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83

From watching the video (and pausing it at 15 seconds), I saw that the detector had the label DT-1130 printed on the front of it. Google turned up that this was an HDE product, product code HDE-S73, as seen for sale here: DT-1130 50Hz - 2000Hz Electromagnetic Radiation Detector EMF Nuclear Gamma Microwave Exposure Detector. The product description (which I ...


53

The 'cactus absorb radiation' meme is very widespread, but seems very short on detailed analysis. So let's start with some basic facts. None of the articles are explicit about what radiation they are talking about. However the only significant radiation emitted by computer monitors is electromagnetic radiation, which is all around us all the time, and in ...


47

Yes, it is perfectly safe. The United States FDA provides the following information. Q8: Is it safe to eat food, drink beverages, use medicine, or apply cosmetics if any of these products have gone through a cabinet x-ray system? A8: There are no known adverse effects from eating food, drinking beverages, using medicine, or applying cosmetics that ...


46

The use of Carbon-14 for dating is not completely precise. In general, 500 years is the minimum and 50,000 years is the maximum due to the need to calibrate for background C-14 levels, and to have sufficient breakdown to establish the half-life proportions but not so much that the sample is too small to measure. That said, they're using Carbon-14 dating on ...


43

I would say this is Not True Just going by the sentence you’ve highlighted: Health experts believe this increased exposure to 5G will have a devastating impact on our health. It’s already doubtful. Who are these so-called “health experts”? Why do they believe this? If we look at the National Cancer Institute's page specifically for cellular RF and its ...


35

Norwegian science journalist Gunnar Tjomlid published an article [Norwegian language] in the online newspaper Nettavisen. Blogger Pepijn van Erp summarised it in English. In brief, the experiment was not properly controlled, not blinded, had publication bias, was misreported, had faulty statistical analysis, had bias in the methodology and relied on a ...


29

This "Bioguard X" bracelet is a hoax. The Ministry of Health Israel has issued a statement (translated from Hebrew) saying: The Ministry of Health would like to inform the public that after inspecting the information about the Bioguard X bracelet as claimed by the manufacturer, no evidence was found for any health benefit of the product. The bracelet ...


28

The radiation is 1000 times stronger According to Wikipedia The transmission power of a GSM handset is limited to a maximum of 2 watts in GSM 850/900 and 1 watt in GSM 1800/1900. According to a Radio-Electronics.com article "GSM Power Control and Power Class" the base station controls handset power output in the range 2-19 which is 39 dBm to 5 dBm. ...


25

In the comments, Gary Kindel, pointed out, "Just answer the question and stop worrying who is going to use to support a specific dating technique." So the short answer is yes, radioactivity can and does affect radiometric dating techniques. This is a well established phenomenon and as such, there are many other dating methods that make up for this. There ...


24

Simple calculations suggest this story is nonsense. I'm not an expert in radiative physics but I can see from simple calculations that the story has strayed beyond the bounds of plausibility. The first, very simple, calculation is to look at the total power used if 200 mobile phones (a very full train carriage) were being used at the same time. I'm going to ...


24

Seems to be true about a large number of suddenly dead birds. There are some articles in Dutch media reporting this. However the cause has not been determined and there is no mention of 5G antennas in reports. Mysterie rond dode vogels ("Mystery around dead birds") Tientallen spreeuwen in Huijgenspark Den Haag sterven mysterieuze dood ("Dozens of starlings ...


23

I'm guessing it's based on the paper From the mass of the neutrino to the dating of wine from scientists at the Centre Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan: This technique has therefore led to the possibility to date the wine bottles having vintage between 1950 and 1980 or at least to control the year written on the label or on the cork. Furthermore, ...


21

Long story short, this is utter nonsense. As guildsbounty's answer mentions, this thing claims a range of 50 Hz - 2 GHz. That's just an RF (radio frequency) broadband detector. Using a broadband detector to detect RF (or lower frequency) emissions from electronics is perfectly legitimate, but detecting emissions doesn't mean it's dangerous. The American ...


18

It doesn't seem that any cancer victims have yet been identified. The probabilities are low and are assessed over the whole lifetime of people in the worst affected areas. It won't be possible to identify specific people whose cancer is attributable to the Fukushima Daiichi accident. At best, large scale studies may be able to measure the small increase in ...


15

Is his reading accurate? Most likely, yes. There's quite a lot of naturally occurring uranium, thorium and radium in California. As Thunderf00t (Phil Mason) points out in his video, Panic as Fukushima radiation 'found' on Californian beach, magnetic black sand is well known for containing elements like thorium, and you can see the CPM rise when the man ...


13

Dental X-rays are not 100% free of risk. However, they are very, very low risk. Given people take risks with radiation every day (going into the sun, eating bananas), it is reasonable to accept the risks of dental X-rays to gain the health benefits associated with their diagnostic abilities. This xkcd info-graphic puts the risk in perspective - click to ...


13

Per World Nuclear Organization, there have been no deaths or cases of radiation sickness from the nuclear accident at Fukushima, but over 100,000 people had to be evacuated from their homes to ensure this. It states "There have been no harmful effects from radiation on local people, nor any doses approaching harmful levels. Government nervousness delays ...


13

Seeing this question pop up again, I want to share something. I did not write an answer before because I did not want to dig up an old question without a conclusive answer. While the claim is reported in Quartz, it is actually somebody else's. Tara Swart's ("a senior lecturer at MIT specializing in sleep and the brain," according to Quartz). So in addition ...


13

Summary: This paper is emerging science, and it is too soon to know one way or the other. "Has the fallout from American nuclear tests killed hundreds of thousands of civilians as the paper suggests?" This is emerging science and I am unqualified to critique the methods of the paper. When I am faced with a question about emerging science, I go through a ...


12

Alcohol may in fact make radiation poisoning worse. Though red wine specifically may give a slight boost that can be further improved by removing the alcohol entirely. according to this study: Consumption of dealcoholised red wine significantly decreased the gamma radiation-induced DNA damage at 1 and 2 h post-consumption by 20%. In contrast alcohol ...


12

Firstly, "Counts per minute" is essentially meaningless since every device registers counts differently. As Wikipedia points out; Counts are only manifested in the reading of the measuring instrument, and are not an absolute measure of the strength of the source of radiation. Whilst an instrument can display at a rate of cpm, it does not have to ...


12

Another benefit is that it will block alpha radiation (helium nuclei) and most of beta radiation (electrons). You can read more here. Of course, this will have no significative benefit.


12

Though tin foil hats do protect you from electromagnetic radiation and from some forms of ionizing radiation, they do not protect you from all possible electromagnetic radiation: In a not-too-serious-studyRead the conclusion first, it was found that tin foil hats actually amplify frequency bands that coincide with those allocated to the US government ...


10

No, at least according to the information presented in the source they reference, which just doesn't actually attempt to establish any correlation. http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/english/news/20151020_34.html Ministry experts determined that he was likely to have contracted leukemia following cleanup work at Fukushima Daiichi. They found he had been ...


10

The Claim I'm challenging: this article claims that an "expert" says it's fine. Sasa Mutic is a PhD in radiooncology and the chair of the radiation safety committee at Washington School of Medicine. So his credentials as an expert check out, and I can't find any sources indicating he didn't say it's fine. So I'd say the article's claim is true. But I ...


9

The paper you link to (Health Phys. 2010 Aug;99(2):105-23.) is a projection using estimates of radiation doses and estimates from other sources to find additional cancers. The doses come from a paper published simultaneously (Health Phys. 2010 Aug;99(2):157-200.) with similar authors. Such studies may be the best you can do when the effect is relatively ...


8

According to this blog, PIP strongly resembles false-color images: None of the sites promoting PIP offer peer-reviewed studies, show any consideration of the possibility of such artifacts, or show evidence of consistency of multiple scans taken with the client (after stepping briefly away and back to the apparatus) in the same condition. Whatever ...


8

When one reviews the comments of the Director General report of IAEA in Aug 2015 to the Tsuda et.al's study, there are valid issues noted which will need to be addressed in the future by Tsuda et.al regarding children living near the Fukushima nuclear meltdown affected by thyroid cancers at a rate 20 to 50 times when compared to children elsewhere . ...


8

Resonant Cavity Resonance will turn out to be one important factor that could cause increased radiation at certain spots, so let's take a minute to understand this. The same effect that we observe in resonant cavity with microwaves is observed with mechanical waves in closed pipes (such as a clarinet). This is because this effects derive from the "wavy" ...


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