118

The answer is that spiders definitely can hurt you. While you may not be likely to be killed, spiders can absolutely hurt you, whether from a large one's bite (whether venomous or not) or from any venomous spider. Australia is probably the best case here, and while they have only had one death from spider bite in 40 years (from a redback bite) this is ...


66

In the absence of any further information, it seems likely that these lambs have recently been given some vaccines or other drugs. As a result, they will not be fit for human consumption until the levels of those drugs have fallen to within acceptable levels. See the section headed "Withdrawal periods for drugs" in Sheep Medicines (UK source) ...


63

No. The amount of formaldehyde in 200 grams of pear is about 7 times the maximum that an infant would receive from a single vaccine, as explained below: According to Determination of formaldehyde in foods, biological media and technological materials by headspace gas chromatography Chromatographia December 1996, Volume 43, pages 625-627: Sample: Pears ...


61

No, this is not true. Not even for just India, as Indian cobra (Naja naja) has round pupils and subcaudal (tail) scales are divided. There is also no pit visible. It is venomous species of snake. This answer assumes, that author means venomous snakes instead of poisonous, as this is common mistake. Also, Wikipedia should have enough credibility for this ...


38

No, the maths on these memes don't quite add up, but it is fair to say that a pear does still contain quite a bit more formaldehyde than any vaccine by at least a factor of 10. According to the WHO (World Health Organization), (PDF File) a Pear can contain 6 to 38.7 mg/kg of formaldehyde. That would mean for a 200 gram pear, we have anywhere from 1.2 to 7....


36

In this answer, I do not prove that eating a pack of cigarettes is safe. (Please don't do it!) However, I show that there is a common belief that a pack of cigarettes would contain enough nicotine to kill an adult is based on a urban legend. (That doesn't mean it is wrong, just that it hasn't been proven right.) This is based on this article: Bernd Mayer, ...


30

Let me start off with my conclusion as a chemist... I absolutely don't believe that heating honey in hot water would make the liquid indigestible or toxic. The claim The webpages cited by the OP, and many others, claim that heating honey in water makes it "unsafe" (I'm lumping indigestible and toxic into one category). Without any reference to some ...


30

Are spiders unable to hurt people? There are several species of spiders, some large, others not so large. that are quite capable of harming people. Some can cause severe injury to or kill people. Three requirements: The fangs need to be large enough to puncture the epidermis. The human epidermis is thick enough to render what otherwise would be harmful ...


30

The claim First let's start with noting that the goal of the episode was to get children over their irrational fear of spiders and making those children see the bigger picture. Mummy says cobwebs mean spiders and she hates spiders but Daddy Pig doesn't because spiders eat flies and flies are horrid. Source: Synopsis of episode https://peppapig....


27

As well as personal experience from eating onions that were cut not on the same day. From the National Onion Association: Leftover Onion and Cut Onion Q: Are cut onions or leftover onions poisonous? A: When handled properly, cut onions are not poisonous. After being cut, onions can be stored in the refrigerator in a sealed container for up to 7 days. A ...


26

... maybe a bit more education hurts even less... but the answer is still no. So to me the description with pits and slit pupils (and also the head drawing) looks like indicating pit vipers. I don't knot about their tail scales, though (and it doesn't seem very practial to me to check...). Pit vipers are venomous. But there are lots of venomous snakes ...


23

That is a diagram for identifying pit vipers. There are many, many venomous snakes in the world, including I believe all of the most deadly ones, that are not pit vipers. The advice is particularly unfortunate for Australia, as not a single one of Australia's 10 most dangerous snakes are pit vipers. All 10 are instead elapids. The origin of this graphic is ...


21

No, in general young lamb isn't poisonous. Lambs are sometimes slaughtered very young, earlier than six weeks of age. If young lamb in general was dangerous than that meat wouldn't be fit for consumption. The Official Journal of the International Goat Association published a paper Effects of age and season of slaughter on meat production of light lambs: ...


18

According to Nicotine Content of Domestic Cigarettes, Imported Cigarettes and Pipe Tobacco in Iran Addiction & Health 2012, volume 4, pages 28–35. The amount of nicotine in each cigarette was from 6.17 to 12.65 mg (1.23 ± 0.15 percent of tobacco weight in each cigarette) in domestic cigarettes. It was between 7.17-28.86 mg (1.80 ± 0.25 percent of ...


15

It is a common figure of speech to say [small amount] of toxin could kill [large amount] people. (Examples: 1, 2) It is an emotive demonstration of the toxicity, but it openly ignores the complexity of the delivery mechanism - an assumption Rockwell scoffs at. What is more relevant than the figure of speech used to describe the toxicity, is the underlying ...


15

About Rob Pilley, the "zoologist and producer" who gave the Daily news their original quotes. A google scholar search does not turn up any research from him; none of the 120 papers by a R Pilley are zoological in nature. Most of them are probably by other people. He does have a decent list of credits on IMDB. This suggests that he is an expert on making ...


14

Summary The question as asked in the title depends on what you consider "strong evidence". I will therefore have a look at which side makes the better-sourced point. (Which is not just about "protecting people with damaged airways", but several other health effects as well.) One side -- the Umweltbundesamt -- gave references to studies the decision was ...


11

tl;dr: Yes. This Mister Steve Ludwin is quite public about his snake adventures. The details about his method as reported in the popular press are a bit murky and so imprecise that they increase the danger for fellow travellers down this path beyond the insanely high levels it is on already. All snake venoms are not created equal. Different species possess ...


11

There is a set of very old urban legends - fictional stories that are widely believed and passed around as true - which are closely related to this story. In the book The Lore of Scotland: A Guide to Scottish Legends (page 291), one variant is presented: In 1824, an account appeared in print of Aberdeen students ganging up on an unpopular sacrist (a term ...


9

This Belfast Telegraph article explains it a little bit better. The lambs could have been vaccinated recently. The UFU President is also quoted saying there is little risk to the public. Hope that clears things up. Stringent EU regulations mean that animals which have been vaccinated or treated with antibiotics have to be kept out of the food chain ...


8

I would call this one a falsehood. Starting with something peer reviewed and accountable: Individuals with high intakes of dietary fiber appear to be at significantly lower risk for developing coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and certain gastrointestinal diseases. Increasing fiber intake lowers blood pressure and ...


8

The other answer already indicated that the nicotine in a cigarette is probably not enough to kill a person when ingested, but the referred paper actually links to a documented case of someone who ate cigarettes (including all relevant toxins). Here is the relevant part of the conclusion: In spite of the ingestion of 7 up to 20 cigarettes our patient ...


7

Activated carbon is used to treat poisonings and overdoses following oral ingestion. Tablets or capsules of activated carbon are used in many countries as an over-the-counter drug to treat diarrhea, indigestion, and flatulence. However, it is ineffective for a number of poisonings including strong acids or alkali, cyanide, iron, lithium, arsenic, methanol, ...


7

There is at least one citation reporting death in PubMed.1 I was not able to load the article, but having gone trough related literature on tarantula bites, it seems that a bite often causes localized necrotic ulcers,2 which, although not usually lethal, could lead to infection, gangrene, and death if left untreated. Some quick digging through newspaper ...


7

Dioxins are not particularly toxic to people but are deadly to Guinea Pigs and some other animals Note: many of the facts below are from a summary of Dioxin evidence in John Emsley's book The Consumer's Good Chemical Guide. One of the things about dioxins that creates unwarranted worry is that chemists have devised ways to detect them in incredibly small ...


7

Yes, in chemistry labs Cyanide dissolved in DMSO is referred to as "Liquid Death". As this in depth explanation states: The result is obvious: combining DMSO with the wrong compound will rapidly increase the risk of the situation and, if you’re unlucky, the results could be fatal. One such compound DMSO will dissolve is potassium cyanide, making it a ...


7

The principle authority, whose writings are being cited in the OP, seems to be "Dr William Davis". I found a paper titled Wheat Belly—An Analysis of Selected Statements and Basic Theses from the Book which appears to analyze all of Dr Davis' points against wheat. Note: The PDF document settings prevent me from copy/pasting relevent extracts. The paper ...


5

A bit of context. Mr Mihalovic is not a doctor, but an anti-vaccine advocate and a "naturopath" -- in other words: David Mihalovic is an ND, which stands for “naturopathic doctor” or, more appropriately, “not a doctor”. According to himself he “specializes in vaccine research.” It is, however, unclear where that research is published – there are no hits ...


5

No, that estimate is far too low (you'd need seeds of 1-2 orders of magnitude more apples) The amygdalin contents of the apple seeds could gener- ate between 0.06 and 0.2 mg cyanide equivalents per gram of apple seeds; these values are relatively high. Acute cyanide toxicity can occur in humans at doses between 0.5 and 3.5 mg kg⁻¹ body weight (...


4

Copper in the water is not a problem. In fact, in moderation it is necessary for your health. In the United States, a lot of homes use copper plumbing. However, the concentration of copper can be an issue, and letting water sit in copper containers is, in fact, a risk. The average concentration of copper in tap water in the US is between 20 to 75 parts per ...


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