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142

Normal viruses infect cells in order to take advantage of cellular mechanisms to reproduce themselves. A class of viruses known as "retroviruses" have a slightly peculiar mechanism to achieve this - they synthesise a special enzyme called "reverse transcriptase", which translates their own RNA into DNA which is incorporated into the host cell's genome. The ...


42

I am not sure where these numbers come from and the answer depends on how you encode the genome data and if you define all the redundancy (unnecessary, repetitive data) as "information". First of all, the humane genome contains somewhere around 3.1 (men) to 3.2 (women) billion base pairs. Since the X chromosome is three times longer than the Y chromosome, ...


34

The only genetic difference between men and women is that men have 1 Y chromosome and 1 X chromosome on their sex determinative chromosome. The Human Genome The human (Homo sapiens) genome is stored on 23 chromosome pairs and in the small mitochondrial DNA. Twenty-two of the 23 chromosomes belong to autosomal chromosome pairs, while the remaining ...


32

Data Estimated number of eukaryotic (human) cells in the human body: 1.0×1014 —Wolfram Alpha The haploid human genome (23 chromosomes) is estimated to be about 3.2 billion base pairs long. —Human Genome – Wikipedia The full DNA content of a cell is therefore 6.4 Gbp. Average base pair size: one bp corresponds to approximately 3....


25

We share a large amount of our DNA in common with all mammals through our shared evolutionary past. But I think you have confused two different ideas. Sharing 99% of genes is not the same as sharing 99% of DNA. While we may have nearly the same number and type of genes (i.e. rat genes have counterparts in the human genome) it does not mean that these genes ...


23

This article has already been well-covered on the Internet. dinosaurs.about.com says "a complete hoax, albeit a very entertaining one." Snopes says "False" and explains the image is a kangaroo. Hoax-Slayer says "Hoax" and attributes the origin to "NewsHound, a website that publishes all manner of fanciful nonsense disguised as news reports." That's Nonsense ...


15

It all depends on what you mean by "own". The major issue is that of patents of individual genes, particularly in the United States. A study in 2005 published in Science suggested 20% of human gene DNA sequences were patented and that some genes were patented as many as 20 times. But (in theory at least) each patent is not of the gene itself, but of its ...


12

The short answer: No The long answer: Also No Here is why this does not hold water: Until recently we were not able to extract soft tissues recently as in last 10 years. This is to the best of my knowledge but the first discovery of soft tissue in dinosaurs was about 10 years ago by Mary Schweitzer. Most of the tissue is very old and it would be ...


9

For a simpler answer, you can just look at the size of an ASCI encoded text file containing the human genome's information. This, of course, is not the information content of the genome which, as you can see from the answer above and the comments in this thread, is not that easy to define. In any case, when biologists work on the genome sequence, it tends ...


9

Bone marrow transplants can change a person's blood type because blood cell progenitor cells are transplanted into the recipient. That's pretty much the whole point: to remove cancerous progenitor cells (e.g. via whole body irradiation) or to augment insufficiently active bone marrow (e.g. aplastic anemia) with progenitor cells able to produce blood cells. ...


8

I wish to add to the above answer. Approximately 9% of the genome is viral in origin, but current research suggests there is less of 'you' than there are other viral related sequences. Here is a very nice listing of the percentages of various genetic elements within the human genome: http://sandwalk.blogspot.com/2008/02/theme-genomes-junk-dna.html Although ...


8

NO, it's unsubstantiated. While I can't definitively debunk it, because no experiments were made, or published that debunk this claim, there were also no supporting scientific publications, neither experiments nor theoretical. There is simply no scientific background for this. It's all based on Solfeggio frequencies: [Solfeggio frequencies] referring to ...


7

This isn't exactly a secret. 23&me talk about it on their blog. They seem pretty proud of it. One of the options when you send your sample to them is a box for whether you consent to your data being used in research. https://blog.23andme.com/news/a-note-on-23andmes-new-collaboration-with-gsk/ We have also built a significant research team that ...


5

While I can't find info directly related to the Corvelva site claim, there are numerous articles that criticize the claims made by Dr Theresa Deisher. Such as, via healthfeedback.org Article claiming vaccines cause autoimmunity and autism due to fetal DNA contaminants found unsupported and implausible Three scientists analyzed the article and estimate ...


4

@Sklivvz posted a good back of the envelope theoretical answer, but it is off by a factor of 10 for the following reason: An estimation of the number of cells in the human body Annals of Human Biology (2013) finds that the number of cells in the human body is: 3.72 × 1013 of which 2.63 × 1013 are erythrocytes (red blood cells which do not have DNA) and ...


4

See "Relatedness" article on "The Tech Museum of Innovation" site, part of "Stanford at The Tech Understanding Genetics" where this question is answered by a Geneticist. Here's the pertinent excerpt from the article: So is the bottom line that men and male chimps have more in common than men and women? Of course not. If we take a closer look, we see some ...


4

Yes, DNA sequencing labs monitor sequences ordered for certain "sequences of concern". At least two gene synthesis companies claim to follow the U.S. governmental Screening Framework Guidance for Synthetic Double-stranded DNA Providers, which recommends that providers screen both customers and sequences, and that they ask additional questions if a ...


4

There was a very confusing case in Poland in 2011: Grzegorz G. was suspected of murder of a young woman. There was plenty of non-DNA evidence, but DNA from blood found on crime scene showed 2 different persons (except the victim). It was only after the police determined that the suspect had underwent a bone marrow transplant his DNA samples were more closely ...


3

As noted in the comments, this summary of the experiment comes from several books by David Wilcock, an influential lecturer in the New Age circuit. Wilcock cites a PDF entitled "Crisis in Life Sciences. The Wave Genetics Response," but rather than talking about absorption, this file refers to Garyaev's claim that a quartz filled with DNA will creates a glow ...


2

Ridley is cherry-picking to an enormous extent, such that even if his statements are technically true they are without meaning. Analysis of fibrous materials using X-ray crystallography did indeed contribute to the study of DNA structure, and the techniques may well have been used in the wool industry. However those studies themselves were dependent on ...


2

The book 'Naming Jack the Ripper' was published in 2014 by Russell Edwards, a businessman who bought a silk shawl in 2007 on the understanding that it was the same piece of cloth allegedly found next to Eddowes alleged to be killed by the serial killer Jack the Ripper. Edwards commissioned Dr Louhelainen, a molecular biologist at Liverpool John Moores ...


1

The question assumes that organisms came before viruses. From the latest attempts to deduce what happened many years ago, a current belief is that viruses and organisms had a single originating organism. This means that in terms of the current species, the two likely already were subjects of Endogenosymbiosis, where one didn't necessarily directly come ...


1

Definitely, there is a lot of strong genetic evidence for evolution! The amount of genetic evidence we've been able to collect over even the past few years has increased in an astronomical rate, and we keep on receiving more and more data confirming evolution. Perhaps one of my favourite pieces of evidence is the fusing of chromosome 2 in humans. I'm just ...


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