86

There are many reasons why this is wrong. The first one is the assumption of 1 supernova per 25 years. That was the value arrived at in Gustav Tammann's article published in 1970. Others got values up to 100 years (Tammann himself changed his value later). All these values are really only good guesses. Worse errors are made in the percentage of remnants ...


14

The following lists just some of the evidence for dark matter. Dark matter was first proposed by Fritz Zwicky in 1933, when he discovered that galaxy clusters do not have enough visible mass to hold them together. The galaxies move so fast that, if there were no invisible matter, they would leave the cluster and we would not be able to observe any such ...


11

The quote in the OP from the creation article is an accurate summary of a mainstream Science Daily article: Big Bang's Afterglow Fails Intergalactic 'Shadow' Test: If the standard Big Bang theory of the universe is accurate and the background microwave radiation came to Earth from the furthest edges of the universe, then massive X-ray emitting clusters of ...


7

Dark matter is hypothetical -- no one knows if it actually exists or what it is. What has been seen are various gravitational effects on matter, such as stars, or energy, such as cosmic microwave background. It is not claimed that it is undetectable, but directly undetected. This is so because little is known beyond its gravitational interaction, but the ...


5

The Big Bang was the whole universe. There was no "centre" to the Big Bang; the (hypothetical) point source was all of the universe. There was no space expanding from that point, space itself was expanding. Hence light from the BB was everywhere in the whole universe. If you were there it would be like living in the middle of a massive fireball - so there ...


2

"Dark matter", in the sense of unobserved matter causing gravitational effects, was first considered in the 1922 article First Attempt at a Theory of the Arrangement and Motion of the Sidereal System Astrophysical Journal, vol. 55, pages 302-328, by Jacobus Kapteyn. Kapteyn does discuss kinetic gas theory in this article, but in the sense that each ...


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