346

The earliest mention I could find of this experiment was in the popular business/self-help book, Competing for the future by Gary Hamel and C. K. Prahalad (1996). Here is the quote from the book: 4 monkeys in a room. In the center of the room is a tall pole with a bunch of bananas suspended from the top. One of the four monkeys scampers up the pole and ...


187

TL;DR: It sounds like a similar monkey experiment did take place, and the results were similar to that presented in the picture, but if this is the same experiment, most of the details are wrong. The first google result for monkeys ladder experiment contains to the following information: Stephenson (1967) trained adult male and female rhesus monkeys to ...


140

Counter-argument: One of the most successful interrogators of Nazi Germany did not use torture. Quite the opposite really. Hanns Scharff, "Master Interrogator" of the Luftwaffe. Scharff was opposed to physically abusing prisoners to obtain information. Learning on the job, Scharff instead relied upon the Luftwaffe's approved list of techniques, which ...


125

Yes, humans are more predictable than random chance. It is known as the "Blue-Seven Phenomena", because when asked for a colour and a number from one to nine, these perform beyond expectation. This 2015 encyclopedia entry surveys the research. One large sample of Japanese university students found: As for the preferred number, the subjects in Saito’s ...


106

This is the study the article mentions. Does the study have those conclusions? Not really. The experimental results could equally be explained by a simpler conclusion, that people are less likely to ask others out when they feel disappointed, deflated or embarrassed by something (in this case, the public revelation of a poor test result). The researchers ...


92

The short answer The study in question (Van Hiel et al. 2019) has been published in a reputable peer-reviewed journal. It presents empirical support for the hypothesis that emotional abilities negatively correlate with right-wing attitudes. This answers the question in the title. The question body also asks about the link between cognitive abilities and ...


91

Definitely not. Here's a video of a science reporter, Veritasium, staying in an anaechoic chamber for one hour, in the dark. Not only they do so at the first attempt, but they come out of it convinced they could have stayed indefinitely -- that there was no "driving crazy effect". Clearly this is weak evidence by scientific standards, but the evidence ...


72

The table provided is directly copied from page 173 of The Wisdom of Psychopaths. It explains the source is The Great British Psychopath Study, where self-selected people submit their own Levenson Self-Report Psychopathy Scale, and categorise themselves according to a list of a hundred or so occupations. The occupations listed notably do not include "...


58

"Smell" is a sense that is said to be more directly tied to emotional processing in the brain than other senses. But all interpretations of sensory information is subject to subjectivity. And smell is a sense that is easily and quickly dulled. Live in the stink and you get used to it, quickly. That makes it this a No. Smell is not objectively measurable as ...


47

In addition to the two versions of the claim in the question, the claim is repeated here by Andrew Solomon. I could not find other instances of the claim online. The article seems to have been presented at the NIMH (National Institute of Mental Health) Alliance for Research Progress Meeting. I was particularly taken by a study in which a group of ...


46

Human beings are really bad at picking random numbers. The reason is that we are hard-wired to identify patterns in nature -- even to the extent of seeing patterns where none exist. But while this helps us hunt (we are predators, after all, and the outline of an animal shape in the bushes means prey), we experience a cognitive dissonance when trying to ...


40

To be clear, science has thus far failed to produce reproducible experimental evidence demonstrating a statistically significant genetic predisposition to any sexuality or a lack of one. There are only theories, no consensus. This is part of a much larger problem dubbed "Nature vs. Nurture" that makes it extremely difficult to tell whether a great number of ...


38

Doesn't look like it. The most likely source of the quote is The Science of Swearing by Timothy Jay and Kristin Janschewitz or possibly Dr. Neel Burton's Hell Yes: The 7 Best Reasons for Swearing or possibly the summation by Psych2Go which draws on both of them: The basic premise that is put forth is that those who cuss are seen as more loyal, trustworthy,...


38

Studies The Standards of Care for the Health of Transsexual, Transgender, and Gender-Nonconforming People has a good summary of studies (starting at page 229 (PDF page 65)). All quotes are from the standard of care (not in order though), and I linked to those studies that I could find freely available online for easy reference. These studies measure more ...


36

Finally, someone has done a study that will provide an answer. The study, run by Dr Terri Fisher, asked 163 students to carry a tally counter, and note when they had thoughts about sex: It won't be published until January 2012 so I have had to rely on early press reports, such as this one in MedicalXpress: the research discredits the persistent ...


36

Here are the relevant paragraphs from the intro to the paywalled paper justifying the first line of the abstract: Over the years however, it has been acknowledged that right-wing authoritarianism is only one indicator of right-wing attitudes and that such attitudes can be arranged according to two broad dimensions (see, Duckitt & Sibley, 2009; ...


35

A recent study has suggested that effectiveness of placebo treatments increased over the years in the US, in patients suffering from neuropathic pain. Increasing placebo responses over time in U.S. clinical trials of neuropathic pain, Pain, December 2015 - Volume 156 - Issue 12 - p 2616–2626 doi: 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000333. The study itself uses data ...


33

A new study that I just found says that there apparently is no difference between pornography stars and the general population (i.e. the "damaged goods" hypothesis). From the abstract: The damaged goods hypothesis posits that female performers in the adult entertainment industry have higher rates of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), psychological problems, ...


30

YES That seems not only very plausible. There is very little reason to doubt. The actual, concrete picture may be just illustrative, manipulated, misattributed or the exact kindergarten picture untraceable on the net for authenticity. But why should it? The underlying concept and the actual use of this kind of tool in a preschool/kindergarten setting may ...


29

Yes for short term, probably not for long term. I think you somewhat answered this already, at least for short term mating/relationships (per Jonason). There does seem to be evidence that the "dark triad" personality provides an advantage when it comes to short term mating, but perhaps not for long term relationships. Jonason, et al. The Dark Triad: ...


26

TL;DR: The hypothesis is unfalsifiable, relies on confirmation bias and cherry picking of data, has no predictive or explanatory power (in fact, it makes post-hoc predictions), lacks any kind of controls... in every sense, it is pseudo-science. This question has been addressed quite thoroughly at the following locations: Debunking the Global ...


26

The author published a peer-review article with sources: Atheism, Secularity, and Well-Being: How the Findings of Social Science Counter Negative Stereotypes and Assumptions, Phil Zuckerman, Sociology Compass 3/6 (2009): 949–971, 10.1111/j.1751-9020.2009.00247.x But more significantly, when we actually compare the values and beliefs of atheists and ...


25

The evidence is quite overwhelming. See, for example, the Sleep Research section on my website. There, among other items, you will find a direct link to my article, "Sleep We Have Lost," in which I first published this discovery. there is every reason to believe that segmented sleep, such as many wild animals still exhibit, had long been the natural ...


25

I've been trying to answer some of the old, highly-voted unanswered questions recently - which brings me to this attempt to answer one of my own. This has been one of the less fun topics to research; some of the concepts below are distasteful (but not explicit.) Depends What 'Normal' Means It turns out I accidentally hit on a key issue in the question ...


25

No it is not. The definitive answer as to what is, or is not, a psychological disorder is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) (5th edition release has been delayed to 2013). A search of the document for the word "liberal" (with wildcards) only turns up three entries. Application of Trait Theory in ...


24

Reasons for switching? Generally today, in the western world, left-handed people are equally accepted as right-handed people and should not experience any major drawbacks. Today, a child can easily work with the left hand. Thanks to some tools such as scissors, writing pads and pens for left-handed no problems are expected. If a child does have bad deal, ...


23

There's an interesting recent paper by Spencer and Bryne (2016), which may shed some light on this, but also raises more questions. It seems that at least in a "typical" corporate structure, there is more psychopathy at the top level... but this seems to have no real impact on the employees' job satisfaction. Finally, there was a huge bias towards men in the ...


21

A lot of the discussion on this topic was provoked by a peer-reviewed study published in 2012. Quoting from the abstract: We proposed and tested mediation models in which lower cognitive ability predicts greater prejudice, an effect mediated through the endorsement of right-wing ideologies (social conservatism, right-wing authoritarianism) and low ...


20

Is torture useful in interrogation? Is it feasible to torture accurate information out of people? Is it feasible to determine whether the information is likely accurate without outside confirmation? If torture is used then it is sometimes useful. Information obtained from torture may or may not be accurate, and requires outside confirmation. Can ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible