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153

The tweet in question (alternative archive link) was very likely sent from a fake account (although Twitter being what it is, this is unlikely to ever be conclusively proven either way). The account that seems to be her real Twitter (@Sashapanther93) has denied any connection with the tweet (and its message). In addition, the same thing was said by the ...


111

No: This is ¾ of the/a slogan of/blurb for the tabletop RPG Eclipse Phase, not a quote from Peter Thiel. Eclipse Phase describes itself as “the post-apocalyptic game of transhuman horror”. The full quote is Your mind is software. Program it. Your body is a shell. Change it. Death is a disease. Cure it. Extinction is approaching. Fight it. You can see the ...


93

The tweet is still available in the wayback archives. The account in question is suspended from twitter, but the archives show that this was an account that was only active for a short time in August 2020 with 3 followers and no blue checkmark. Absence any evidence linking Johnson to the account or the ideas espoused there, the most likely explanation is ...


76

Let's clarify, there's no "Antifa in Portland" organization. There's a lot of groups who identify as Antifa in the City of Portland, Oregon, and a lot of groups who don't but are labelled Antifa anyway. Anyone can claim to be Antifa. Antifa is short for Anti-Fascist, and refers to an activist stance rather than a specific organization. Yes he was ...


58

Yes, according to The San Francisco Examiner, the source of the quote is a 1972 poll of people of interest done by that year’s “Georgia Peanut Princess”, Paulette Brown: This year's Georgia Peanut Princess Paulette Brown has taken a poll to end all polls among a variety of presidential candidates and public figures she wanted to know how they stand on ...


58

Yes, in so far as he allegedly told these lines a reporter from the New York Times and was then quoted in that way in the New York Times. An image slightly manipulated to show the date and source: In its surrounding context: In text form: Senator Harry Truman, Democrat, of Missouri, suggested that the United States helps whichever side seemed to be losing....


36

It's difficult to prove a negative, especially when the purported quote is a translation with no reference to the original. But signs point to no. I tried searching for a possible French original and found nothing, but there are so many possible ways this could have been said that the only word that is very likely to be present is “Bible” (spelled the same ...


35

The article in question seems to be "Research on Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Influenza Virus: The Way Forward". The abstract is: The voluntary moratorium on gain-of-function research related to the transmissibility of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus should continue, pending the resolution of critical policy questions concerning the rationale for ...


21

The Washington Post has the article A flu virus risk worth taking by Anthony S. Fauci, Gary J. Nabel and Francis S. Collins (December 30, 2011). It seems unlikely that this is the "paper from 2012" that they were referring to but nonetheless it seems especially relevant as an easier to read article expressing Fauci's opinions on the subject: [I]...


14

As formulated: yes. But it's more complicated. Homeopaths did not invent this principle. They interpret it in a peculiar and very far reaching way. First, we should note that 'Hippokrates' is somewhat elusive as a person or 'writer', since the writings we categorize in the corpus hippocraticum are a large collection of texts spanning a timeframe exceeding ...


14

Yes, Nancy Pelosi said this, and C-SPAN has the video: Speaker Pelosi on Coronavirus Economic Aid Package. You can navigate to the correct part by clicking on the text in the automatically-generated transcript (though note it was not edited and has mistakes like "crockery" when she really said "quackery"). Pelosi already received the ...


12

As of roughly August 2021, per a note on Lemmino's video investigating the origins of Lisa Holst, Snopes founder David Mikkelson has admitted to fabricating the PC Professional article and the writer. Avery's anagram was correct.


12

There is such a quote floating around. But it is of some dubious quality, only written down long after the fact, by people not involved in the actual conversation. The saying is dated to 1933, said by Hitler to Bosch in a private meeting. Bosch then told his version to colleagues. And those start to write down this anecdote years after the war, starting ...


12

This appears to be true Tyranny of the Status Quo, by Milton Friedman and Rose D. Friedman, 1984, Pg. 115: Each recession has produced government spending programs supposedly as a temporary device to create jobs. But nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program. Those programs have typically moved into high gear only after the economy was on ...


12

To a bit more history here, there's a 1998 book Soaring and Settling by Rita Gross, which has a different take/version (p. 43): I am just as frustrated that many Caucasian Buddhists, reasonably sophisticated in their assessments of certain elements of Christian tradition that are woefully out of date, will believe anything as long as it is said by a ...


11

Slightly restricted 'Yes'. It seems to be a genuine quote. At least not a so overly recent American invented quote, made up on the net, as the initial searches suggested, but quite a bit older at least. The source seems to be a Holocaust survivor, Mark Berkowitz, on whom Mengele experimented on. Caveats: this is attested only orally by one of the then young ...


9

There is precedent for the first three lines that predate the game, Eclipse Phase mentioned in Antal Spector-Zabusky's answer. A clever game designer put them together to fit their game concept. Your mind is software Found this book chapter from 1994: 'The Mind as the Software of the Brain' (An Invitation to Cognitive Science, edited by D. Osherson, L. ...


8

I see no evidence that he actually said these things. I believe one of the principal sources for these quotations is this ad by Common Sense for Drug Policy, which ran in 2006. It claims to be a summary of the 1998 book Drug Crazy, but the bold quotations do not appear anywhere in that book. The book From Bud to Brain: A Psychiatrist's View of Marijuana by ...


8

@JoeW correctly pointed out that Milton Friedman did use that phrase. However he wasn't the first to use it. According to Google's book search, the oldest example that I could find is from the "Royal United Service Institution Journal" from 1888: I fear they will verify Lord Palmerston's saying, that nothing is so permanent as a temporary ...


8

I was tempted to close this question, because you already have an answer. On the one side, is a non-notable claim from your confused friend. On the other, Goodreads provides a specific reference to an author and book. Sure enough: on page 181 of A Mountain of Crumbs by Elena Gorokhova:


8

Napoleon born: 1769 First known attestation: 1716 Conclusion: NO! (Not the first at least.) It's that easy to prove this negative. But in its place we only find the allegation that it was really Charles II who said it, referring to Isaac Vossius: This Learned Divine, said he, is a very strange Man: He believes every thing but the Bible. (Alternative link ...


8

There have been similar phrases uttered by many different people. Very often, it is said by religious leaders attacking atheism, especially by creationists attacking Darwinism. Attribution to Napoleon goes back a long way. Here's a book from 1883. Note that the anecdote is uncited, and told by an anti-Darwinist. Very probably apocryphal. It is related of ...


6

The closest information I could find on the matter is from the book The Unknown Capablanca by David Brandreth and Dale Hooper, which contains the following passage amidst the transcripts of some of the games played at the House of Commons (p. 158): During the display one player tried to put in an extra move, as is the way with politicians; but the Cuban, ...


6

I know this is an old question but I think I have a relevant answer. Tagging on to what Laurel's answer details about similar wording from other sources; it is inscribed on Dodd Hall at FSU which was built in 1923: "The half of knowledge is to know where to find knowledge." After looking around for a bit I found this PDF which says that this is ...


5

Sort of, and "perhaps". There is a saying that is attributed to him, similar to the one used in the movie, but coming from a poisoned well of unreliability. There seems to be no reliable written record by himself and this does not seem to appear in any of his official and transcribed speeches. But even in the documented variant there is ample doubt ...


4

The transcription in the question is an accurate representation of her speech, which is available on the C-SPAN vido attached to this tweet The pause in her speech between "herd immunity" and "quackery" could be interpreted as apposition or it could be enumeration - that is, referring to something else, e.g. the promotion of ...


4

Yes, this is a real quote by Vincent van Gogh (although translated). It is included in the page for Vincent van Gogh on Wikiquote, which is generally a good resource for verifying (alleged) quotes. As found on Wikiquote, the quote was written by Vincent van Gogh in a letter to his brother, know as 'Letter 22'. The full letter is available online, including ...


3

Here is a video of Archbishop Tutu telling the joke, published a year after the question was asked.


2

I found a possible origin here: https://quoteinvestigator.com/2015/04/02/simple/#:~:text=Dear%20Quote%20Investigator%3A%20The%20following,Simplicity%20is%20the%20ultimate%20sophistication. tl;dr: The earliest citation is from "Clare Boothe Luce", playwrighter who became one of the first female U.S. Ambassadors. In 1931 she published a novel titled “...


1

As per the comment by @GEdgar, a book was published in 1986 , two years before the Hawking attribution in Chinese, that contains the following poem : Most of what I really need/ To know about how to live/ And what to do and how to be/ I learned in kindergarten./ Wisdom was not at the top/ Of the graduate school mountain,/ But there in the sandpile at Sunday ...


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