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14

Yes. In My Life and Work (1922) Ford wrote: Therefore in 1909 I announced one morning, without any previous warning, that in the future we were going to build only one model, that that model was going to be Model "T", that the chassis would be exactly the same for all cars and I remarked: "Any customer can have a car painted any color that he ...


78

This is something of an urban myth - the drying time gains were made by using oven-dried enamel coatings on the parts that could withstand the required curing temperatures. The so-called "baked enamel" coating used by Ford was called "Japan Black" (produced for Ford by APV Engineered Coatings) - this is an asphalt-based enamel coating which is applied to ...


9

More or less, yes. According to this source in the first 5 years model T's came in different colors- green, bright red, dark blue, brown, maroon and gray (this is supported by other sources as well) The model T came only in black from 1914 through 1925, and the article quotes a model T expert named Guy Zaninovich (this book mentions him as a model T ...


8

The United States Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) reports that there are 272,480,899 vehicles that are registered for for highway use as of 2017. An additional 63,759 mass transit buses are also registered. Given a population estimate of 327,167,434 as of July 1, 2018 of which 22.4% are below the age of 18, that gives ...


18

There is no reason to doubt that Churchill explicitly mentioned Rolls-Royce in the context of the quote. A Google Books search limited to books published before 1960 returns at least four publications that feature the Churchill quote including the Rolls-Royce reference: Jackson, G. G. (1930). The world's aeroplanes and airships, p. 173. IPC Transport ...


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