259

The metric does not measure what it is claimed it does, and even if it did it would be meaningless for assessing the role of Dr. Kate Bouman in creating the image. I'll go on to why, but I first want to draw particularly attention to the fact that Dr. Bouman has explicitly rejected the idea that she deserves sole credit: But Dr Bouman, now an assistant ...


132

Technically, that is the percentage of the code she contributed, 2410 lines in 90 commits. From https://github.com/achael/eht-imaging/graphs/contributors But that tells us nothing about what the code does. Andrew Chael, the man who is credited with doing the work in that article, has spoken up against the rhetoric used against her. From https://www....


113

Yes, most modern computer processors include hardware with the capability to fully control all components of the computer (regardless of the power state of the system as a whole), to access all data while the computer is running, and to connect to the internet (in any power state). However, the remote control aspect of the functionality this hardware ...


65

It is true that you do not need numbers, special characters, etc for a strong password. If you instead increase the length of the password, the entropy will increase as well. See for example this entropy table. To get 64 bit of entropy, you could have a 14 character lowercase password, or you could have a 10 character password with all printable ASCII ...


41

The old title asked "Did researcher Katie Bouman only contribute 0.26% of code that created Black Hole image," and the existing answers do a good job explaining why it isn't true and why lines of code aren't a useful metric. The new title, however, asks "Was credit for the black hole image misappropriated?" and the correct answer should appear rather ...


35

According to Quote Investigator, the evidence is inconclusive. In 1985 InfoWorld quoted him as saying When we set the upper limit of PC-DOS at 640K, we thought nobody would ever need that much memory. (The quote was not sourced) The way I would interpret this is that he thought PCs and PC-DOS would be dead before the memory limit would be a problem. This ...


28

The claim is false. The soldier does not have evidence of unlicensed software. The claims are based entirely on photographs and witness statements from an anonymous source. There are a number of problems with the claim: The photos show computers which have not been activated. This is not the same thing as unlicensed. The US Army negotiates to license ...


27

It's likely a scam: Apple's products have fixed prices and, for example, a MD711CH costs around 1000US$ in China: Also, there is a large "fakes" industry in China. They even have tons of fake Apple stores!


26

The story with regards Bill Gates scheduling classes is true, although if this would be considered "tampering" is best left to the reader. According to Bill Gates, he actually wrote a computerized class scheduler for Lackside School in which he included an extra feature, Of course, a whole new dimension of relevance came when I was asked to do a ...


22

Brian Krebs (noted and respected infosec analyst and blogger) reported this on 27th Jan. 27 Jan 18 First ‘Jackpotting’ Attacks Hit U.S. ATMs ATM “jackpotting” — a sophisticated crime in which thieves install malicious software and/or hardware at ATMs that forces the machines to spit out huge volumes of cash on demand — has long been a threat for ...


20

This article claims that in 2010, the "Bill Of Material" for the cheapest MacBook Air was $718. So if, for example, Foxconn decided to buy some extra parts and do an extra shift to produce some MacBook Airs on their own and sold them at cost, they would cost $718. The Bill Of Materials has probably gone down since then, but even so there is no way that a ...


19

No, the text was not generated entirely by a computer program. Humans worked with the algorithm to generate the sentences, selected the ones they liked best, edited them into a story, and even added some of their own. Botnik's tweet describes their code as "predictive keyboards"--the same sort of technology that phones without full keyboards use to guess ...


17

Is there evidence to support that the decrease in time slice duration causes the dramatic battery use increase claimed in the article? Yes. Quoting a technical paper released by Microsoft as part of their hardware developer documentation, Timers, Timer Resolution, and Development of Efficient Code: If the system timer interval is decreased to less ...


17

SUMMARY: No, it does not make your computer hardware run any faster. It may make the common software applications they provide for you run faster, depending on how your old machine is configured. As indicated in their How It Works page, it is actually a USB key holding a Live USB Linux Distribution. There is thus no hardware involved to make the computer ...


16

The Register article was most likely a feed from this very brief and unsourced InformationWeek article, dated two days before the article in The Register. The story has the ring of urban legend to it. People who work behind the scenes have sometimes gruesome stories about lost equipment, lost machinery, and even lost people showing up years after the fact. ...


16

The "damage" done by screens is in the form of eye strain. Your eyeball focuses by using muscles in the eye to change the shape of the lens within the eye, to properly focus incoming light onto the correct portion of the retina. It is the second part of your eye, after the cornea, that helps to focus light and images on your retina. Because the lens is ...


16

I found a full account of pre-computerized reservation systems on Wikipedia's Reservisor article. The account is sourced to a single book, which I cannot get due to worldwide library closures, but compared to the accounts in the question it has far more details on what made the binoculars necessary. At the time, bookings were handled by a system known as &...


14

Yes. But let's keep PNG or JPG out of the picture since they're quite complex formats. If we'd talk about a simple bitmap it's much easier. If you keep increasing one number (1, 2, 3, 4) and then another number everytime from 1 up to that number you get a sequence like this: 1 1 2 1 2 2 3 1 3 2 3 3 4 1 ... This is respectively the width and height of your ...


14

"Sleep mode" (on a computer or notebook) is a term that can hold different meaning. Generally it is considered S3 as defined by the ACPI specification, otherwise called "suspend-to-RAM," where your computer's RAM remains powered (let's call it charged) so that everything your computer is "thinking" at the time it entered sleep mode, it will resume thinking ...


13

Windows 10 recognizes SSDs and treats them differently than standard HDDs, meaning that there is actually no risk on damaging your SSD. To quote Scott Hanselman No, Windows is not foolishly or blindly running a defrag on your SSD every night, and no, Windows defrag isn't shortening the life of your SSD unnecessarily. Modern SSDs don't work the same ...


13

There is no single right answer to how much entropy a password has: the result will depend on the assumptions the attacker will make about it, and these are unknown. More or less reasonable guesses can be made about these assumptions, giving more or less reasonable entropy values. This article at explainxkcd covers the comic in question. It explains the ...


13

Your own article cites its source, which in similar form is a collection of "interesting" outcomes of machine learning experiments. The relevant portion is here: when MIT Lincoln Labs evaluated GenProg on a buggy sorting program, researchers created tests that measured whether the numbers output by the sorting algorithm were in sorted order. However, ...


12

This question is ultimately a matter of opinion - here are the opinions of a number of relevant experts: Scott Aaronson, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, On the one hand, the widespread praise for this reply surely says more about how low the usual standards for politicians are, and about Trudeau’s fine comic ...


11

Make your own conclusion from the sources mentioned This is evidence showing that using face-to-screen electronics before going to bed could harm your sleep. For instance, this study, published in the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes found that smartphone use after 9 p.m. was associated with decreased sleep quantity at night. ...


11

Kyle McDonald wrote a Python script that dumps basic statistics information from GitHub for all the Deep Learning Toolkit projects that are included in this list. This Reddit comment, from November 10, 2015, describes the script, and summarises the results: From 2010-2015 a new toolkit was released every 47 days. This year, it's every 22 days. The ...


11

Let me answer the actual question: Is it true that the Intel Management Engine, and/or similar components in other brands of processor, can connect autonomously to the internet when the computer is powered off? In case of ME, the answer is "maybe, in some cases, but usually no". First, there is a question of what specific kind of ME you have. There ...


10

However, from Fox this is now 3rd hand information The article links (in the 4th paragraph) to the original article from Der Spiegel which is available online for free and in English: Der Spiegel: Inside TAO: Documents Reveal Top NSA Hacking Unit I wondered about credibility of such a document that the news article itself does not identify Der ...


10

That is incorrect. It might be true that Microsoft pioneered commercial applications of Deep Learning though, which is what I suspect Bill was getting at. Li Deng, who works for Microsoft Research, took the Deep Belief Nets (DBNs), devised by Hinton and his team at the University of Toronto, and applied them (successfully) to the TIMIST dataset for speech ...


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