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20

The article refers to the northbound Zhuozhou Toll Gate at the G4 motorway just south of the Beijing city boundary. As you can see on the aerial photography from Google Maps, at this location, the G4 motorway has 8 lanes (4 in each direction): https://www.google.de/maps/@39.5485894,116.0341314,675m/data=!3m1!1e3


12

Heavier cars are safer than light cars. Larger cars are safer than small cars. This applies to SUV's as well especially since rollover is not a factor in late model SUV's with standard stability control. Crash rates from both types of vehicles are similar, with the heavier/bigger vehicle having a major safety advantage. From the IIHS Status Report, Special ...


11

In the UK (for example), tyre repairs must, by law, conform to British Standard BSAU159f:1990. It is likely that equivalent standards exist in your locale. Provided that the repair is made to the standard, the tyre will be safe to use. I imagine the standards apply to normal road use, not when the vehicle is to be used for motorsport or under extreme ...


10

I asked a very similar question yesterday on History and after reading more about it, I believe the answer is not absolutely clear. In any case, this article from New Scientist seems to provide the clearest answer I've found so far. Rather than because of being left-handed, Napoleon seems to have been keen on changing centuries-long traditions for the sake ...


7

I know this is long since solved, but I was looking into it a bit. If you consider an overhead image of the area that was jammed: http://a.abcnews.com/images/International/RT_beijing_traffic_1_jt_151008_4x3_992.jpg You can see that there is far more than 1 car per lane in the plaza. In fact I'm counting 50 cars across which may be where that number came ...


4

Not exactly an answer, but there are two physical points that are more-or-less inescapable: In a vehicle--vehicle collision the more massive body is subjected to smaller accelerations than the lighter one. Mass is favored here. Some readers may remembers those crash test films from the 1970s that show this effect all too well (but see the link on "quality ...


4

Maybe there's a basis, but if so, it doesn't come from official statistics. From the CIA World Factbook on roadways, the United States (#1) and China (#3) have 7,758,605 km of paved roads in their official road networks. USA Roadways: total: 6,586,610 km country comparison to the world: 1 paved: 4,304,715 km (includes 76,334 km of expressways) unpaved: 2,...


2

Obviously, my source is looking at headlights. However if one has internet access you can look it up. Wikipedia seemed to have the most info in one spot but additional info at other sites would be helpful . Lumens (L) are a measure of the amount of light. Old sealbeams = ?, early halogens = 1550 L later halogens =1820 L newest halogens = 2100 L HID = ...


2

(too long for a comment) are, supposing the fix has been done properly, repaired tires in general as good as new ones. If the answer is no, then I know for sure that my specific tire at least has a chance of being unsafe, and I can have it replaced by a new one. You are asking three different things, and I think that is the cause of the confusion here. "...


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