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64

...but China only has 37% of the world's reserves Michael Karnerfors has provided evidence that China produces 95% of the world's rare earth elements. However, China does not hold that much of the world's reserves of such metals. The US Geological Survey mineral commodity summary for 2017 for rare earths gives China's 2016 rare earth's production at 105,...


26

There is plenty of people trying ad hoc experiments about what happens to phones put in a microwave: Cell Phone In A Microwave! video Cell Phone In The Microwave video Is It A Good Idea To Microwave A Cell Phone? video - excludes battery Without peer-review and a proper literature search, there is a limit to how much we can trust these anecdotes. Further, ...


15

It cannot be done safely, or with more than limited success. Your results may vary. First, we need to understand how batteries work. Two chemicals with opposite charges are separated in a cell. When a circuit is completed from the cathode (+) to the anode (-), electromagnetism happens and the two chemicals react with each other, releasing electricity, until ...


14

It depends on the batteries. For alkaline batteries, no. According to Kodak, Ideally cells should be stored in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight, radiators, and other heat sources. Refrigeration is not necessary, nor is it recommended. If you do store batteries in the refrigerator, let them warm up to room temperature (takes about two hours) ...


13

China holds 95% of the world production of Rare-earth Elements When the letter says... The rare metals [...]. More than 85% of the world’s supply comes from China ...I believe the author means Rare-earth Elements/Rare-earth Metals. REMs are necessary elements in the production of electronics, computer chips of all kinds, computer/phone displays, solar ...


13

Many devices when turned off still use a bit of power (e.g. to detect when the on button is pushed when there is no real physical power cutoff) leading them to become dead sooner than when you had removed them when you don't need the device. As vartec mentioned battery leaking can be damaging to the electronics, depending on the design of the battery ...


12

No, lithium scarcity is not a barrier to the take-up of electric vehicles. From Bloomberg: The world’s largest untapped lithium reserve -- containing enough of the lightest metal to make batteries for more than 4.8 billion electric cars ... according to the U.S. Geological Survey.


11

Yes, bouncing batteries tell you if they are charged or not. The claim started with this YouTube video: How To Test a AA battery, Easiest Way For Any Battery Fast, Easy! After it went viral, scientists in the US have been curious, and later they confirmed that a simple bounce test can be used as a technique if a battery is charged. A team led by Daniel ...


10

Based on an CNBC piece with similar claims, the Guardian letter seems to be talking about cobalt: For example, China controls 80 percent of the market in chemical cobalt, a crucial ingredient in lithium-ion batteries, [Benchmark Mineral Intelligence analyst Caspar Rawles] he said. Oddly enough a techcruch piece is somewhat contradictory Approximately ...


10

Interestingly, despite my comment above (which was based on some info I had on early laptop batteries) I have found this article on batteryuniversity.com on Lithium based batteries. I would definitely recommend reading it, and the other information pages there - a lot of good into on the different types: This table compares the number of discharge/charge ...


7

No, that claim is highly inaccurate. I'm guessing that it's somehow related to the part of a talk that was widely quoted (also by mainstream media): Shai Agassi, the founder and former CEO of Better Place, also touted the importance of the rate of battery innovation during his talk at the Cleantech Investor Summit. He said the energy density of ...


6

As you can read in this article, the main metals used in the common design of Li-ion battery are Lithium and Cobalt; lithium is quite abundant, but cobalt is a bit harder to find. It is usually produced as a by-product of nickel mining, and the main source has been the DRC (Congo); there, the use of child "labor" has been getting significant public exposure, ...


4

For a TLDR version, jump to the last paragraph. Since AccuBattery links to another paper than the one they actually cited, I felt like double checking if they represented the paper correctly... and they do. Here's the abstract of Choi and Lim, (who stated their affiliation as Samsung) "Factors that affect cycle-life and possible degradation mechanisms of a ...


4

Yes, it can. This video explains why it works This test works equally well for AA, AAA, C, D and 9 Volt alkaline batteries. It is our understanding that the following chemical reactions occur and helps to explain our observations. A non-rechargeable alkaline battery begins life using zinc powder mixed into a gel containing a potassium ...


3

All sources I found says that the battery is charged when it reaches about V4.0, it does not present memory effects ("memory effect" refers to the phenomenon where the apparent discharge capacity of a battery is reduced when it is repetitivly discharged incompletely and then recharged [7]). The sources also says that this battery's chemistry allows up to ...


2

Some of the answers are referring to "rare earth" elements. There is nothing in the claim or lithium ion batteries related to rare earth elements. Lithium is the only metal ubiquitous to lithium ion batteries. China produced 2000/35,000 or 6% according the 2017 USGS report on lithium. Many lithium ion batteries also contain cobalt. China produced ...


2

Funny, this was just asked the other day on the electronics stackexchange. This was the response from one of the experts there: It is normal for a new Lithium (or any advanced type of rechargeable) batteries to require one or two full charge/discharge cycles. The main reason for this is because there are chips inside that control and monitor the status ...


2

Snopes.com debunks this claim; the analysis even includes the graphic in the question above.


1

Lithium ion batteries are considered as hazardous materials for purposes of airline transportation regulations because they can overheat and ignite in certain conditions and, once ignited, can rapidly spread and be especially difficult to reduce. Research into lithium ion battery fire and explosion shows that the fuel, oxygen and energy existing in lithium ...


1

First post in this group. Generally any lithium battery is rather dangerous. My experience stems from drone flight (lipos mostly), reasonable travel (airplane) and research to keep things safe. Regarding "explode", that is a little hyperbolic. There is not really a "boom", more like a fizz that turns into a fire and possibly a jet of flame. Explosions are ...


1

This paper Bouncing Alkaline Batteries: A Basic Solution confirms the causal link between battery bounce characteristics and state of charge for selected battery chemistries and describes the mechanism imvolved. They say: The coefficient of restitution of alkaline batteries has been shown to increase as a function of depth of discharge. In this work, using ...


1

Storing Li-ion batteries at low temperatures does appear to reduce the rate of capacity loss (page 4, figure 5). They only compared two storage temperatures (5C and 35C), but the batteries stored in the former displayed substantially less loss in capacity.


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