63

tl;dr: The claim is based on a misrepresentation or misinterpretation of testimony by a co-founder of Fusion GPS. There is no evidence that there ever was an embedded FBI informant in the Trump campaign. Trump's source is this Fox News segment in which Andew McCarthy makes the claim. This Fox News article goes into more depth about what exactly is claimed: ...


38

The mayor's 4th order of 30 April 2020 said, in part: Religious gatherings, including but not limited to, weddings, funerals, memorial services, and wakes, of ten (10) persons inside or ten (10) percent of building occupancy (whichever number is greater) and fifty (50) people outside may resume, provided social distancing is maintained and event ...


26

Update: The New York Times published an article on this so detailed that it seems to supplant all previous information about this informant, at least pending further information: F.B.I. Used Informant to Investigate Russia Ties to Campaign, Not to Spy, as Trump Claims. The article tells us (with an unusual amount of detail for identifying a source intended ...


18

It is technically possible to set up this type of surveillance without raising alarms, and it has been reported by credible sources to have been used by both the FBI and foreign governments to surveil cell phones, as is discussed in this related question. There are well known techniques for surreptitiously "rooting" or "jailbreaking" a phone, which is ...


14

The presidential alerts are part of a bigger system that also includes AMBER alerts and alerts for bad weather and "other threatening emergencies". These alerts are called Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA). FEMA explains how it works: Does WEA know where I am? Is it tracking me? No. Just like emergency weather alerts you see on local TV, WEAs are ...


14

There is a lot wrong with the whole thing here. For a start, when you try and find the original article allegedly written by Professor Kelley which is titled Case Studies of Destabilization and Delusions Described as Radio-wave Transmitted: Behavioral Implications Kathryn Kelley Department of Psychology, University of Albany, State University of New York ...


10

Edward Snowden seems to think so: "Mr Snowden said [UK intelligence agency] GCHQ could gain access to a handset by sending it an encrypted text message and use it for such things as taking pictures and listening in." And via the UK's Express "Nosey Smurf is the 'hot mic' tool, so for example if it's in your pocket they can turn the ...


9

No, conclusively they do not work. There have been many studies done on them and there are several companies that do exactly this kind of debunking. Every major photo enforcement company knows exactly what people will try in order to evade detection and are very adept at either countermeasures or legislation that will prevent you from doing it. Testing from ...


9

I genuinely thought this was unanswerable, because of the weirdness of linking surveillance culture to Ritalin, until I read the attempted answer by Daniel Hicks, where he has trouble finding any information about overprescription of Ritalin in the 1970s. I was convinced that such information is somewhere buried on the Internet, so here's what I found: A ...


6

This isn't a complete answer to your questions, but I'd like to point out that the government doesn't need access to the E911 chip to locate you. Traditionally mobile phone networks were switched networks. They work by locating where you are in the world, and routing your telecoms through a microcell / macrocell transmitter. It's been some time since i ...


6

Comey testified that the FBI was investigating Flynn, Manafort, Page, and Papadopoulos, however the FBI application for a FISA wiretap was turned down and they were told to narrow the focus. A later attempt was granted. Page is the only American to have had his communications directly targeted with a FISA warrant in 2016 as part of the Russia probe, ...


5

The Atlantic article in the question provides references to support its claims: And a group of researchers led by a Berkeley Ph.D. student presented technology at a 2014 conference that could “hear” what people were saying by analyzing the distortions and reflections in Wi-Fi signals created by their moving mouths. The system could determine which words ...


5

Is it possible possible that the NSA possesses portable radar systems that can put out 1 kW? Sure it is. There are mobile units able to output far more than just 1 kW. MIT developed a portable 250 kW radar system back during WWII. The TPQ-36 can output +20 kW and its larger cousin can go well over 100 kW. Define "portable". There are many possible setups ...


4

Yes. And not just by the police. There are existing demonstrated attacks which allow a malicious 3rd party to do so. http://www.computerworld.com/article/2472441/cybercrime-hacking/mobile-rat-attack-makes-android-the-ultimate-spy-tool.html At the RSA conference, there was a particularly scary session called Hacking Exposed: Mobile RAT Edition. CrowdStrike ...


1

Browsing the article it's unclear, but I get a hint that, at one point, Ritalin was being "prescribed" by school districts in New Mexico, and this is the practice that was ended. And the ACLU involvement was rather incidental. But, as I said, it’s unclear — I could not find a reference that spells it out very well. However, the Wikipedia article on Ritalin ...


1

As far as I know there has only been one successful "plot" foiled, involving a San Diego cab driver who gave $8,500 to an al-Qaeda affiliate(archive.org version). Note that the source may have some bias even though it claims to be nonpartisan.


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