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128

Yes. It appears to be a picture of the MV Blue Marlin - in fact it is written on the middle of the stern of the ship. Blue Marlin is a semi-submersible heavy lift ship from Dockwise Shipping of the Netherlands. Designed to transport very large semi-submersible drilling rigs above the transport ship's deck, [...] With this information, it is not hard to ...


90

Proving a negative is always hard, but Patrick Vlaskovits wrote a post for Harvard Business Review titled Henry Ford, Innovation, and That “Faster Horse” Quote in which he says No. My methodology consisted of searching the Google Books corpus, which shows that the quote doesn’t appear until: 2002 in “Beyond Disruption: Changing the Rules in the ...


55

The claim about hours seem to be accurate, the claim about salaries not so much. Summary: The source data are for UK train drivers, not London tube drivers. The doctors part of the source data does not include that London salaries are generally higher than average, which we should include when comparing to London tube drivers. The chart mislabels doctor's ...


42

The Sun piece is likely to be lifted form The Financial Times article written by Susanne Sternthal1 on January 16th, 2010. The FT article is well researched and, we assume, fact checked, citing Andrei Poyarkov (note the different transliteration) and Andrei Neuronov as primary sources. Both are published writers, and Poyarkov a respected scientist. Sternthal ...


20

Yes. In fact, some sources calculate that the FAO figure is actually an underestimate. A frequently cited study on the topic is Steinfeld et al. (2006). This is the FAO study already mention in the question. It has 1503 citations on Google Scholar, although only 40 in the more conservative Scopus. I am not sure if it is peer-reviewed. To judge its ...


20

The association of this saying with Henry Ford originated with a 1999 article in The Cruise Industry News Quarterly where it was stated: John McNeece: "There is a problem trying to figure out what people want by canvassing them. I mean, if Henry Ford canvassed people on whether or not he should build a motor car, they'd probably tell him what they really ...


19

No, that was Alex Sheshunoff alluding to the song Faster Horses by Tom T. Hall. He was an old time cowboy, don't you understand His eyes were sharp as razor blades, his face was leather tanned His toes were pointed inward from a hangin' on a horse He was an old philosopher of course He was so thin I swear you could have used him for a whip He ...


19

Absence in registry of ships There are no records of an SS Ourang Medan in Lloyds Register for 1946. You can find records of other ships with similar names - for example the SS OrangOutan! Some of the stories about the SS Ourang Medan mention that an American ship named Silver Star heard the morse-code distress call and responded. Sometimes the Silver Star ...


14

Is it (still) true? Old question, just wanted to point out that at the very least Swiss trains are not exceptional by a European standard. The punctuality grade cited by Thursagen does not include either a year, nor a qualifier (e.g. 3 minute mark, 5 minute mark or even more). Now, for Switzerland one can find for last year, 2013, the punctuality was 87.5% ...


14

Tl;dr version: The school policy change notice did emphasize that For safety reasons, parents will no longer be allowed to walk to the front of the school to retrieve students on foot. This will ensure all of our students get home safely. Only one written trespassing warning is confirmed and the school says it was given to prevent harassment and physical ...


13

tl;dr- Yes, this type of aircraft carrier can and does go for decades before refueling, able to circle the globe many times over that period. While not literally "unlimited", it's a decently close approximation for Wikipedia to show in a quick-facts table. This aircraft carrier first refueled 25 years after being launched According to the US Navy's ...


12

The short answer is probably not. See this article for a short description of how these things are done. For coins, the machine measures diameter, thickness and number of ridges (on part of the circumference - not the whole edge) so you may think that grinding the coins would affect this. However, because coins are treated pretty harshly - banging ...


10

Using nuclear power to power the vessel, it's able to carry a fuel load many times beyond the longest possible missions and ranges. So, while not actually "unlimited," there isn't a plausible scenario where they'd run short. As mentioned in Nat's answer, the fuel core for Nimitz-class aircraft carriers is estimated to be at least 20 years. No mission ...


9

I cannot find any current data, but back in 2011-2012 when Japan was considering fully privatizing its metro systems, reports were that they were profitable. July, 2011: Tokyo Metro, which carries more than 6 million passengers each day over a 195 kilometre network of tracks, posted a 36.8 billion yen net profit for the financial year ended March 2011 on ...


8

1. Caveat This is going to be an unsatisfactory answer, for the following reasons: Boardman's claim is ambiguous: how are we to interpret the you in "you are statistically more likely to have a head injury walking"? A statistically average person in the country, considered over some period of time such as a year? Someone considering making a particular ...


7

Almost certainly not. Google and Tineye reverse image searches both trace back to this image on Flickr, which describes it as a "Padda" armored patrol vehicle used by the South African railways. Google image searching on variations of "padda armored vehicle" bring up similar-looking images such as this one. Perhaps there's mass confusion between a jerry-...


5

I'm just adding one more source to the mix: http://www.delijn.be/over/milieu/co2_uitstoot_verkeer.htm It is in dutch, but some highlights: avg traffic: 118 g/km bus (14 persons): 85 g/km tram (23 persons): 23 g/km (nuclear power) train :28g/km But do these numbers mean that adding new trams and trains will lower CO2 usage? Not necessarily: new lines ...


5

No. It's not even the most profitable. The MTR in Hong Kong is one of the most profitable metro systems in the world; it had a farebox recovery ratio of 187% in 2015, the world's highest (source).


3

Does the aircraft carrier have unlimited distance range? Not really true, no. While the ship does have sufficient power, the crew will starve at some point, so it still needs to resupply after a couple of months. The storage capacity of Nimitz Class carriers for refrigerated and dry food can support a crew of 6000 for Aproximatly 70 days. But, ...


2

The data is different just for the US: The primary sources of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States are: Transportation (28.9 percent of 2017 greenhouse gas emissions) – The transportation sector generates the largest share of greenhouse gas emissions. Greenhouse gas emissions from transportation primarily come from burning fossil ...


2

The claim that installation of blue streetlights in Japan caused a reduction in suicide rates is unproven by research since experts say there’s no conclusive evidence that blue lights will prevent suicide and the effectiveness of the blue lights in this regard has not yet been proven. The limitation for the study in 2013 showing decrease in suicides is that ...


2

TL;DR yes, decisions to fly do contribute to GHG emissions from regulated sources within the EU, and decisions to not fly contribute to GHG reductions. The paper is based on a set of assumptions. The paper is internally consistent - that is to say, if the assumptions hold, the conclusions hold. If they do not, there is no basis to accept the conclusion, ...


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