66

It seems that we don't know, but probably not. What we have here is a notable person claiming without a reference that a peer reviewed journal supposedly reported on what many might consider a miracle. This in itself doesn't prove anything, but you are right to be skeptical. According to the Mary Baker Eddy Library, which is an organization affiliated with ...


12

Obama is not the first sitting US president to publish an academic journal article. In September 1897, William McKinley (25th) published an article in the American Annals of the Deaf. The American Annals of the Deaf is a professional journal dedicated to quality in education and related services for deaf or hard of hearing children and adults. First ...


10

Not in my opinion I would challenge the claim that it is a scholarly article. See this LA Times article for an opposing view: Obviously, JAMA held the president to a different, lower standard than it would an academic scientist. In fact, JAMA editor-in-chief Howard Bauchner admitted as much. In an interview with the Chronicle of Higher Education, he ...


6

This claim is pretty hard to specifically pin down. What is a "scientists studying antimicrobial resistance" exactly? Do we limit the definition to professors who have been exclusively focused on AMR for 10 years or more? Does a grad student who is doing their masters thesis on a topic tangentially related to AMR count? Either way, I cannot do a world census ...


6

No. The linked article in JAMA is a "Special Communications" and most academics would not describe this as a "academic journal article" reserving that distinction for articles falling under the category of "research".


5

It's hard to prove a first, because you have to prove that it has never happened before. However the preponderance of evidence seems to be in favour of it. The evidence comes in two kinds. The repetition of the story by reputable news outlets who normally do a decent job fact checking. For example Fortune magazine, Science, The Independent The almost ...


3

It's OK to cite a figure around 30% if we want to indicate the "effect size". A figure of 75% is only correct to indicate the percentage of population affected by this bias. However care should be taken because there are moderating variables that can easily negate the effect, and thus the effect should not be cited as general rule. Full discussion Asch's ...


2

James Garfield published a short, apparently original, proof of the Pythagorean Theorem in the April 1, 1876 issue (see lower left) of the New-England Journal of Education. He was not elected President until 1880, though, and it’s more a note than a major paper. (Found from here.) The journal itself appears to be a precursor to the Journal of ...


2

Matt Ridley's claim In 2003, the OECD published a paper on ‘sources of growth in OECD countries’ between 1971 and 1998, finding to its explicit surprise that whereas privately funded research and development stimulated economic growth, publicly funded research had no economic impact whatsoever. is completely false. You can read the paper conclusions ...


2

This is from a researcher in the field, and while it doesn't give any hard numbers, it does support the general idea of few US researchers having been involved, at least for quite some time: The Veterans Administration has a wonderful research support system that allowed me to get started and funded me virtually constantly for the 16 years I worked ...


1

A VCU news release has the name of the (yet to be published) paper: “Genetics, the Rearing Environment, and the Intergenerational Transmission of Divorce: A Swedish National Adoption Study,”. The paper might be available through early access, dunno. Also, that web page says "study’s findings are notable because they diverge from the predominant narrative ...


1

It's impossible to prove or disprove the assertion that something is "typical", but there's much evidence that both effects occur (that science and tech benefit each other). There are many examples of science benefiting technology but the quintessetial example could be that a scientist, Sir Tim Barners-Lee invented the web while working on basic science at ...


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