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131

Sweetened condensed milk is made by evaporating some of the water from milk and adding sugar. So yes it does contain milk as your wikipedia link in your original question stated. The article that you link to though appears to be a bad translation of what officials are saying. According to The Jakarta Post condensed milk or sweetened condensed milk may no ...


101

The factory owners certainly did not start the habits of English workers to drink their tea with milk to speed up the breaks. That is a bogus claim incompatible with recorded history. Perhaps there were a few factory owners that made the observation that tea cooling faster might reduce time spent on breaks and thus wanted their workers to add milk in any ...


50

The article doesn't link to the Mother Jones article that spawned it, but it's here. The article makes several points: Consuming dairy has to be done carefully by people who are lactose-intolerant (a condition more common among blacks and Asians than among whites) Dairy doesn't reduce the incidence of osteoporosis, which blacks are less likely to get. ...


44

We can debunk this just by analysing the claim: "White blood cells", despite their name, are the cells responsible for the immune system, and occur throughout the body (see reference number 2). Also called leukocytes, the presence of these cells is not an indication that blood (or pus) is present. The claim actually says "all cows milk contains them". So ...


30

In this Nature Genetics paper, Gene-culture coevolution between cattle milk protein genes and human lactase genes Nature Genetics 35, 311 - 313 (2003), the variants in Cattle milk proteins and Human lactase persistence genes were analysed. (Lactase persistence means that adults can keep digesting lactose, while normally the lactase gene switches off after ...


28

There has been a similar debate in the UK (for an argument in favor see here). Moreover few doubt that unpasteurised milk tastes much more pleasant and it may even be more nutritious (for the nutrition argument see here). Beware, though, of some of the positive health claims made by the "raw milk" movement as they smack of the lack of skeptical analysis ...


28

There is a possibility of death due to injury and eventual infection if a dairy cow is not milked. Many wild or "less-domesticated" (if you'll allow) breeds of cattle, bison and other bovines don't suffer from the same danger. Immediately, the real problem is that the udders will swell and cause the cow severe pain and stress if not released. Generally the ...


28

Notwithstanding the @Legion600 's answer to the implicit question, I just wanted to be clear: Yes. Condensed milk contains milk At the very least, Nestle Carnation Milk contains milk, sugar and nothing else. According to their product website: Sweet and deliciously creamy, Carnation® Condensed Milk is made from all natural ingredients. Made with ...


26

EDIT 2013/05/21 The CDC recently released statistics for the first time on raw milk consumption, and raw milk-related illnesses. They also released their own conclusions, which, ironically, don't match their own data. However, an article released a couple weeks ago, Raw Milk Reality: Is Raw Milk Dangerous? attempts to examine the best numbers available ...


22

Source - How to make a Perfect Cup of Tea, Royal Society of Chemistry Milk should be added before the tea, because denaturation (degradation) of milk proteins is liable to occur if milk encounters temperatures above 75°C. If milk is poured into hot tea, individual drops separate from the bulk of the milk and come into contact with the high ...


21

"Milk contains blood" is a metonymical exaggeration for the correct idea that milk contains some of the same components as blood. The word for a whole ("blood") is wrongly being used to denote only a part ("white blood cell") giving rise something reminiscent of this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fallacy_of_composition


21

The prescriptionist scientist in me rejects the question as meaningless! The descriptivist in me compels me to try to answer the question you meant to ask. Both whole milk and skim milk (in the USA) may be fortified with vitamins A and/or D. Sharon Gerdes wrote in Dairy Foods (Feb 2009): The dairy industry has been adding vitamin D3 to milk since 1932. ...


21

It usually does. There can be no definitive answer because as noted in the 14th edition of A Complete Course in Canning and Related Processes there's no international standard for condensed milk. So it depends on the national/regional standards how much milk must there be in it. But the book does give some usual industry figures: In the manufacturing of ...


19

There are local hot spots if you don't mix the milk after microwaving. Babies really do get burned by microwaved milk; there is an actual danger the medical community is trying to prevent when giving advice not to microwave milk. The danger is due to a combination of hot spots within the milk and the container being cooler than the milk itself. If ...


18

There is no reason to believe that casein cannot be digested by children or adults. From "Gastrojejunal kinetics and the digestion of [15N]beta-lactoglobulin and casein in humans: the influence of the nature and quantity of the protein" (page 550) casein was slowly recovered in the jejunum mainly in the form of degraded peptides efficiently absorbed in ...


17

Generally agree with @Malvolio's answer, though to expand on a claim within the article as requested: "a strong correlation to calcium consumption and an increased risk of prostate cancer, unproportionally affecting African men. Furthermore, both black children and adults generally secrete less calcium on a daily basis than white people, making them less ...


16

It's bad for most cats. To digest lactose, mammals require the enzyme lactase. As mammals grow to adults, lactase production decreases (as you would expect after weaning). Cow's milk contains much more lactose than cat's milk. Undigested lactose leads to diarrhea. Severe diarrhea can be fatal. Cats and Dairy Fact 1: Lactose Intolerance Is the Norm ...


15

The Wikipedia article List of common misconceptions states: Drinking milk or consuming other dairy products does not increase mucus production. As a result, they do not need to be avoided by those suffering from flu or cold congestion. They back it up with this article: Pinnock CB, Graham NM, Mylvaganam A, Douglas RM. Relationship between milk intake ...


15

This myth appears to stem from The Talmud - a vast collection of Jewish laws and traditions. Although modern-day medicine and science may beg to differ, the sages of the Talmud were under the impression that eating fish and meat together is extremely dangerous to one’s health. In fact, in those days, there was actually a dermatological condition which was ...


14

Cancer There is a study by Dr Ganmaa Davaasambuu et al at Harvard dated 2002 which links hormones in milk with increased risk of certain cancers. Among the food items examined, milk (1961-90) was most closely correlated with prostate cancer incidence (r = 0.711), followed by meat (0.642) and coffee (0.606) Dr Davaasambuu's study cites Davies TW, ...


14

Yes. The demonstration of this fact is actually a famous anecdote in the history of statistics. Ronald A. Fisher, one of the towering figures in the history of statistics, gave the case as an example in the second chapter of his book The Design of Experiments (1951), without mentioning it being based on a true story. Some references can be found on the ...


14

TLDR It depends. Evidence suggests that many cats at least, can drink milk in some forms, particularly unpasteurized milk. There was a famous series of studies done on, among other things, cats and milk consumption, by Dr. Francis Pottinger, in the 1930s and 1940s. As the study has been around so long, the results have been analyzed time and again, and you ...


14

Does drinking more than 3 glasses of milk a day double your risk of death? The study was not designed to answer this question The claim in your question title and in the headline of the Cleveland Clinic blog you linked ("Can Drinking Too Much Milk Make Your Bones More Brittle?") are both about causality. The study your question and this blog post are about ...


13

As seen in this experiment milk curdles when lemon juice is added (due to the acid): Orange juice has a pH level of about 3 so that could curdle the milk. But gastric acid has a pH level of 1.5 - 3 Conclusion: Due to the gastric acid milk would curdle in your stomach anyway.


13

This is one of the most ridiculous claims I have ever seen. First of all, there is not just one casein, caseins are a family of proteins. Caseins are found in mammals milk in different proportion, generally quite high (that is why they are called caseins, from the Latin caseus, meaning cheese). As the other answer points out, almost 50% of the protein ...


12

Yes. The medical term for lactation outside of pregnancy and childbirth is galactorrhea. It has been observed in males(1)(2). In newborns, it is relativity common in both sexes, and is called "witch's milk."(3) Prolactin is the hormone associated with lactation and it is secreted by the anterior pituitary gland.(4) The causes are varied. According to the ...


12

The origin of this story seems to be a letter sent to the weird news journal Fortean Times in 1999: FT129: I’ve just learned a truly horrifying thing, and one which I didn’t believe until I tried it for myself. It was told to me by a work colleague, a keen cook, who wasn’t at all amazed when he discovered it. Perhaps the best way of experiencing the ...


11

There is little evidence to support the effectiveness of nutritional supplements or the GFCF diet for improving ASD symptoms. A dairy-free, gluten-free diet for autistic kids is called GFCF (Gluten-Free, Casein-Free). Parents do often report improvements in behavior after diet change. Currently, there are several reviews that suggest that these improvements ...


11

I will answer with a Polish source but there are also traces of "Bavarian" tea and its history in other languages (mostly French and German as its source is either Bavarian princes in Paris or French masterchiefs in Bavaria). In Domy i dwory ["Houses and Mansions"], Łukasz Gołębiowski wrote in 1830: herbatę, którą w Paryżu wprowadzono w 1656, pijano na ...


10

TL;DR: No, there is no lactase in raw milk. No, there are no probiotic organisms in raw milk that produce lactase. Some (named) lactase-producing microorganisms are added to yoghurt. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have issued a statement about Raw Milk. Raw Milk Misconceptions and the Danger of Raw Milk Consumption: There is no indigenous ...


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