247

Summary The current version of the question asks two things: Have mathematicians concluded that an Indian mathematical physicist has solved the Riemann Hypothesis? No. There isn't a single professional mathematician who publicly stated that they have read Kumar's proof and determined that it is correct. So, has the committee actually come to the ...


177

Euler did write this, but it was not a mistake! Euler's statement was correct under his own definition of the notation that he was using. I looked at the PDF version of Elements of Algebra linked to in SCappella's answer. Reading Section I, Chapter XIII, I found that Euler wrote that most numbers have two square roots, which matches the definition of the ...


92

Almost all studies in this arena are correlative-based and not causation-based, so that I would take them all with a grain of salt. I would all suggest that Weiler and Thomas (2020) omit some important data, such as those that die from the disease from which they could have been vaccinated, and these are important data points. You raise some good points as ...


90

The claim in the article that people who go to the Sci-Hub website are "very vulnerable to having their credentials stolen" is completely baseless, since Sci-Hub never asks for credentials or other personal information. I will instead address the question posed here, about the origin of the credentials obtained by Sci-Hub. The Sci-Hub website does ...


90

It's surprisingly hard to find a reference for this, as it is simply common knowledge among scientists. You don't get paid for publishing a paper in a scientific journal, sometimes you even have to pay yourself, e.g. in many open access journals. I can show the negative, though. In the following graphic from the Nature article "Open access: The true cost of ...


66

It seems that we don't know, but probably not. What we have here is a notable person claiming without a reference that a peer reviewed journal supposedly reported on what many might consider a miracle. This in itself doesn't prove anything, but you are right to be skeptical. According to the Mary Baker Eddy Library, which is an organization affiliated with ...


63

To the best of my knowledge, the paper cited by the BBC is "Vanilloid receptor agonists and antagonists are mitochondrial inhibitors: how vanilloids cause non-vanilloid receptor mediated cell death" (PMID: 17214968 DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.12.179), which lists Timothy E Bates as an author (the last one, which means he was the primary investigator -- h/t Mad ...


63

Following up @DanRomik's full, accurate answer: I was one of the thousands of people asked to study and comment upon the original document. After a brief look, I realized that it was of a fairly typical sort of not-really-mathematical approaches to many things. Numerical stuff, heuristics, etc. I did not read it carefully, but just far enough to be quite ...


43

David Gorski has some (updated) comments about the methodology of the study such as: The authors claim that RIOV “reflects the total number of billed office visits per condition per group, reflecting the total disease burden on the group and the population that it represents,” but no good analysis or references are provided to show that RIOV does, in fact, ...


26

It is worth noting that almost all of the conditions listed in the chart, unless they are unusually severe, do not need professional medical intervention. Skin rashes, coughs, minor to moderate asthma, many eye and ear infections etc. either go away on their own, can be treated with over-the-counter medicine or, if they become chronic, can be manged with ...


26

I see no reason to doubt the statement. Crockford herself says that she is a different kind of polar bear expert than those that study bears in the field indicating that she hasn't conducted original research. In a further blog post, she justifies her relevance as a "polar bear expert" despite not having made scientific contributions in that area:...


25

Euler did argue that √-2 √-3 = √6. Whether this is a mistake depends a lot on context. This appears in Euler's 1770 publication Elements of Algebra in Section I., Chapter XIII. (pdf link). Moreover, as √a multiplied by √b makes √ab, we shall have √6 for the value of √-2 multiplied by √-3; and √4, or 2, for the value of the product of √-1 by √-4. Thus ...


18

Summary: I'd rate the first quote you gave 95% accurate, while the 2nd one only 5% or so, mainly because the bulk of McIntyre and McKitrick (MM henceforth) claims/attacks from their paper(s) turned out to be unfounded, while the small part of their criticism that was factual (and resulted in corrigendum from Mann et al.) turned out inconsequential with ...


14

As formulated: yes. But it's more complicated. Homeopaths did not invent this principle. They interpret it in a peculiar and very far reaching way. First, we should note that 'Hippokrates' is somewhat elusive as a person or 'writer', since the writings we categorize in the corpus hippocraticum are a large collection of texts spanning a timeframe exceeding ...


14

The idea of the apple falling on Newton's head was invented by Isaac Disraeli (father of British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli) in the early 19th century, nearly 150 years after the supposed event. Newton, however, did himself relate the story (toward the end of his life) of his having observed an apple fall, which provided the impetus for his theory of ...


13

Pre-publication peer review is not supposed to catch all errors or mistakes. It's a relatively superficial review (they aren't going to generally perform a rigorous study to validate or invalidate the findings in the pre-publication step) to see if basic, remedial standards of professionalism have been followed before publication. Peer review is not ...


12

"So, has the committee actually come to the conclusion that the Riemann Hypothesis has been solved by Kumar Eswaran?" Yes they did: "On the basis of the assessment, this expert committee has concluded that Dr. Kumar Eswaran’s proof of the Riemann Hypothesis is correct." However this was not an independent committee (it was formed by the ...


12

Does Sci-Hub rely on stolen credentials from unwitting researchers? Yes, at least in part. This is confirmed by Alexandra Elbakyan herself, although she also claims that Sci-Hub isn't the one conducting the phishing attacks: "I bought some credentials from other people," she told Sky News. "Perhaps some credentials (out of thousands used by ...


10

While many agree that the current peer review system is not as effective as people would like it to be, it is not true that there is "no evidence that pre-publication peer review improved papers or detected errors or fraud". Authors overwhelmingly say that peer review improved the quality of their own last published paper. In a 2009 survey of academics [1], ...


10

There was a good article on face masks on SSC way back in March, which reviewed pre-existing evidence on face masks. I think a large reason the issue became contentious is the way that officials treated face masks as unnecessary in the beginning and then changed their minds later. I'm not sure why this happened, but one important issue may be, as described ...


8

Going to try to expand some things from the comments into a full answer. The meta view The paper in question was published in Energy & Environment in 2015. It's since been cited 7 times, mostly by a T Havránek who closely collaborates with the paper's authors. While obviously it's important for Skeptics to consider claims on the object level, on the meta ...


7

As far as the WHO is concerned, they seem to only have changed their recommendation in June (much later than the CDC). Also note that it's a red herring what AAPS says about "respiratory protection" (which they define as excluding "source control") because e.g. the WHO never seems to have claimed that cloth masks act as PPE for the wearer ...


6

Although I cannot find a legitimate source for that 8-point plan, there are a couple of key points in the information you have shared: The citation that you mentioned above is not a professional/valid citation. The bibliography of that book (which should have expanded information) just says: Duke University, Sociological Study, "Peace of Mind" Any ...


5

Yes, and the problem exists across many areas of science The problem of reproducibility is attracting a lot more attention. A recent Nature News Feature discusses the possible causes of bad results in the literature and many examples where they have been exposed. Its headline sums up the problem: Humans are remarkably good at self-deception. But growing ...


4

Other sources only mention the portrait, but answers to this question question whether a portrait of Hooke even existed. As does the Royal Society itself, despite quoting a visitor that mentioned Hooke's portrait. The visitor might have meant the portrait of Theodore Haak: But before we pronounce Newton guilty of destroying Royal Society property, we ...


2

Note: I could only find studies that either (1) correlated some sort of cardiovascular disease or (2) some sort of cardiovascular risk factor with skipping breakfast. Thus, there were articles that state "It is generally accepted that skipping breakfast is associated with higher incidences of cardiovascular disease." but not "Skipping ...


2

A quick glimpse on the article reveals that their study didn't have a control group, that is, children who received a saline shot and were told to be vaccinated. A difference in disease rate between such children and the ones who have truly been vaccinated would indicate an actual effect from the vaccine. That's how COVID vaccines are tested for instance. ...


1

True The CDC changed course on April 3: "The Coronavirus Crisis: CDC Now Recommends Americans Consider Wearing Cloth Face Coverings In Public", npr,org April 3, 20205:49 PM ET On that day April 3 a webpage from the CDC went live called "Recommendation Regarding the Use of Cloth Face Coverings, Especially in Areas of Significant Community-...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible