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I think the answer depends on what you mean by your question, which you stated as: Is it "a known risk that people are dying of starvation because we cannot produce enough food"? As is often the case, we'll need to go into what some of those terms mean. To start with, the risk part you quote is certainly an unlucky choice; if people are dying of starvation,...


13

Issue: Whether organic vegetables are comparably more carcinogenic to vegetables treated with pesticides? Evidence: Research shows that numerous chemicals present in natural products tested positive in the Ames test which is a biological test used to detect chemicals that are mutagenic. These chemicals also tested positive in tests for cancer using ...


13

Jean Ziegler says, that 12 billion people could be fed by the world production. This is also written in the fact sheet for the right of food of the Office of the High Commissioner of Human Rights: "One might think that people are denied their right to food because there is not enough food to go round. However, according to FAO, the world produces enough ...


13

No. Your first question was to define what organic farming means. The definition given by the United States Environmental Protection Agency is "Organically grown" food is food grown and processed using no synthetic fertilizers or pesticides. Pesticides derived from natural sources (such as biological pesticides) may be used in producing organically ...


7

The claim that organic cotton farming uses less water than conventional modes of farming appears to be the scientific consensus. For instance, Grose (2009) states that [farmers] in Israel have reported that cotton grown under organic conditions requires 30% less water than water in conventional systems […]. Organic cotton farmers in Texas have reported ...


7

Obviously whether they are "safe" is a subjective standard, so unless you quantify it, the title question is unanswerable. Here is an article from http://foodsafety.gov, which is published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which discusses the risks of bacterial contamination in sprouts. It contains a recommendation which echoes your ...


6

TL;DR: There is not a great deal of difference about organic milk when compared to conventionally produced milk in terms of nutrients once the different factors that influence milk production were compared or adjusted from a 2015 review of close to 200 publications. Therefore in terms of nutrients in milk, there is nothing distinct about organic milk that ...


5

It is indeed the case that most of the problems with malnutrition and hunger throughout the world are political and social problems and not that we don't produce enough food. In the Coursera course A Brief History of Humankind Yuval Noah Harari Ph.D, a professor at the University of Jerusalem claims that we have a food distribution problem. At least in the ...


5

Possibly, but not likely There is an older study mentioned in this 1985 Chicago Tribune article that states that and extremely high dose of Vitamin C followed by eating shrimp may result in "trivalent arsenic" being converted from the compounds in shrimp. "What the Illinois researchers found is that high doses of vitamin C convert the pentavalent compounds ...


4

Yes. Ingested pesticides are detectable in urine samples which is shown by studies such as Pesticide residues in urine of adults living in the United States: reference range concentrations Robert H. Hill, 1995 We measured 12 analytes in urine of 1000 adults living in the United States to establish reference range concentrations for pesticide residues. ...


4

The intended meaning of the quote you supplied is surely that if the outside of layer of a fruit or vegetable is commonly consumed then this would be taken in to account when setting a maximum residue level (MRL). Zest of lemon and orange is commonly consumed and therefore those fruits must reasonably be included in the Food Standards Agency's claims about ...


4

Broadly yes, You lose most of the fibre present in the fruit, fibre is important for digestion and likely has other benefits (http://www.nhs.uk/chq/pages/1141.aspx?categoryid=51), it also helps slow the absorption of the sugar in the fruit as the gut cannot digest fibre. The vitamin/mineral compositions also change in processing and storage, the process of ...


3

Depends on the food-- Organic Tomatoes have more Vitamin C A large review in 2006 showed that different vegetables have different contents depending on the farming practices used (ie, organic vs non-organic). Most helpful here, including sources, is Table 2 of that study. In that table, the following statements describe the results of various fruits and ...


3

In addition to @pericles316's detailed answer, Summary: As I understand Ames (cited paper and a letter, see below), there are indeed cases where plants bred for increased resistance with the intent of avoiding man-made pesticides had to be withdrawn from the market because of acute toxicity to humans. Ames does not claim that all (nor on average, nor ...


2

In France, the difference between a natural and an artificial aromas is the simple 2-letter word "de": for a natural aroma, "arôme de truffe" is written on the label (i.e. aroma from truffles), whereas for artificial aroma, "arôme truffe" (i.e. truffle aroma) is indicated. According to the DGCCRF (French national agency for consumers and against frauds) ...


2

Per Raffaele Porta et al. in 2013, edible coatings was to found be extremely advantageous to preserve the characteristics of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables at their peak. A review of various preservative treatments for color preservation and preventing texture loss in fresh cut fruit and vegetables can be found here. "Different technologies have been so ...


2

I have been intensely researching this subject, and I have found several of the same claims from several different places. The fact is that Polonium 210 (210Po) is a very radioactive agent. The tobacco plant readily absorbs the 210Po because it mistakes it for a nutrient that it needs. Phosphate fertilizers, which are used by all of the major commercial ...


2

No, it hasn't. A team led by Bravata, a senior affiliate with Stanford’s Center for Health Policy, and Crystal Smith-Spangler, MD, MS, an instructor in the school’s Division of General Medical Disciplines and a physician-investigator at VA Palo Alto Health Care System, did the most comprehensive meta-analysis to date of existing studies comparing ...


1

The basis of most of the grass-fed claims I've heard are based on the fact that the natural grass-based diet in cows and other ruminants leads to a much higher level of Conjugated Linoleic Acids (CLAs) in the foods derived from them. So, two questions have to be addressed to this specific claim - 1) Is the CLA content (and other anti-oxidants if you want to ...


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