett ER, Burns E. Immersion in water in labour and birth. Cochrane Database ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible