124

No. Non-avian dinosaurs were extinct about 65 million years ago, as the most recent dinosaur bone was directly dated as being 64.8 ± 0.9 Ma old. The second dinosaur bone sample from Paleocene strata just above the Cretaceous-Paleogene interface yielded a Paleocene U-Pb date of 64.8 ± 0.9 Ma, consistent with palynologic, paleomagnetic, and fossil-mammal ...


65

First let me just give you a philosophical overview as to why the question is disingenuous and you are barking up the wrong tree. You ask: Was Richard Leakey correct, did they toss out the fossil, or the theories on early man? No, he was not. Of course, that is because he was taken out of context in that selective quote (a favorite creationist tactic). ...


65

Has tuff found amongst the deposits at the Dinosaur National Monument? Yes. The most famous section of the rocks in Morrison Formation in Dinosaur National Monument, the Brushy Basin Member, is chock full of volcanic ash beds that have long since been converted to rock (1, 2, 3). It's also chock full of dinosaur fossils, which is what makes it so famous. ...


46

No. Scavenger, Predator, or Herbivore? There was some scientific debate about whether the T. rex was a predator or a scavenger, but there is absolutely no debate that it might have been a herbivore. The current state of research is that it was probably both a predator and a scavenger. Here is a paper providing evidence for predatory behavior: Here we ...


40

No they are clearly not very old homo sapiens. The hypothesis of Dr. Cuozzo completely fails to explain the following evidence (and more). Direct DNA evidence Neanderthal DNA has been mapped multiple times and it is distinguishable from Sapiens DNA. While it is clear that Neanderthals and Sapiens share a lot of DNA, it very evident from DNA sequencing that ...


27

According to a Nature article from 1998 this is true (or at least, was in 1998). Coelacanths were known for decades, but only as fossils. They appeared in the fossil record around 370 million years ago, had their heyday in terms of species diversity around 220 million years ago, and went into a long sunset that appeared to end with extinction, around 70 ...


23

tl;dr: Yes, the paper provides strong evidence that we're undergoing a mass extinction event. The media reporting is basically right (for once). What you are asking I'm going to assume that what you're asking amounts to: "Is there any obvious flaw in the methodology of the recent study on this topic, that the (notoriously poor) mainstream science ...


20

No. The alleged human footprints have been extensively analyzed and are most likely dinosaur tracks. There is absolutely no evidence that they are human. Glen J. Kuban has performed a very thorough analysis of the site, and states Some of the these tracks did vaguely resemble human footprints, however, many of the tracks also showed problematic (non-...


20

There is a simple factual response based on the fossil record, "No. Dinosaurs and people did not coexist" but this does not really answer the question "did humans draw dinosaurs?" -- with the implicit assumption that the two coexisted. Here I will provide some commentary about cave drawings (petroglyph, pictogram) with sources for further reading. First a ...


12

The short answer: No The long answer: Also No Here is why this does not hold water: Until recently we were not able to extract soft tissues recently as in last 10 years. This is to the best of my knowledge but the first discovery of soft tissue in dinosaurs was about 10 years ago by Mary Schweitzer. Most of the tissue is very old and it would be ...


8

The original paper1 explains how the prints were dated: Here we report on a footprint surface found in Early Pleistocene estuarine muds at Happisburgh, UK, [...] The estuarine sediments at Happisburgh are part of the Hill House Formation (HHF) and are Early Pleistocene in age, dating to between 1 and 0.78 My. In other words, the footprints were made in ...


7

According to Wikipedia There is dramatic evidence for allosaur attacks on Stegosaurus, including an Allosaurus tail vertebra with a partially healed puncture wound that fits a Stegosaurus tail spike, and a Stegosaurus neck plate with a U-shaped wound that correlates well with an Allosaurus snout.[86] Citation #86 is Carpenter, Kenneth; Sanders, Frank; ...


5

No. The percentage of hominid bones from the human fossil record for 1.0 to 3.8 million years ago is very sparse, since upto 2001 only 243 specimens are known. From about 75 known individuals, some of them are represented by only a single tooth or bone fragment containing identical bone material to be classified as transitional forms from Hominids to Homo ...


5

Larson Kohl's Wikipedia page does state that he found human ancestral remains, but it was Australopithecus afarensis (the same species as the famous Lucy) but nothing about giants. The place described at the passage is Mumba Cave, which is located on the shore Lake Eyasi (not Elyasi) in Tanzania and was excavated by Kohl and his wife margit in the 1930s. ...


4

According to the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History the skull is "Between 350,000 and 150,000 years" old Some further notes on the morphology and dating of the Petralona hominid Journal of Human Evolution vol. 12, December 1983, Pages 731-742, says: somewhat more than 350ky, but certainly less than 730 ky However, A re-analysis of electron spin ...


3

Hominidae Temporal range: Miocene–present, 17 – 0 Mya Dinosaur Temporal range: Late Triassic–Present, 233.23 – 0 Mya all non-avian dinosaurs, estimated to have been 628-1078 species, as well as many groups of birds did suddenly become extinct approximately 66 million years ago. 233.23 – [66] Mya (gap years) 17 – 0 Mya That's 49 million years between the ...


3

Yes. Wikipedia's article Modern birds says, It is generally agreed that the Neornithes evolved in the Cretaceous Period and that the split between the Palaeognathae and Neognathae, and then the split between Galloanserae (fowl) and the other Neognathae, occurred before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event (the earliest fossil remains confidently ...


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