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38

There are many exchanges and many different kinds of commodities. Most, but not all commodities require that the physical delivery be made to one of the designated warehouses or depositories. For example, CME document "Precious Metals Delivery Physical Delivery Process - CME Group", page 11, says: Clearing firms play a central role in the ...


37

Part 121 The United States Munitions List Enumeration of Articles Sec. 121.1 General. The United States Munitions List. ... Category XIII--Auxiliary Military Equipment ... (b) Information Security Systems and equipment, cryptographic devices, software, and components specifically designed or modified therefore, including: (1) ...


26

Probably not in recent times, and almost certainly not perishable goods (pork bellies etc.) There's a pretty long thread on money SE, from which I'll just extract this bit on CME [Chicago Mercantile Exchange] rules: For some commodities you can't get physical delivery (for instance, Cheese futures won't deliver piles of cheese to your door, for reasons ...


19

Actually, it looks like books with crypto algorithms were excluded from such exporting licensing requirements; in the Karn case: The ODTC [Office of Defense Trade Controls] determined that the book, which contained the algorithms in printed form, was not subject to its export jurisdiction because it was in the public domain. However, the information ...


16

The Soviet government really did trade 17 submarines and three warships for a supply of Pepsi. However, I can't find a source regarding how much Pepsi they received in exchange. The reason for this unusual trade was that Soviet roubles were worthless outside of the USSR, so PepsiCo couldn't receive any money in exchange for their product, and instead settled ...


13

Have a look at the case Bernstein v. United States In the early 1990s, Daniel J. Bernstein created the Snuffle encryption system. He wanted to publish it in an international conference. However, after asking the appropriate US department, he was told by the Office of Defense Trade Controls: the information known as Snuffle 5.0 has been determined, under ...


12

Well, the percentage is most likely lower, but it's hard to say (by) how much exactly. For 2016, the global trade figure in goods/merchandise is $15.46 trillion, while the intra-EU trade is €3.1 trillion. Assuming 1:1 exchange parity that makes intra-EU trade about 20% of world total. Even assuming the rest of the world is just WTO (obviously it's not, you'...


11

The proportion of all businesses involved in UK trade with the EU is not particularly meaningful as most UK businesses are extremely small and do not themselves trade internationally, even if they are part of supply chains which do. An example might be a Bulgarian builder (theoretically treated as a sub-contractor for tax reasons) resident in the UK who ...


9

The more I look into this question, the more reasons I find to think it is unlikely. I cannot find any evidence that any futures contract has ever obligated the buyer to take physical ownership of the product on their own premises. Here is a summary of how "delivery" on futures contracts actually works. When delivery takes place, a warrant or bearer ...


6

In 1989 Japan granted Texas Instruments a patent for the first semiconductor integrated circuit according this New York Times article: https://www.nytimes.com/1989/11/24/business/japan-grip-still-seen-on-patents.html Texas Instruments said late Tuesday that the Japanese Patent Office had awarded it a patent for its basic integrated circuit. The company ...


5

I managed to find one of Sander's position statements on this (but not Warren's so I'll accept an answer on that): Donald Trump’s haphazard and reckless plan to impose tariffs on Canada and the European Union is an absolute disaster that will cause unnecessary economic pain to farmers, manufacturers and consumers in Vermont and throughout the country. I ...


4

The article cites to reference 13, which is a CCP source. The source says (in part): 海关统计显示,前2个月,铁矿砂、原油、煤和天然气等大宗商品进口量分别增加1.5%、5.2%、33.1%和2.8%。同期农产品进口值增长6.8%,其中大豆进口量增加14.2%,猪肉进口量增加1.6倍,有力保障了春节前后市场供应和重点民生商品价格的稳定。此外,全国海关全力做好防疫物资快速通关工作,实现防疫物资通关特办、速办、即办,1月24日-2月29日,全国海关共验放疫情防控物资24.6亿件,价值82.1亿元。其中防护用品共24亿件,主要包括口罩20.2亿只,防护服2538万件。 which, according to google ...


3

It is unlikely to have the claimed impact for two reasons that are largely ignored. Tariffs are just a tax that gets added on certain goods that come into the country causing consumers to pay more for the goods. This is both from the tariff being passed on to consumers and goods that are not under the tariff can charge more and still be cheaper. Investing ...


2

Probably Not. (This is a snippet from my longer answer to Was the Pepsico company command the 6th biggest military in the world for a brief time? which was closed. It wasn't.) What's clear is the Soviets offered to sell old navy ships to Pepsi. But there's little evidence that the deal went through before the Soviet Union collapsed. Searching for the source ...


2

It looks like CNBC the analysis is correct as far as the parts accounting is concerned just from the general definition of "trade in value added" -- TiVA as accounting for precisely this components issue not accounted for in the usual/gross trade balance. On the other hand, the same WTO book gives us a reason why we don't hear more often about this TiVA ...


1

Not exactly the same but IGM, an expert panel for measuring economists' views on various issues, asked its participants to rate "A typical country can increase its citizens’ welfare by enacting policies that would increase its trade surplus (or decrease its trade deficit)" and they were heavily against.


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