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44

First of all I will assume that by sugar we mean sucrose, which is the common table sugar. Here is the structural formula for sucrose: Source: Wikipedia - Sucrose If you are not familiar with chemical structures for organic compounds, note that every "corner" in a chemical structure like this is considered to be a carbon atom (C), even if it is not ...


35

Hysteria around the aspartame in diet drinks is not justified by the evidence It is quite hard to prove a negative but the simple observation that hundreds of millions of people take aspartame containing drinks every day without apparently causing any notable epidemiological evidence of all the effects should be of some significance. As far as I can tell no ...


24

"One element away" is pretty much nonsense, and there are lots of kinds of sugar. Let's ask a more targeted question: Are some sugars closely related chemically to cocaine or any other drug? Yes, but it's not cocaine. It's the most commonly used recreational drug, alcohol. Ethanol, the alcohol in beverages, is H H | | H - ...


15

FDA According to the US FDA PART 172 -- FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Subpart I--Multipurpose Additives Sec. 172.804 Aspartame. ... (a) Aspartame is the chemical 1-methyl N- l-[alpha]-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine (C14H18N2O5). ... 2) The label of any food containing the additive shall ...


13

Summary: Based on current research, there is evidence from several studies that higher tax on drinks with high sugar content might reduce sugar consumption. However, researchers feel that the levied sugar taxes might only reduce the average sugar consumption globally by a small amount. But Jack Winkler, emeritus professor of nutrition policy at London ...


13

No. A fairly recent study performed at MIT has outlined a potential alternative pathway that's probably very common, as the study points out that lack of glucose and oxygen is not an uncommon state for cancer cells: Much of the body’s supply of oxygen and glucose is carried in the bloodstream, but blood vessels often do not penetrate far into the body of ...


12

Yes. McDonald's state they they apply sugar to their fries. This bit below is from the McDonald's Australia website. Q: Do you add sugar to the fries? A: We know that you want beautiful, golden brown French fries. Potatoes already naturally contain sugars that, when cooked, can rise to the surface in places and result in unevenly coloured French ...


12

There is emerging evidence of a small effect suggesting HFCS is worse than sucrose and increases prevalence of diabetes and obesity There is, superficially at least, some reason to doubt that HFCS should be bad. Conventional sugar (chemically sucrose) is made of the smaller sugar molecules glucose and fructose and as wikipedia points out: In humans and ...


9

All fats do not have the same effect on the body when ingested even though they possess a similar chemical structure. All fats have a similar chemical structure: a chain of carbon atoms bonded to hydrogen atoms. What makes one fat different from another is the length and shape of the carbon chain and the number of hydrogen atoms connected to the carbon ...


8

Americans approximately consume about 5 billion hamburgers a year and it is presumed that most hamburgers are composed primarily of meat. However, research by Prayson B et.al. in 2008 shows that: Meat content in the hamburgers ranged from 2.1% to 14.8% (median, 12.1%). The cost per gram of hamburger ranged from $0.02 to $0.16 (median, $0.03) and did not ...


6

The paper cited is available online. It does not exactly claim that artificially sweetened beverages ("ASBs") "do not help people lose weight". What it actually says is this: In summary, the available evidence does not directly support a role of ASBs in inducing weight gain or metabolic abnormalities but also does not consistently demonstrate that ASBs ...


5

Yes. Temperate Fruit Crops in Warm Climates at page 178: A general objective in most breeding programs is higher sugar content See Survey of Food and Nutrition Research in the United States, which lists a publication titled: Fruit breeding. Improvement in color, flavor, sugar content, and yield of apricots, plums, peaches, nectarines, sweet cherries, ...


4

There is absolutely a correlation between high glucose levels and the increased risk of infection, so I understand the concern. Most of the time, high glucose levels would be a sign of diabetes, so for them, yes, eating sugar will cause infection. There are other reasons people sometimes have high glucose levels, such as infection (that's not a typo, they ...


4

The acidity of the "soda" is the issue that contributes a lot to tooth decay. The can says "Phosphoric Acid." See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphoric_acid Phosphoric Acid may also reduce bone density. Carbonic Acid is also present ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonic_acid). I find Wikipedia useful as television has shown us most people might not ...


3

Auto-brewery syndrome is a well-known but rare condition in which yeast living in the digestive tract can consume carbohydrates (sugars) producing alcohol, causing the host to become drunk even though he or she never consumed any alcohol. The yeast can overgrow in such conditions, persisting seemingly indefinitely until treated. Treatment comes in the form ...


2

Sugar plays a role too, but the personality traits are more important. Sugar can induce reward and craving that are comparable in magnitude to those induced by addictive drugs. The neural substrates of sugar and sweet reward appear to be more robust than those of cocaine. Although this evidence is limited by the inherent difficulty of comparing different ...


2

According to the 2013 book "Salt, Sugar, Fat" by Michael Moss, while humans are born with tastes for fat and sugar (they provoke pleasurable responses in newborns), the taste for salt is acquired (newborns do not enjoy it, but virtually all other humans in the First World do). If a person abstains from consuming salt for a time, they will regain their ...


2

This is what the American Heart Association recommends, straight from the horse's mouth: The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends limiting the amount of added sugars you consume to no more than half of your daily discretionary calories allowance. For most American women, that’s no more than 100 calories per day, or about 6 teaspoons of sugar. For ...


1

In a recent study, diet soda consumption was linked with greater incidence of vascular events: Controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption, BMI, daily calories, consumption of protein, carbohydrates, total fat, saturated fat, and sodium, those who drank diet soft drinks daily (vs. none) had an ...


1

Yes, probably. Using the same link to the American Diabetes Association (http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/myths/): Myth: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. Fact: The answer is not so simple. Type 1 diabetes is caused by genetics and unknown factors that trigger the onset of the disease; type 2 diabetes is caused by genetics and lifestyle ...


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