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115

I assume this is referring to the American Red Cross, because that is where Cracked.com is based. Note also that describing the Red Cross as "a business" is somewhat misleading. It is a foundation. Red Cross do sell blood to hospitals. Yes. All the centers that supply blood for transfusions—whether they're part of the American Red Cross or not—sell ...


11

Your reasoning is faulty. You assume that the capillaries are a single tube of length 60,000 miles. In fact they are many tubes running in parallel, so the flow of blood is divided between parallel capillaries, reducing resistance. Further, empirically if most of the flow of blood was caused by skeletal muscles then (a) the contractions required for this ...


10

The answer seems to be probably yes. Rats were given ethanol to a level consistent with human levels that would cause intoxication [1] Bleeding time and blood loss were increased 1 h after ethanol administration, regardless of the utilized technique. The Framingham Offspring Study looked at platelet function in 1-2k subjects, and found Alcohol ...


10

Yes, this is accurate. The Wikipedia article has a good summary of the science, and you can also read this leaflet from the NHS in the UK. Your question about why this matters so much is a good one, and the answer is really interesting. It turns out that being "AS" (meaning one good gene and one faulty one) makes it very difficult for you to get malaria. So ...


9

Bone marrow transplants can change a person's blood type because blood cell progenitor cells are transplanted into the recipient. That's pretty much the whole point: to remove cancerous progenitor cells (e.g. via whole body irradiation) or to augment insufficiently active bone marrow (e.g. aplastic anemia) with progenitor cells able to produce blood cells. ...


9

Update/Edit The FDA has recently (15 May 2015) released a draft guidance: Revised Recommendations for Reducing the Risk of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission by Blood and Blood Products This does not necessarily mean a new policy will actually be implemented. Public comments need to be considered. The period for public comments ends 15 July 2015 ...


6

According to a study published in 1994 entitled "Serum TSH variability in normal individuals: the influence of time of sample collection" by Scobbo et al., there were significant differences between late-morning non-fasting TSH and early-morning fasting TSH tests: The late morning non-fasting TSH tests declined in 97 of 100 subjects by an average of 26.39%...


5

Probably not. (atleast not boost) The terms used in this claim are like weasel words which from wikipedia is ..for equivocating words and phrases aimed at creating an impression that something specific and meaningful has been said, when in fact only a vague or ambiguous claim, or even a refutation has been communicated. Anyways, coming to the question. A ...


4

There was a very confusing case in Poland in 2011: Grzegorz G. was suspected of murder of a young woman. There was plenty of non-DNA evidence, but DNA from blood found on crime scene showed 2 different persons (except the victim). It was only after the police determined that the suspect had underwent a bone marrow transplant his DNA samples were more closely ...


4

The waiting period absolutely decreases the chance of HIV transmission; HIV can take up to six months to become detectable. Once a person is infected with HIV, it generally takes about 3 months for the body to produce enough antibodies to be detected by an HIV antibody test. (For some people, it can take up to 6 months.) Some HIV tests can detect ...


3

Apparently, yes. The same study seems to be discussed here in a radio format. A predecesor group, from Stanford, saw the same thing (see TED talk here.) At first glance, another separate demonstration of this seems to be described here. The mechanism by which this works is not yet understood, but the effect seems to be real.


2

Lemmy Kilmister is well known for his lifelong large intake of alcohol and this relates to the stated toxic effect of alcohol on his blood in 1980 (Lemmy's blood could be intoxicated by alcohol due to a daily bottle of Jack Daniel's since 1975 until 2013 unless he sobers up). In the documentary 'Live Fast Die Old', it was revealed that Ian Fraser "Lemmy" ...


2

Quoting Megan Scudellari in the Nature Article 'Ageing research: Blood to blood', "For now, any claims that young blood or plasma will extend lifespan are false: the data are just not there. An experiment to test such claims would take upwards of six years — first waiting for the mice to age, then for them to die naturally, then analysing the data." Amy ...


1

There is some merit to these claims, when discussing long term exposure, see - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxygen_toxicity#Eye_toxicity and the references therein, such as http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/xmlui/handle/123456789/2312, some of these effect were noted in hyperbaric chambers.


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