Hot answers tagged

91

Definitely not. Here's a video of a science reporter, Veritasium, staying in an anaechoic chamber for one hour, in the dark. Not only they do so at the first attempt, but they come out of it convinced they could have stayed indefinitely -- that there was no "driving crazy effect". Clearly this is weak evidence by scientific standards, but the evidence ...


20

Sensory Deprivation Apparently if you block or disrupt any of the senses for long enough it can cause hallucinations. So the answer would be yes for some people hallucinations are a possibility. Your question reminded me of floatation tanks, otherwise known as isolation chambers, where you float yourself in highly concentrated saltwater in a light and ...


17

This depends on the design of the bomb. Some bombs made whistling sounds, as explained in this answer on the History site. Another famous bomb was the so-called "Buzzbomb", aka V-1 rocket, used by the Nazis, primarily against Great Britian during WW II. It didn't whistle, but did make a loud buzzing noise.


15

No, it seems that the 528hz claim is either completely made up, or at best based off of recordings artificially adjusted to be heard by humans. The Sun simply doesn't oscillate that quickly or that consistently for the claim to be believable. Why 528hz is not realistic: Helioseismology is both an awesome word and the research field concerned with studying ...


14

According to the 1832 book Six Months in America, volume II, at page 67: At certain seasons of the year, their tramping and bellowing may be heard at a vast distance on the plains, by putting the ear to the ground; and in this way, if heard in the morning, incredible as it may appear, it will sometimes be evening before the hunters can come up with them. ...


11

A similar type of unexpected large sound, the Seneca Guns or Barisal Guns, has been recorded for centuries. While there is no firm explanation, they are believed to be the result of the atmosphere unexpectedly magnifying loud sounds, such as thunder, ship cannons, or, yes, heavy machinery. While it is not clear how this hypothesis could be tested, most other ...


10

The April 24, 2012 episode of Skeptoid (#307) covers this. There are several claims as to the origin of the sound. The most popular (albeit not very well supported) is that it is a looped bit from a 1972 movie called Baron Blood. If you go to the Skeptoid page, about two thirds down, this is discussed. So if we can't verify any part of the story, where ...


7

No. It's the opposite: noise cancelling headphones typically reduce fatigue. The opposing sound waves generated by active noise cancellation technology end up blocking key parts of the sound spectrum (aka your music). Not correct. The noise cancellation blocks outside sound, but doesn't not affect the spectrum of the music. Overall the transfer ...


7

It's a scientifically studied, yet not fully explained phenomenon which affects around 2% of population around specific foci. There's is a good review of studies on low frequency noise which dedicates a full chapter to "The HUM" and its effect The HUM 11.1 Occurrence. The Hum is the name given to a low frequency noise which is causing ...


6

There is a least one article written by someone who enjoyed their time in the Orfield anechoic chamber. He mentioned that the human body itself produces a substantial amount of noise (heart beating, lungs breathing, digestive tract rumbling), and the absolute quiet of the chamber highlights these sounds. The Guardian - Experience the quietest place on ...


5

The usual formulation of this question is "Can a double-blind A/B/X test distinguish between 44,100 Hz audio and a higher sample rate?" The answer is a very clear "no". Probably the best demonstration is this test by the Audio Engineering Society where participants were asked to distinguish a recording on Super Audio CD (effectively 100KHz) or DVD-A (...


5

"Better" is a vague term which could be "more accurate", "more often preferred", or a number of other things. For simplicity: I will assume the question is one of fidelity. A CD has a lower minimum frequency at volume and a greater dynamic range (Fries, Bruce; Marty Fries (2005). Digital Audio Essentials. O'Reilly Media. p. 147. ISBN 0-596-00856-2) than ...


3

Given the reason for your question, I'd suggest an air vortex cannon as another device that could be used to that effect. On that basis, I will answer yes — air vortex cannons can knock over brick walls: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IyAyd4WnvhU#t=141


3

tl;dr: No, cockatoos output ~3000x less sound energy than jet engines, even taking claims of 135 dB at face value. Loudness measurements are, broadly speaking, a mess when it comes to answering questions like these. Loudness is often measured for occupational health and safety reasons, and in these situations you put the microphone at the natural distance ...


3

Per Dr. Diana Deutsch, perceptual and cognitive psychologist at University of California - San Diego, peer reviewed research is yet to be performed. "All of this can be put to experiment, rather than a matter of opinion. People could judge blind pieces in A440 versus A432." Per concluding remarks of Emmanuel Comte's Is 'A' 432 Hz a myth?, "432 Hz is a ...


1

I read the papers that Mohammad Sakib Arifin cited in this answer but I came to a different conclusion, so I thought I would write another answer. I found that the "research" on this subject is lacking a controlled, blinded study with a reasonable sample size. Without these basic elements of study design, it's easy to reach wrong conclusions due to effects ...


1

Do Audio-Visual-Stimulation/Psychowalkman/Mind Machine devices work? Various scientific studies indicate that Audio Visual Stimulation does work. According to this paper, several studies have shown that Audio Visual Stimulation improves IQ, behaviour, attention, impulsiveness, hyperactivity, anxiety, depression, ODD and reading level. Attention Deficit ...


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