Hot answers tagged

47

This is true, but misleading Temperatures over 50 were routinely measured in Australia in the 19th century, but it was due to the fact that Australia hadn't modernized its weather technology until 1910, which is when "official" Australian heat records begin. The pre-1910 data have not been “wiped from the record”. They are still available on the Bureau’s ...


40

It's not just your culture. Advice from the US National Weather Service includes: Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches. The answer to this related question (including the transcript of interview with meteorologist John Jensenius) and this advice from National Geographic gives some reasons for the advice. Metal frame windows and doors ...


39

Yes. As published in "Do Fish Fall from the Sky?" Science vol. 109 page 402, On October 23, 1947, biologist Alexander Dimitrivitch Bajkov, PhD was eating breakfast with his wife at a restaurant in Marksville, Louisiana when the waitress told them that fish were falling from the sky. ...J. E. Gremillion, and two merchants, E. A. Blanchard and J. M. ...


18

The main harm from ingestion of alcohol in cold weather is the risk of hypothermia. Alcohol is known to affect body temperature during cold weather as well as hot weather. Drinking alcohol may decrease one's core body temperature regardless of the outside temperature and might increase hypothermia risk. Alcohol ingestion increases the risk of acquiring ...


17

I immediately thought soot from the yellow flames and dry snow. It is people, many of whom are unfamiliar with snow, misunderstanding what is happening. There is a good description from Chris West at Metabunk where he sets out three points: The snow is melting, but the very loose fluffy structure of the snow wicks away the water, turing dry snow into wet ...


14

While Tesla was reportably able to reproduce this in a laboratory setting well before any other scientists could, we have been able to produce it since then. A press release from the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik which is repeated by PHYS ORG show it.


14

To some extent yes. Well know technique is cloud seeding to induce rain. It was used during the Vietnam War, operation Popeye was carried out to induce heavy rains over Ho Chi Ming Trail. "Few aviation writers and historians seem to be aware that there were three WC-130As. These three were originally trash-haulers, borrowed from TAC in late 1966 ...


14

Apparently, "yes", according to Weekly cycles of air pollutants, precipitation and tropical cyclones in the coastal NW Atlantic region. R.S. Cerveny and R.C. Balling, Jr. Nature, 394: 561-562. 1998 (www) Abstract: Direct human influences on climate have been detected at local scales, such as urban temperature increases and precipitation enhancement1, ...


13

Ignoring records, what are the peak speeds that are often recorded? If this Mount Washington Monthly Statistics report is accurate (and, unfortunately, they don't seem to have a permanent link to individual montly stats), February 2012 saw: Average for the Month: 47.2mph Departure from Normal: 4.2mph Peak Gust: 118.0 from the W (13) Days ...


13

Chris Landsea, Science and Operations Officer at NOAA’s National Hurricane Center, writes: During each hurricane season, there always appear suggestions that one should simply use nuclear weapons to try and destroy the storms. Apart from the fact that this might not even alter the storm, this approach neglects the problem that the released ...


13

It is entirely normal and natural for clouds to form around the contrails of aircraft. The clouds in the video are mostly cirrus. Cirrus clouds are very high clouds of ice crystals, and form in particular conditions - when there is a lot of moisture high in the atmosphere, and there are sufficient nucleation sites - that is, particles of dust or ice for the ...


12

The conditions required for contrail persistence are ice-supersaturation. This means that the air is cold and humid enough that the water vapor will directly "condense" out of the air in the form of ice (the process is called "deposition"). Ice supersaturation is around 60-70% of the normally reported relative humidity, which applies to water1. However, and ...


11

Jobst Brandt, author of "The Bicycle Wheel" (which explains how to build strong bike wheels and which includes a finite-element analysis of spoked wheels) lays out the argument at Sheldon Brown's site: Commercial aircraft, and especially motorcycles, demonstrate that a round cross section tire, like the bicycle tire, has an ideal shape to prevent ...


11

No, the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale currently tops-out at Category 5. Snopes has also covered this issue: Is Irma a Category 6 storm? We can say with certainty that Hurricane Irma is not a Category 6 storm and will not become one because that category does not exist. The highest rating on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale is a five, ...


10

Let me pose another process by which the anecdotal "scorching" might occur when watering during sunlight hours that sounds plausible: Let's say the water has a significant amount of some compound (e.g. salt or some other chloride) dissolved in it and some of the water sits on the leaf under the blazing sun so evaporates in place on the leaf it leaving ...


10

Blogger Randal Olson reproduced a chart from Nate Silver's The Signal and the Noise which in turn has based on data from ForecastWatch. Ignore the orange line; it is irrelevant for this discussion. (Just for illustration: It is based on a similar idea of predicting that it will be hot on your birthday, because it has been hot on your previous birthdays.)...


10

An F2 tornado can flip and tumble lighter cars, which might be less comfortable than lying flat in a ditch where the wind can't get under you. Certainly in this case: Better options than ditches, overpasses, and cars (all terrible), are storm shelters and flood-proof cellars.


10

About 100 a year in the USA. An estimated 195 100 individuals (95% confidence interval, 140 400-249 800) were treated in US EDs for snow shovel–related incidents during the 17-year study period, averaging 11 500 individuals annually (SD, 5300). The average annual rate of snow shovel–related injuries and medical emergencies was 4.15 per 100 000 population. ...


10

The Facebook post cites Cody Pierce as the source for the photo. In a comment on that post (does that link to the comment? it should) he states: Marg Braddock Real or photo chopped? Either way it is an impressive picture! 17 · January 10 at 6:48pm · Edited Cody Pierce It's real just holding him self up 24 · January 9 at 4:09pm So the photo ...


9

THE GREAT WIND OF APRIL 11-12, 1934, ON MOUNT WASHINGTON, N.H., AND ITS MEASUREMENT In the course of preparation of this paper, and in order to establish all the facts of such important records, arrangements were made with the cooperation of the Chief of the Weather Bureau and the Director of the Bureau of Standards to subject the anemometer to ...


9

Yes, you can: Before the rain begins, one of the first odors you may notice as winds pick up and clouds roll in is a sweet, pungent zing in your nostrils. That's the sharp, fresh aroma of ozone—a form of oxygen whose name comes from the Greek word ozein (to smell). Tropospheric chemist Louisa Emmons at the National Center for Atmospheric Research ...


9

Scientists at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, part of the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have determined that it's too early to tell. Through research, GFDL scientists have concluded that it is premature to attribute past changes in hurricane activity to greenhouse warming, although simulated hurricanes tend to be ...


9

I don't believe "longitudinal wave interferometry" is actually a thing. Therefore, I think it's safe to say that any related weapons do not actually exist, and even implying that said weapons are "just theoretical" would be giving the whole notion too much legitimacy. Google Scholar returns only one result for "longitudinal wave interferometry", which is a ...


7

From AT&T Southeast FAQ - http://www.dslreports.com/faq/1331 Can weather affect my DSL connection? Answer: Yes, it can. The primary cause of poor connections due to weather are moisture related. Since ADSL technology is electrical in nature, all of the exposed equipment can be affected by moisture which is an excellent conductor of ...


7

It's not really about ADSL, which is the technology responsible for connection from the switchbox to your home ("the last mile"), but more about the broadband relay links. These can be either wired (typically in densely populated areas) or wireless using microwave transmission relays (more typical in less populated areas). Water particles, such as rain ...


7

There are mixed claims in the question, "lack of sunshine" does not mean "above average rainfall" nor "more rainy days". It means more days with significant cloud coverage (some of which may be rainy). As you can see on below map, insolation (average sunshine energy received) of UK is significantly lower than rest of Europe. There are two factors ...


7

There was a joint Hungarian-German study on the subject led by Dr. Gábor Horváth at Eötvös University in Budapest, Hungary. A team of physicists, troubled by the lack of scientific evidence for the phenomenon, set out to test the theory that water droplets on leaves can act like mini magnifying lenses, focusing the sun's rays and leaving a leaf's surface ...


7

Can they form near the the equator? Yes. Cyclone Agni from 2004 is probably the best example of this: according to the India Meteorological Department, it was 1.5 degrees north of the equator when it became a tropical cyclone, and before it reached that strength, the circulation center may have crossed the equator twice. Is it normal? No. There are any ...


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