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94

The claims are two wrong, one sort of correct Before we start, it might be worth noting though that a strong magnetic field is more likely to keep radiation out than letting it in (*). Anyway, the Earth's magnetic field at the surface, measured in nanotesla, and sourced from here. The image below has the locations in question marked with yellow stars (thank ...


19

I believe the answer is that it's undoubtedly non-factual. The linked text confuses the terms the manuscript tries to discuss. I am positive that the Bhagavata passage is a reiteration of a much older concept. I will address the claims in the text mentioned by this question one by one. Bhagavata Purana is not 5100 years old. There is some dispute but it is ...


11

Summary: As a general rule, window glass blocks UVB while passing UVA. If the amount of UV really matters, then you need to look up the appropriate chart for the type of glass you really have. The UV transmission of glass has been tested in many ways over many years. People have the results of those tests in mind when they speak about UV and glass. It has ...


10

Has non-TSI solar output increased over the past century in ways the IPCC climate models ignore? Probably not. What Prof. Shaviv has done is shown that it is possible to make a simple climate model which replicates climate change by adding certain parameters the IPCC does not use. What they have not shown is whether this has any relation to reality. The ...


7

No, atoms are quite real. The linked book does not seem coherent nor make any testable claims. Instead lets see about the evidence for atoms. First direct observation of atoms was done by Rutherford in the famous scattering experiment: Rutherford scattering. tried to find a photo of an atom, but each photo seemed like a cartoon or 3d drawing more than a ...


7

In a manner of speaking, yes. “A certain infinite spirit pervades all space into infinity, and contains and vivifies the entire world,” Newton wrote in his journals, musing on the ancient wisdom of pre-Christian philosophers like Thales of Miletus (c.646-548 B.C.), who believed the gods were present in all things. Newton was convinced that prisca sapientia, ...


5

No SkepticalScience discusses various ways people have tried to claim that the sun has caused the recent warming of Earth, and they're just generally not justifiable. There are a number of studies that try to attribute warming just from statistical correlation, like Foster & Rahmstorf 2011, and they inevitably find essentially no solar effect, usually ...


4

A partial answer, based on the 2011 paper, Quantifying the role of solar radiative forcing over the 20th century, by Shaviv and Shlomi Ziskin: Well, it turns out Shaviv and Ziskin do not make clear positive claims regarding what makes up that contributing factor of solar activity. They only make the basic assumptions that some kind of "Indirect solar/...


3

Some do believe that he was indeed partial to a belief in the supernatural. In this article there is a quote from John Maynard Keynes: This Newton “was not the first of the age of reason,” Keynes concluded. “He was the last of the magicians." In large part credited to his volumes of text written on alchemy. From the same article there is also a quote ...


2

All the sources for the saying that I came across contain additional statements which limit to which cases this wisdom can be applied. For example: Overigens moet je hier wel mee oppassen en zijn er twee verschillende soorten kraken van elkaar te onderscheiden. Lange doffe kraken betekent sterk ijs, maak je geen zorgen. Korte felle kraken en breekgeluiden ...


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