85

In 2018, my colleagues and I published a comprehensive systematic review examining the extent and quality of evidence on all fertility awareness based methods (FABMs) for pregnancy prevention for which effectiveness studies have been published. That systematic review is available here: https://journals.lww.com/greenjournal/Abstract/2018/09000/...


32

3.2% sounds somewhat good, but notice that the quoted failure rates are per year, not per couple. For a couple using this method, over a ten year period, there is a 28% chance of at least one pregnancy, over twenty years it is 48%, and over twenty-five years it is 56%. 100% - (100%-3.2%)¹⁰, 100% - (100%-3.2%)²⁰, and 100% - (100%-3.2%)²⁵ So, even if ...


22

The MEASURE Demographic and Health Surveys project published an analytical study on Recent Trends in Abortion and Contraception in 12 Countries in 2005, the 12 countries in the study being Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Moldova, Romania, Russia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. From the Executive Summary of the ...


17

The Creighton Method of NFP is fairly effective, but in lab research not quite as effective as the market copy with perfect use. Use effectiveness of the Creighton model ovulation method of natural family planning RESULTS: At 12 months of use, the Creighton model was 98.8% method effective and 98.0% use effective in avoiding pregnancy. It was 24.4% use ...


16

Firstly, the 4% perfect use failure rate is merely someone's guess, particularly James Trussell as author of "Contraceptive failure in the United States", Contraception vol. 70, pages 89-96: Our estimate of the proportion becoming pregnant during a year of perfect use of withdrawal is an educated guess based on the reasoning that pregnancy resulting from ...


16

Ezra Klein at The Washington Post comments "Not Quite" in his article. Jones’s study does not find that 98 percent of all Catholic women have used contraceptives. What it does, however, bear out is the claim that many have made with this statistic: that sexually-active, Catholic women do tend to use contraceptives at the same rate as their non-Catholic ...


16

The premise of this question is incorrect; there has been no increase in divorce rates in recent years, and in fact they have been decreasing since 1996. (raw data here if you want to look through it - but it's really raw, pdf table ew). Edit: oh right and infidelity has been basically flat. (that article is trying to say it's gone down, but honestly their ...


12

You seem to have two main questions here, asking if RISUG exists and if so, if it is safe and effective. I will answer each in turn. Does RISUG exist? There is little question that RISUG exists, as there is an abundance of evidence. There is a patent filed in the US which shows at the least that the design/technique exists(1). There are several peer ...


9

I looked into the references from the other answers (and some more references), here is what I learned. The TL;DR version: Levonorgestrel is not effective at preventing pregnancy in women who have already ovulated. The product labeling does not reflect evidence showing that levonorgestrel does prevent implantation by some identifiable mechanism; only ...


7

Oral Contraceptives actually increases gray matter. According to 50 years of hormonal contraception—time to find out, what it does to our brain (Belinda A. Pletzer and Hubert H. Kerschbaum), areas of the brain displayed larger volumes of gray matter1. 1Effects of hormonal contraceptives on brain structure Recent results demonstrated that regional gray ...


7

To properly answer this question definitively, we would need the results of a five-year long study. That would be very expensive and of limited value, and I was doubtful that one would exist. Proving the non-existence of studies is practically impossible, but a technique that we have accepted here before at Skeptics.SE is finding an appropriate expert who ...


7

Yes, if the woman has reliable cycles and also pays attention to her cervical fluid. When a woman ovulates, it intrinsically causes a rise in progesterone (this is known as the luteal phase). The presence of progesterone causes the body's basal temperature to rise by a few centigrade. Therefore, a slight raise in the BBT mid-cycle helps to confirm the ...


7

Researchers at Boston University’s School of Public Health discovered in 2013 that long-term users of oral contraceptives, similar to short-term users, experienced a temporary delay in fertility when compared to those discontinuing barrier contraceptives (like condoms or diaphragms). “But after that, monthly fertility rates are comparable to those of women ...


6

Yes, trace amounts of birth control medications, other medications, and household and industrial chemicals are really present in drinking water. According to the US Geological Survey study Pharmaceuticals, Hormones, and Other Organic Wastewater Contaminants in U.S. Streams, 1999-2000: A National Reconnaissance Birth control hormones found in US streams ...


5

As others have pointed out, there are problems with the original questions, but that does not invalidate the original idea. A primary usage of contraceptives is to prevent children, and we know they are rather effective at this. And apparently "The divorce rate among couples with children is 40 percent lower than couples without children" [1]. I have been ...


4

According to the Guttmacher Institute the answer is yes - 98% of sexually experienced Catholic women have used artificial contraception. Among all women who have had sex, 99% have ever used a contraceptive method other than natural family planning. This figure is virtually the same, 98%, among sexually experienced Catholic women. Guttmacher ...


4

A large study from the UK published in the BMJ in 2010 suggests that pill users are not at extra risk compared to non-users. This study was designed to explore mortality from many causes not just cancer and its scale and longevity would tend to suggest it is a robust analysis. the design: Prospective cohort study started in 1968 with mortality data ...


2

A fact sheet on emergency contraception by the WHO from February 2016 claims: Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive pills are not effective once the process of implantation has begun The FIGO claimed in October 2008: Review of the evidence suggests that LNG ECPs cannot prevent implantation of a fertilized egg. In 2011, FIGO repeated this claim, ...


2

According to an article from the National Association of Convenience Stores (NACS): "In simple terms these companies and unions applied for and received a waiver that would allow them to continue offering 'limited benefit plans' to their part-time, seasonal and temporary employees. The waiver is for one year and only waives the portion of the law ...


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