59

The source of the quote is John J. O'Neill's Prodigal Genius: The Life of Nikola Tesla (1944). The story essentially claims what The Oatmeal says: that Tesla went so far as to see machines built with his improved parts before Edison denied him his money. There, I am afraid, the trail ends. O'Neill was a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, but he did not ...


13

Edison was often portrayed as Tesla's rival in early literature about Tesla, which is not quite true. There is no evidence that Edison "stole" ideas from Tesla in the sense of breaking the law. Rather, Tesla worked for an Edison company at one point and came up with many ideas which Edison profited from. Tesla's comparative lack of interest in business and ...


9

There, on any day in 1887, one might have found Edison and his assistants occupied in certain cruel and lugubrious experiments: the electrocution of stray cats and dogs...The feline and canine pets of the West Orange neighborhood were purchased from eager schoolboys at twenty-five cents each and executed in such numbers that the local animal population stood ...


9

Form Thomas Edison's May 14th, 1904 article in Scientific American Supplement No. 1480, page 23711: I soon ascertained why and started a man off for Japan on a bamboo hunt. Before I got through I had tested no fewer than 6,000 vegetable growths, and had ransacked the world for the most suitable bamboo. The use of bamboo was maintained for many years... ...


4

The earliest attribution to Edison I see is in the 1925 New Yorker: Thomas A. Edison once said, “There is no substitute for hard work.” However earlier references make clear that it was James J. Hill. For example, in the article Handling Men For the Big Results System March 1908 it is stated: "There's no substitute for hard work in business," ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible