215

The study that the company uses to prove that "scalar waves" give human skin the ability to "neutralize" UV rays is bunk, for a multitude of reasons. Instead of commenting on the existence of scalar waves and their purported ability to block UV rays, I investigated their own website to determine what their proof of this supposed finding was. Scrolling down ...


76

In addition to the other excellent answers, which already show that the product is not to be trusted, I'd like to point out two more reasons why one should be worried about the "research" being presented. Firstly I'd like to point out that the article is not published, thus, not peer reviewed. While it might look like actual research, it's just a pdf that ...


61

While anything is possible, there is absolutely no reason to believe these claims, mostly because the claims don't make any sense scientifically. "Scalar waves" is a meaningless term, as claimed to have been applied here. It is a theoretical construct that exists in quantum theory, and the idea that they could imprint it in some sort of permanent, fixed ...


23

Do FDA regulations make US sunscreens less effective than international products? Unlike the EU, FDA regulations do not dictate standards or minimum requirements for UVA protection in sunscreen. Also unlike the EU, labeling relevant to UVA protection is not required (though allowed). The answer on the sister-site (Outdoor.SE) as well as the other three ...


17

tl;dr- The collection of claims about "Harmonized Water" appear to be incoherent gibberish which prevents us from falsifying them ("not even wrong"). If this were a real product, a common chemistry lab device (UV spectrometer) could've easily demonstrated its ability to block UV rays. EDIT: Reference (9) from the PDF on "Harmonized Water" appears to ...


15

In Australia, there is a mandatory standard for the labelling of sunglasses to help the consumer. In 2003, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), a consumer watchdog issued a Regulation Impact Statement about the standard. Here is an historical copy. In the document, they discuss the risks of poor-quality sunglasses. Some are ...


14

This answer addressed the question about whether you can get a sunburn trough a glass window. This is what the title and the last paragraph of the question mentions. The "magnifying glass" part doesn't really fit with that, IMHO, and could be a different questions by itself. According to Can glass block sun rays that cause skin cancer? (cancer research UK) ...


13

Breakdown of the claims There are a couple of claims contained together in this question. Vitamin D is formed on the skin (as well as in). Relatively large amounts remain on the skin or are secreted immediately from sun-sexposure onto the skin. In both cases the vitamins need an up to 48h waiting period to be (re-)absorbed by the body/skin. That washing ...


11

A critical review of the existing evidence for sun-screens has been published. According to it, the concerns about cancer are not well-evidenced. Burnett, M. E. and Wang, S. Q. (2011), Current sunscreen controversies: a critical review. Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine, 27: 58–67. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0781.2011.00557.x They looked at: ...


9

Cars have matt black dashboards to prevent internal reflection into your line of vision (an image of the top of the dashboard reflected in the windscreen). Matt black surfaces absorb light and re-emit the energy as heat. Reflective surfaces don't. Update: Undesirable effects that may be alleviated by a sunshade include: Heating of car interior above a ...


6

Yes, if you use sunscreen. No, if you use sunblock. Sunscreen absorbs an amount of radiation, but not all (sun protection factor is used to measure effectiveness): Sunscreen [...] absorbs or reflects some of the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the skin exposed to sunlight and thus helps protect against sunburn [1]. Sunscreen combines organic and ...


5

There seems to be indeed not much done for this research on a definitively not patentable solution. Most online sources craving credibility for this claim mention the University of Pittsburgh. Sometimes even "a paper from". But trying to follow that lead I ended up at a page where a nurse tells just her own anecdotal story of how she herself once found great ...


5

This paper, for example, lists cases of solar retinopathy which suffered by people who were using glass (smoked glass, stained glass, sunglasses, etc.): Brit. J. Ophthal. (I969) 53, 534 Visual prognosis after solar retinopathy P. A. MAcFAUL Injury is most likely to occur only on determined fixation, and even when this lasts for only a brief period ...


5

Yes. From the UK's National Health Service: Snow, sand, concrete and water can reflect the sun’s rays onto your skin, and the sun is more intense at high altitudes. and as CPerkins commented, WebMD: Whether you are near reflective surfaces, such as water, white sand, concrete, snow, and ice.


4

TL;DR: Skin is affected by exposure to UV irradiation from the sun and repeated exposure to harmful factors in the environment is noted to cause the typical photo aged skin having coarse wrinkles. However, the effect of sun-exposure causing these wrinkles is difficult to quantify or measure. Skin, like many other organs, undergoes deleterious changes with ...


4

"Permanent damage to the retina has been shown to occur in ~100 seconds" Source: http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=3269 A similar statement: "sungazing at bright midnoon for 100 s can produce a threshold lesion." Source: W. T. Ham, Jr., H. A Mueller, and D. H. Sliney Retinal sensitivity to damage from short wavelength light Nature 260, 153-155 (...


4

This Health Canada page says, "For most people, an inexpensive pair of sunglasses will do the job" and "Look for a label that lists the type and amount of protection" (with details on how much protection to expect). It also says, "Sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation varies from one person to the next", and "Some scientists believe that routine exposure to ...


3

Answer copied in part from: Does sun screen cause cancer? A critical review of the existing evidence for sun-screens has been published. Burnett, M. E. and Wang, S. Q. (2011), Current sunscreen controversies: a critical review. Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine, 27: 58–67. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0781.2011.00557.x They looked at: Whether ...


3

There are many alternatives to sunscreen, the most obvious of which you already put in your question: just stay out of direct sunlight during midday. At best sunscreen is convenient. Furthermore, this well-referenced article argues that there may be health risks to the pervasive use of sunscreens. The article is a bit old, though, so it doesn't take into ...


2

There is some truth behind this, according to Andrew Young, who cites numerous papers in his research: Thermal damage (not really a “burn”) is possible under conditions of a partial eclipse, when only a little of the Sun is exposed, and the pupil opens up to adapt to the low overall light level; but it is unlikely in normal daytime conditions. He ...


1

No not at all. Being near-water decreases the chance of sunburn! From a light or UV scenario the claim is false and the NHS is incorrect. Now snow and white concrete are true. A common misunderstanding I'm afraid Rory. Water is not reflective. Being near a sea or Lake as you state would actually be better than just being outside (Figure 2), all other things ...


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