106

Yes. A Washington Post article (and interview with the Baker) includes a picture of the 2013 cake next to the 2017 cake. The Baker of the 2013 cake tweeted this comparison. According to the Post, Tiffany MacIsaac, owner of Washington’s Buttercream Bakeshop, which made the cake said: "the order came in while she was out of town and that the client had ...


29

The claim is false. The soldier does not have evidence of unlicensed software. The claims are based entirely on photographs and witness statements from an anonymous source. There are a number of problems with the claim: The photos show computers which have not been activated. This is not the same thing as unlicensed. The US Army negotiates to license ...


22

Apple acquired the iPad trademark from Fujitsu. Apple now owns the iPad trademark. The trademark (Serial No. 76497338) was filed by Fujitsu in March of 2003 for their iPad wireless handheld computing device used by retailers. Records at the U.S. Patent and Trademark office show that the trademark was assigned to Apple on March 17. Apple licensed the ...


20

The most recent review on this that I know of is File-Sharing and Copyright, a 2009 paper (pdf). The results are unclear: Because the theoretical results are inconclusive, the effect of file sharing on industry profitability is largely an empirical question. We summarize the findings of some of the major studies in table 5. As the list shows, the ...


19

Correlation is a fact, widely known and denied only by IP industry. For example: Those who download illegal copies of music over P2P networks are the biggest consumers of legal music options, according to a new study by the BI Norwegian School of Management. Researchers examined the music downloading habits of more than 1,900 Internet users over the ...


18

From the 1996 PBS television special "Triumph of the Nerds: The Rise of Accidental Empires." [Source] Part 3 - Great Artists Steal: Steve Jobs: "Ultimately it comes down to taste. It comes down to trying to expose yourself to the best things that humans have done and then try to bring those things in to what you're doing. I mean ...


15

It all depends on what you mean by "own". The major issue is that of patents of individual genes, particularly in the United States. A study in 2005 published in Science suggested 20% of human gene DNA sequences were patented and that some genes were patented as many as 20 times. But (in theory at least) each patent is not of the gene itself, but of its ...


14

Issue: Whether Personal computer games are being pirated between 85 to 90%? Evidence: Global Personal software piracy rate is measured at 38% in 2007, 41% in 2008, 43% in 2009 and 42% in 2011 by BSA and IDC Global Software Piracy Study. Piracy rate was higher for consumer software such as PC games and currently it stands at 57%. A hypothetical ...


12

This story is supported by a contemporaneous letter written by Mozart's family in 1770, and the biographical notes written by Mozart's sister a couple of decades after the event in 1792. WikiSource provides* excerpts from two translated documents: And as according to tradition it was forbidden under ban of excommunication to make a copy of it from the ...


12

Firstly, it wasn't until 2011 that YouTube settled the 2007 lawsuit to allow artists and publishers to enter into a licensing agreement with YouTube. This was after the "$12" quote was provided above. As this article explains an artist/publisher has the following three options: keep the song there, take it down or make money off of it. If the third option ...


9

Yes, No, Yes... iPad — apparently LG never bothered to register that as trademark. Fujitsu did have a POS device called iPAD, and it was a point of trademark dispute between them and Apple. Apple settled out of court and paid estimated $4 mln to Fujitsu (source: NYT). This only took care of trademarking in USA, however not elsewhere in the world. For ...


7

The company that makes Spam is called Hormel. I couldn't find any reference to them suing Hotmail, but around 2007 they did sue a company called Spam Arrest that made email filtering software, claiming their trademark was being infringed. They lost. Here is a story from the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. There may have been other such lawsuits as well, but this ...


7

This discussion on Reddit cites a comment by Falkvinge (couldn't find that comment itself) where he gives his source: You're right to ask for sources. One of the primary sources is a book in Swedish on the era of mercantilism on the Continent (meaning Europe). The original article in Swedish is here and there are lots of sources in the comments. ...


4

According to a recent verdict of Bombay High Court, viewing/downloading copyrighted material from the internet is NOT A CRIMINAL OFFENSE. Here is the article related to the verdict in The Times Of India. Justice Gautam Patel said, "The offence is not in viewing, but in making a prejudicial distribution, a public exhibition or letting for sale or hire ...


3

Nate Eldredge's answer is pretty accurate so far; here are more details. The popular email service which was target by Hormel Foods Corp (HRL.N), owner of SPAM (food) is Spam Arrest LLC. Spam Arrest LLC, which is a provider of software and services aimed at stopping email spam, said it won a five-year legal battle against Hormel Foods Corp (HRL.N) to keep ...


3

The RIAA and the IFPI, which is the world wide recording industry association, do not claim a dollar for a dollar losses directly due to piracy. This it what the IFPI claims: Piracy rigs the market 28 per cent of internet users globally access unauthorised services on a monthly basis, according to IFPI. Around half of these are using peer-to-peer ...


3

I don't know if this is related or partially answers your question, but there is a one-off tax on blank cassettes, CDs, mp3 players, mobile phones etc, which goes to the SUISA (the collecting society for Swiss songwriters, composers and music publishers), which if I understand/recall correctly was considered to be a pragmatic way to accommodate all sides. ...


1

The International Confederation of Societies of Authors and Composers (CISAC) can provide the figures for the number of member societies per country and their members. Typically a country will have a 'mechanical rights' and a 'performing rights' society collecting licence fees and distributing royalties. Some countries have joint societies or may be part ...


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