58

According to the Harvard Medical School, the effect on the nutrients in food by a microwave may actually be lower than standard stove-top heating (the microwaves primarily heat up the water in the food, so the other nutrients are more-or-less un-affected). I have copied the discussion they have, with some emphasis to particular things added by me to ...


36

No, there was no such ban. Several sources: http://impiorg.wordpress.com/2012/06/13/did-russia-ban-microwave-ovens-at-some-point-in-the-past/ One such rumor that has been lighting up the internet is the claim that, in the past, Russia had banned microwave ovens. Within IMPI we could not find a source for this assertion, though one of our members, the ...


26

There is plenty of people trying ad hoc experiments about what happens to phones put in a microwave: Cell Phone In A Microwave! video Cell Phone In The Microwave video Is It A Good Idea To Microwave A Cell Phone? video - excludes battery Without peer-review and a proper literature search, there is a limit to how much we can trust these anecdotes. Further, ...


19

There are local hot spots if you don't mix the milk after microwaving. Babies really do get burned by microwaved milk; there is an actual danger the medical community is trying to prevent when giving advice not to microwave milk. The danger is due to a combination of hot spots within the milk and the container being cooler than the milk itself. If ...


13

Not only do they exist, but they make a really easy experiment that can illustrate the speed of light Microwaves ovens really do create hotspots and it is an issue if it matters to have evenly cooked food. That's why many have turntables. But the really cool thing about hotspots is that they can be used in a simple science experiment to get a good ...


10

Yes, they are very real. There is a really great visualization of the microwave hot-spots from a bunch of different microwaves here, using extremely heat-sensitive raw Appalams. As a side, note, EMSL is awesome. They did the experiment, and posted the picures. I just borrowed them (they're CC BY licensed).


8

The origin of this story seems to be a 1958 Reader's Digest article, "Percy Spencer and His Itch to Know", written by Don Murray: One day a dozen years ago [Percy Spencer] was visiting a lab where magnetrons, the power tubes of radar sets, were being tested. Suddenly, he felt a peanut bar start to cook in his pocket. Other scientists had noticed this ...


8

No Microwaved plastics do not cause cancer. Can I microwave food in plastic containers or covered in plastic film? There is no scientific evidence that microwaving food in plastic containers or wrapped in clingfilm can affect the risk of cancer. —Plastic bottles - Cancer Research UK Claim: Research has proved that microwaving foods in plastic ...


6

The only video in that Daily Mail article is of Mark McAllister. According to this article the producers called 911, he went to hospital and was diagnosed with epilepsy. That's corroborated by this page of his employer's web site: In March of 2011, Mark experienced a seizure while reporting live during Global Toronto’s News Hour. He was diagnosed with ...


6

Does microwave radiation have any effects beside heating? Yes. Take a look at this study. Comparisons were drawn between irradiated samples and samples exposed to elevated temperatures within a furnace to extract microwave specific heating effects. The microwave-heating environment was found to exhibit unique effects Is the effect unique to microwaves? ...


5

A few related studies I found: The effect of microwave heating on vitamins B1 and E, and linoleic and linolenic acids, and immunoglobulins in human milk. - says there are no effects on B1/E/acids if resulted average heat is not higher than 60 C Effects of Microwave Radiation on Anti-infective Factors in Human Milk - Microwaving at low temperatures (...


3

It depends on the metal and the microwave. This video shows what happens with a crumpled sheet of aluminium foil: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKQ9vC_DK_c Gold banding on cups is also notorious for causing arcing. However, I was mildly surprised to learn that metal can be placed in a microwave - the USDA says that smooth aluminium foil should be okay (...


2

Snopes.com debunks this claim; the analysis even includes the graphic in the question above.


2

Superheating and microwave ovens There have been many reports of injury to people using microwave ovens to heat water to make hot drinks. Water heated in a microwave oven may be superheated and when objects (e.g. a spoon) or granulated materials (e.g. instant coffee) are put into it, the water may boil very vigorously or even appear to explode out of ...


2

From the question that you quoted, one of the studies quoted there covers some aspects of nutrition. Microwave heating of infant formula: a dilemma resolved Pediatrics (1992) vol. 90 pages 412-415. (Bold emphasis is mine) Microwave heating of infant formula is a common practice despite concerns of infant scalding. Beyond the issue of physical safety, ...


1

Referring to FDA review on reports of serious skin burns or scalding injuries around people's hands and faces as a result of hot water erupting out of a cup after it had been over-heated in a microwave oven. This type of phenomena occurs if water is heated in a clean cup. If foreign materials such as instant coffee or sugar are added before heating, the ...


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