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I've heard people say this before; that eating less shrinks your stomach, making you desire less food in the future. When I looked it up online just now, the first few results conflict:

Eating less shrinks the stomach:

Among the dieters, gastric capacity was reduced 27 percent to 36 percent, on average, depending on how it was measured. There was no significant change in the control group.

Eating less has no effect:

Answer: Myth. Once you are an adult, your stomach pretty much remains the same size -- unless you have surgery to intentionally make it smaller.

Eating less makes your stomach bigger:

Absolutely not!

It’s more lkely to distend your stomach and cause you to gain weight.

So what's the truth? Does it actually cause your stomach to change size? Does it actually reduce your appetite? Is there actually a direct connection between stomach size and appetite?

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    From personal experience, I'd say that it does in fact seem to reduce your appetite after a while, by whatever mechanism (perhaps stomach physical shrinking, or body simply getting used to it and sending fewer signals, etc). I'd like to see some actual research about this topic, however. – Daniel B Nov 21 '12 at 7:35
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    Another anecdote: I was in the hospital a couple of years ago and did not eat solid food for two months. (I was "fed" through an IV.) Once I had recovered enough to eat again, my stomach capacity was very low - I remember having two scrambled eggs for breakfast (and nothing else, hadn't eaten for 8-10 hours) and I couldn't finish them. Obviously I can't say for sure whether my stomach was physically smaller than before or if my body decided to give me the "you're full, stop eating" signal far earlier. – Graeme Perrow Nov 21 '12 at 18:15
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    I note that the third link is talking about eating less for one day, which seems unlikely to be sufficient to trigger significant changes in organ size. – Oddthinking Nov 22 '12 at 13:23
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    Not an answer, but interesting: This study compared bulimics to obese people and it suggests gastric capacity is related to how much you binge, rather than body weight. – Oddthinking Nov 22 '12 at 13:25
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    Regarding appetite, the mechanism for that as it relates to the stomach (when the stomach is physically stretched, it triggers the body to stop producing the hormone that communicates hunger) is touched upon here: skeptics.stackexchange.com/questions/35330/… – PoloHoleSet Jun 29 '17 at 16:10
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From WebMD:

  1. Myth or Fact: If you cut down on your food intake, you'll eventually shrink your stomach so you won't be as hungry.

Answer: Myth. Once you are an adult, your stomach pretty much remains the same size -- unless you have surgery to intentionally make it smaller. Eating less won't shrink your stomach, says [Mark Moyad, MD, director of preventive and alternative medicine at the University of Michigan Medical Center in Ann Arbor], but it can help to reset your "appetite thermostat" so you won't feel as hungry, and it may be easier to stick with your eating plan.

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    Welcome to Skeptics, Robert! Be sure to quote your sources. Plagiarism isn't acceptable. – Oddthinking Jun 29 '17 at 17:08
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    This is part of the quotes in the question. – T. Sar Jun 30 '17 at 11:33
  • @Oddthinking thank you! Should I delete my answer or edit it somehow? – Robert Welain Aug 31 '17 at 10:18
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    Re: Plagiarism - it was fixed by endolith, so just be careful next time. Re: T. Sar's comment -it doesn't add anything to the question, so I would delete it. – Oddthinking Aug 31 '17 at 10:58
  • @Oddthinking ah, ok. I wanted to put a link, but I was afraid it will be considered as spam – Robert Welain Aug 31 '17 at 14:21
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The New York Times - "The Claim: Your Stomach Shrinks When You Eat Less"

Among the dieters, gastric capacity was reduced 27 percent to 36 percent, on average, depending on how it was measured. There was no significant change in the control group.

Honestly, I don't think anyone really knows. One thing is known. People sure do like to give their opinion as fact one way or the other.

I can tell you that when I eat less, the longer i have reduced my caloric intake, the less I can even manage to eat when i really would like to eat more. After reading the article at the link I posted, I would lean to say yes, your stomach does contract a bit.

This makes sense since most would agree it gets larger when you eat a lot- as in competitive eating. Logic would also deduce that since everything else shrinks when you cut calories, your stomach would too :)

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    "People sure do like to give their opinion as fact one way or the other." I agree with that. Unfortunately this answer doesn't say anything I didn't already say in the question. – endolith Apr 18 '17 at 13:47
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    Answer is ironically meta. – Ben Barden Jun 29 '17 at 15:39

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