16

That's an interesting question! So I will first explain the exact mechanism of Xylitol in our oral cavity. Xylitol, is a naturally occurring five-carbon sugar polyol, a white crystalline carbohydrate. Now the most significant contributor or the pioneer bacteria for dental caries (which further leads to tooth decay) is Streptococcus Mutans. Xylitol reduces ...


11

It seems to be peer-reviewed, but that's not really conclusive of the study's quality. The article itself admits in its abstract that it's only looking at correlation, not causation: In this study, which only allowed for the calculation of unadjusted observational associations They also used a convenience sample, children that showed up at 3 clinics. And ...


8

The whole you-didn't-image-this-in-a-highly-purified-sample is a red herring with regard to determining whether a (suspected) virus is a "a brand new viral pathogen" or not. Nobody does that kind of novelty determination based on imaging the virus... simply because lots of viruses look alike even under electron microscopy. Imaging is not a useful ...


8

It is essentially irrelevant whether the virus was purified, and the reason it wasn't in the cases that the Youtube video mentioned is that it simply was not necessary or useful to add a purification step there. I'll quote a pagagraph from a random electron microscopy paper about SARS-CoV2 I found here: To avoid artefacts associated with virus concentration ...


7

Yes. A Portuguese court found the isolated use of nothing but a PCR-test is 'not fit for purpose'. The purpose here being the ordered quarantine of those merely 'tested positive'. The court concluded that a PCR test alone was insufficient to diagnose the illness or to determine infectivity of any person tested, and was insufficient grounds for forced ...


6

There's actually a paper published only one year after the other answer "Catching HIV ‘in the act’ with 3D electron microscopy", which I think satisfies some of the imaging requirements. Of course the infection is demonstrated in a isolated cell


4

The book may actually be correct and Mayo (surprisingly) rather wrong here. According to a 2020 review: Several published reviews have concluded that milk is of very low cariogenicity and may have some caries protective potential. For example, WHO reviewed the strength of the evidence in 2003 and concluded that a “decreased risk” of dental caries from milk ...


3

Cow's milk contains both casein and whey protein. Both contain the same amino acids, but casein is "slow release" and whey is digested more readily. Like most animals, 80% of cow's milk protein is casein and 20% is whey. UK figures suggest that 7% of babies under 1 year old are allergic to casein protein, and therefore this is removed when making ...


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