New answers tagged

4

The New York Times obituary is incorrect. The law was passed in 1978. I found the law in a 1986 publication of New York City laws (link). That in itself isn't helpful. However, I also noticed the publication had an annotation immediately after each law that included when that particular law was added. Searching for the next law in the sequence (to get around ...


5

The testimony is available from archives.gov, apparently released in October 2017; it matches the testimony given in the claim. In it, James Wilcott testifies that, while working at the CIA, he heard rumours from several colleagues that Oswald worked for the CIA, he was told the cryptonym (code name) purportedly of Oswald, but he didn't see any evidence to ...


14

Links from NBC News and HuffPost describing the outcome of the trial of Mateen's wife indeed suggest not, or at least that there was no evidence that the attack was targeted. HuffPost: As far as investigators could tell, Mateen had never been to Pulse before, whether as a patron or to case the nightclub. Even prosecutors acknowledged in their closing ...


10

In the early 2000s, Princeton changed their grading policies with the explicit goal of trying to curb grade inflation. The policy was eventually rolled back after complaints from students that the new policy was unfairly affecting their grad school chances. It's not like Princeton's policy change wasn't well known among other schools. After an undergrad ...


31

The title asks a broader question, while the body seems to focus on something more specific. Since CJR's answer seems to have addressed the more specific question, I'll try to address the broader one. Yes, this is extremely well documented, and the trend has not been at all subtle. A good book on the topic is Grade Inflation: A Crisis in College Education, ...


48

Well I tracked down the origin of the claim: http://www.gradeinflation.com/ Specifically from [1]: The authors hypothesize the following to explain these results: On a national basis, the evolution of grading practices seems to be the result of a gradual abandonment of curve-based grading (Figure 2). Grading practices for private and public schools, which ...


-1

This 2015 Gizmodo article sheds some light on the situation. In fact, experts estimate that over 52,000 British prisoners were shipped off to colonial America.


3

At first glance it looks like a Turning Point meme. Some examples are of Ben Shapiro and Jordan Peterson. This meme format is quite popular "on the left", and is used to mock or poke fun at conservative viewpoints. It's quite difficult to explain without bias, however, there is a subreddit that shows these photoshops aren't just a one-off thing. As ...


31

The meme is unclear It is not clear whether the meme is talking about absolute numbers or per capita murder rates. I'll talk about both. The meme does not distinguish murder vs homicide The first thing to note is that murder is a legal term, not equivalent to homicide. Murder does not include accidents or various manslaughter that led to homicide without ...


78

This is not possible based on the information given. The link you provided has the US at 6th with 16,214 murders and 189th place is a 3 way tie with 9 murders each. Using this data that would require that those 6 cities accounted for all but 9 murders in the country. If you look at the overall stats for the country you will find this is impossible. https://...


148

This is false no matter what way you try to frame it. Using the 2019 crime stats: Murders US: 15020 [1] Chicago: 491 [2] Detroit: 273 [3] New Orleans: 120 [4] St. Louis: 194 [5] Washington DC: 166 [6] These cities have a combined census population of 4.67m (out of 308.75m for the USA), which is ~1.5% of the total US population [7] Removing those 5 cities ...


6

SurveyMonkey describes how they select participants: SurveyMonkey Contribute panelists take surveys for charity and a chance to win a sweepstakes prize. Rewards panelists earn credits for completing surveys which they can redeem for gift cards or donate to charity. All panelists share demographic info about themselves like gender, age, and region, and other ...


5

Surprisingly, the answer is yes; there's a an official written request; item #2 on the list is the "apparent disappearance Huang Yanling, a scientist / technician who worked in the WIV lab but whose lab web presence has been deleted". And #4 is indeed about roadblocks and cell phone traffic. Specifically, to address the NIH’s concerns, EcoHealth ...


32

The article in question seems to be "Research on Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Influenza Virus: The Way Forward". The abstract is: The voluntary moratorium on gain-of-function research related to the transmissibility of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus should continue, pending the resolution of critical policy questions concerning the rationale for ...


18

The Washington Post has the article A flu virus risk worth taking by Anthony S. Fauci, Gary J. Nabel and Francis S. Collins (December 30, 2011). It seems unlikely that this is the "paper from 2012" that they were referring to but nonetheless it seems especially relevant as an easier to read article expressing Fauci's opinions on the subject: [I]...


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