129

YES, there is some truth behind the "1 billion heartbeats " claim. And when I say "some" I mean the creator of the comic didn't just make it up out of thin air. While it's not literally true that all animals get 1 billion heartbeats before they die, a relation between metabolic rate (which is related to heart rate) and life span has been observed. San José ...


101

If Homer talks about the dark-wine sea, it seems he also talks about the "blue eyebrows of Poseidon". You can read here about Homer's colorful descriptions that helped orators remember the verses of his poems. κυανό is known to be "blue" for ancient greeks and became "cyan" in english. In this book about Homer writing, κυανό entry represents "smalt, blue ...


89

The first claim is based on the research of Berlin and Kay "Basic Color Terms", which posits the hypothesis that languages evolve colour terms in the following order, and therefore that ancient languages did not possess separate terms for blue and green: Stage I: Dark-cool and light-warm Stage II: Red Stage III: Either green or yellow Stage IV: Both green ...


71

What do we mean by weaker, or by stronger? "Women really are stronger than men, according to study" Is the title of a BBC article which says A recent academic study has shown that under extreme conditions such as famines, epidemics and enslavement, women are able to survive for longer than men. Across modern populations, women outlive men in ...


67

According to the Wikipedia article (with sources), not even bra manufacturers claim that bras prevent saggy breasts. Now, this is of course not conclusive. I have found two studies, that go further and claim that wearing no bra actually trains the chest muscles, making the breasts firmer and thus prevent sagging. The first is a Japanese study, Breast form ...


65

Yes, that's Andre's hand. This image was part of the cover spread for a biographical article "To the Giant among us" in Sports Illustrated in 1981. The full cover spread includes regular-sized hands pouring a beer for comparison: The full article text for To The Giant Among Us is available on sports illustrated's vault.


61

See Genital Anatomy in Pregnant Adolescents: “Normal” Does Not Mean “Nothing Happened” Pediatrics, January 2004, volume 113, pages e67-e69. METHODS The purpose of this study was to summarize the medical history and genital examination findings in 36 adolescents who were pregnant at the time of, or shortly before, their sexual abuse examination. The ...


60

No, this is not true. Not even for just India, as Indian cobra (Naja naja) has round pupils and subcaudal (tail) scales are divided. There is also no pit visible. It is venomous species of snake. This answer assumes, that author means venomous snakes instead of poisonous, as this is common mistake. Also, Wikipedia should have enough credibility for this ...


58

In short, we can assume that they do. There are two layers to this problem: whether crustaceans experience stimuli which could correspond to pain if those stimuli are effectively pain The second question is really hard to answer, and I would say, fundamentally philosophical. When does rubbing become scratching? So please bear in mind that I would find ...


58

"Smell" is a sense that is said to be more directly tied to emotional processing in the brain than other senses. But all interpretations of sensory information is subject to subjectivity. And smell is a sense that is easily and quickly dulled. Live in the stink and you get used to it, quickly. That makes it this a No. Smell is not objectively measurable as ...


57

No. Here are excerpts from an article written for Psychology Today The Rare Truth About "Tight" and "Loose" Women Post published by Michael Castleman M.A. on Sep 16, 2011 in All About Sex Many women complain that their vaginas are "too tight" or "too loose," and many men raise the issue about lovers. Notions of vaginal tightness and ...


56

This calculation is pretty much worst-case for the bicycle. It doesn't take into account that food production has actually stored CO2 from the atmosphere which is now just released back, while fuel was originally underground and its CO2 is added to the carbon cycle. Neither does it take into account mercury/other emissions, nor the wear-and-tear in cars and ...


52

We just need to look at sled dogs and do a little math. In 1986, Susan Butcher broke Rick Swenson’s record, set in 1981, by completing the 1049+ miles in 11 days. 1049/11 = 95 miles per day. This dwarfs a marathon, and marathon runners don't pull sleds. However, there are other races where we manage 71ish miles per day. This is for the Self-...


52

A “newton” is the international unit of force. A human adult’s maximum biting force ranges from 520-1,178 newtons depending on factors such as age and gender. It requires less than 200 newtons to bite through a raw carrot. This is well within the normal limits of the average person. Biting through a finger requires so much force that attempts often lead to ...


50

People have used chess as a model for studying stress responses and therefore have done a detailed metabolic analysis. The key data is in table 1 (p. 347); here it is, reformatted and converted to Calories/hr: Energy expended (Cal/hr) Before Beginning Middle End ------------------------ ----------- ----------- ----------- ----------- Mean ...


50

Yes, we are taller in the morning. From The transformation of spinal curvature into spinal deformity (2005): The effects of gravity on the upright human posture are powerful: Individuals are as much as 25 mm taller in the morning than in the evening (1)(2), as a result of compressive forces bearing down all day, And astronauts 'grow' by nearly ...


45

What happens is not due to some stickiness inherent to electricity, but rather, the electric shock causes your muscles to involuntarily contract. If you're unlucky, such a contraction could effect a firm grip around the electric source, which would render you unable to let go of it. All about circuits elaborates: The forearm muscles responsible for ...


45

Of all the ways to knock someone out, a karate chop to the neck is one of the least effective and least reliable ways to do it. Actually, significant impact to the neck and cervical spine is probably more likely to result in serious neurological consequences such as paralysis rather than a simple knockout as shown on tv. How could a karate chop knock ...


45

Here is one clue. Visit the IAAF's page of athletic records and compare the men's and women's, category by category. No woman on record has cracked the 10 second barrier for 100 meters. No woman on record has yet cracked the four minute mile. Male high school students regularly beat the female world record mile run time of just under 4:13. 4 American male ...


40

No. An "undigested protein stuck in our tissues and cells" implies that somehow untouched proteins (polymer chains made of amino acids linked together by peptide bonds) get through the process of digestion unscathed and are absorbed into the bloodstream. This doesn't happen, and someone would have to have some very serious problems with their entire ...


40

I remember learning the tongue map in school, but it's a myth. From The New York Times: In a study published in the journal Nature in 2006, a team of scientists reported that receptors for the basic tastes are found in distinct cells, and that these cells are not localized but spread throughout the tongue. That said, other studies suggest ...


39

I am not sure where these numbers come from and the answer depends on how you encode the genome data and if you define all the redundancy (unnecessary, repetitive data) as "information". First of all, the humane genome contains somewhere around 3.1 (men) to 3.2 (women) billion base pairs. Since the X chromosome is three times longer than the Y chromosome, ...


38

No From the Library of Congress: Dr. Block said that what is called the Valsalva maneuver, the creation of positive pressure in the chest when sneezing or coughing, is a complex and fairly violent physiological process. It may change the rhythm of the heart beat, he said, but it does not stop the heart. So where did the myth originate that your ...


35

Edit: I've looked into this and am updating it to the full answer. Here goes... Re. Habermas and his claims in particular I emailed the source of these claims, Dr. Habermas, to try and obtain the "list of over one-hundred evidential cases" he refers to in his debates/talks. He did not have such a list (I can provide the exact email if requested). He ...


33

In movies, knocking someone unconscious can look like this: It can be a PG-13 way to take care of a bad guy, who wakes up sometime later with only a headache. (However, more realistic depictions can be found, usually in war movies.) In real life, it looks more like this: What isn't shown is that in reality a person knocked unconscious is usually knocked ...


33

First, the evidence that this position actually works and has been used in practice comes from the 1942 book Get Tough! How to Win in Hand-to-Hand Fighting, as Taught to the British Commandos, and the U.S. Armed Forces by then-Captain W.E. Fairbairn. The technique is called the Grape Vine, and is described on page 37. The relevant passage can currently be ...


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