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22

I don't think this is correct. Your eye muscles might get 'tired' but there's no reason for damage to the eye to occur in terms of vision. Our eyes have evolved to compensate for motion very well. There is a similar myth that reading in low light damages the eye. You're more likely to have a problem with car sickness. This is thought to be caused by a ...


19

I don't know any specific research regarding "Comic Sans" and dyslexics, but there are at least a few fonts designed by and for dyslexics to ease reading. Two examples are the free OpenDyslexic font by Abelardo Gonzalez or the commercial Dyslexie font by Christian Boer. Christian Boer is a dyslexic, Dutch graphics designer, who has used his own experiences ...


16

Ironically, it appears that this claim has been badly mangled by the claimants due to poor literacy skills! Let's start with definitions. Here is how Health Literacy: A Review distinguishes between "literacy" and "health literacy". Literacy is defined as the basic ability to read and speak English, whereas functional health literacy is the ability to ...


11

No independent peer review has this tested. The circumstantial evidence for this is good but leads to expectations that indicates a limited applicability and a temporary, small effect. This is not a Nuremberg funnel. The font was developed by people at a university at RMIT’s Behavioural Business Lab. And the psychological base theory for this is called ...


10

According to the CIA World Factbook the literacy rate for people over 15 in the US is 99%. The claim may relate to "functional illiteracy," which seems to be a more nebulous concept: A definition of literacy and/or functional literacy acceptable to all industrialized countries neither exists nor is it desirable (whatever inconvenience this may mean for ...


9

There's no evidence that Comic Sans works well for dyslexics; it appears to be a myth. There are a ton of commonly used fonts that are great for dyslexia, like Helvetica, Courier, Arial, and Verdana. The biggest factor in readability for dyslexics isn't font anyway, it's context: for example, the line height and kerning, the amount of white space on the ...


8

That Wikipedia article and several visible results from Google searches on this topic appear to draw their information from a Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute press release, http://news.rpi.edu/luwakkey/3074. Going back to the source, it does indeed indicate that exposure to self-luminous displays for less than two hours still has an effect. The actual ...


8

Amber tinted screens do not make the device better for reading in the sense that they allow you to read more easily. The purpose of the tint is to diminish the effect that the phone's screen has on your sleep cycle. Studies indicate that bright blue lights can interfere with the body's sleep cycle by changing one's levels of melatonin, a hormone that ...


4

Though not addressing any sort of "speed" reading, a review of literature suggests no statistically significant difference. Loh et al. studied 66 college students in 2002. They found the mean times to read passages with two spaces after each period was longer than reading passages with one space, but with their small sample size were unable to conclude ...


3

No exactly like that, but the lack of outdoor/intense light exposure is an environmental risk factor in developing myopia. This factor is directly correlated with education, at least as currently practiced in East Asia, so a gene x environment interaction is probably the best description. The mechanism how lack of exposure to intense light causes myopia is ...


3

Guessing it does not count as science-related: iPads are so bad for your healthy sleep that even Apple offers now a redshifting feature in newer devices. But that is partially because: Evening use of light-emitting eReaders negatively affects sleep, circadian timing, and next-morning alertness: Moreover, the observation that the endogenous circadian ...


3

According to this letter addressed to Mr. Howard Stephen Berg from Cyd Smith, the Assistant director of Guinness Book of World Records (1990): Dear Mr. Berg: We have accepted your speed reading claim for the inclusion in the 1990 edition of the GUINNESS BOOK OF WORLD RECORDS but we are unable to use any of your photographs. Also regarding the ...


2

Probably not. The standard clinical research assessment method for evaluating reading performance seems to be the New International Reading Speed Texts (IReST.) cite 1 cite 2 cite 3 As far as I've been able to discover, there's never been any studies done on "PX Project" using the IReST. Perhaps a better researcher could find something. On this basis, I'...


2

The last claim is probably not true. If you spend one hour per day for 7 years reading, you will invest 365 times 7 = 2555 hours learning about your chosen subject (ignoring leap years). This time will never be sufficient make you an expert in your field. According to the European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System, which aims to standardize ...


2

Evidence regarding the use of highlighting for benefit in learning is mixed per Carole L. Yue et.al. in 2014 and under some conditions, highlighting can be a beneficial study strategy for learning. Quoting Andy DeSoto's answer in 2012, "it might make sense to only use highlighting (or colors, fonts, etc.) to highlight key points, etc.; much like what we ...


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