101

If Homer talks about the dark-wine sea, it seems he also talks about the "blue eyebrows of Poseidon". You can read here about Homer's colorful descriptions that helped orators remember the verses of his poems. κυανό is known to be "blue" for ancient greeks and became "cyan" in english. In this book about Homer writing, κυανό entry represents "smalt, blue ...


90

The first claim is based on the research of Berlin and Kay "Basic Color Terms", which posits the hypothesis that languages evolve colour terms in the following order, and therefore that ancient languages did not possess separate terms for blue and green: Stage I: Dark-cool and light-warm Stage II: Red Stage III: Either green or yellow Stage IV: Both green ...


31

Ancient Hebrew has the word תכלת for blue (or more specifically, azure), as attested to in the Bible: Numbers 15:38: Speak to the children of Israel and you shall say to them that they shall make for themselves fringes on the corners of their garments, throughout their generations, and they shall affix a thread of sky blue [wool] on the fringe of each ...


26

Interesting. I came to this question predicting I would find a long history of anaesthetic use in infants, lagging a little behind the adults (until the anaesthetics had been demonstrated to be safe and effective.) I expected that any doctors subscribing to the view that infants don't need anaesthetic would be maverick outliers. I found a lot of indirect ...


17

As pointed out in the comments, we have to distinguish two different concepts when talking about the relation between sex/gender and colors: the ability to assign different names to different shades (color naming) and the ability to perceptually distinguish shades with different physical attributes (color discrimination). There are several studies that ...


15

This addresses the second claim. There are 4 types of photoreceptive neurons in your eye. One is the rod, which is sensitive to green but creates a black/white percept (for "scotopic" or night-adjusted vision) and the other 3 are cones with various types of rhodopsin, a receptor that is sensitive to photons. In a normal, unmutated (non-colorblind) person, ...


8

Concerning the second claim, the differences seem to be cultural/linguistic, not genetic according to this article from the American Psychological Association: The study tracked color naming, comprehension and memory in two populations over three years. Researchers led by Debi Roberson, PhD, of the University of Essex, compared young English children with ...


7

Specifically regarding women having two copies of the X chromosome, there have been a very small number of cases where women have been confirmed as "tetrachromatic" - that is, their two X chromosomes produce different versions of the red and green cones, resulting in sensitivity to four different colors, rather than the usual three. However, it seems likely ...


5

I found the following words in the Latin dictionary at http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/ caesĭtĭus (-cĭus ), a, um, adj. id., I. [select] bluish, dark blue: “linteolum,” Plaut. Ep 2, 2, 46; cf. Doed. Syn. III. p. 17. cūmātĭlis (cȳm- ), e, adj. from κῦμα, with the Lat. ending ilis. I. Adj., of the waves: “deus,” i. e. Neptune, Commod. 10, 1.— B. Esp., ...


5

Yes, there are testimonials that Kopi Luwak has a distinct flavor, at least to the trained palette of coffee enthusiasts. However, there seems little consensus that it's a particularly good coffee. One cupper says: The kopi luwak was again smooth and silky with deep chocolate notes and a pleasant earthiness to it. The Honduran was vibrant and citrusy, ...


5

"Better" is a vague term which could be "more accurate", "more often preferred", or a number of other things. For simplicity: I will assume the question is one of fidelity. A CD has a lower minimum frequency at volume and a greater dynamic range (Fries, Bruce; Marty Fries (2005). Digital Audio Essentials. O'Reilly Media. p. 147. ISBN 0-596-00856-2) than ...


4

Referring to analysis by skeptics such as Brian Dunning, Noah Nez and Gordon Bonnet on the claim of Native Americans with long hair having tracking abilities, there are no well known tracking Native American elite units who fought in Vietnam when one searches through the US defense archives. Trackers were known to employed by the Union Army and the ...


4

To clarify, I see four claims you are skeptical about: Ancient people literally were not able to perceive the color blue. The linked article states: Greeks lived in a murky and muddy world, devoid of color, mostly black and white and metallic, with occasional flashes of red or yellow. Gladstone thought this was perhaps something unique to ...


4

The information in the video is incomplete, outdated, and the cited journal is not popular among neuroscientists (every publication in "Cognitive Neurodynamics" gets cited close to 2 times per year. The impact factor is 1.828 according to the publisher: https://link.springer.com/journal/11571). The first citation of the quote has only been cited 7 times. The ...


3

According to this letter addressed to Mr. Howard Stephen Berg from Cyd Smith, the Assistant director of Guinness Book of World Records (1990): Dear Mr. Berg: We have accepted your speed reading claim for the inclusion in the 1990 edition of the GUINNESS BOOK OF WORLD RECORDS but we are unable to use any of your photographs. Also regarding the ...


3

Lapis lazuli is a blue semi-precious stone that was mined in Mesopotamia in ancient times as early as the 7th millenium BC, see http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=P_Ixuott4doC&pg=PA86&dq=Lapis+lazuli+++mines+in+the+Badakhshan&hl=en&ei=sW6_TvWKBIKr8AOTn623BA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&sqi=2&ved=...


3

This phenomenon is just the result of the Agent detection. I asked two similar questions on cogsci.stackexchange which interested people might like to read: Why-is-it-common-for-people-to-default-to-a-single-causal-source-to-explain-new I think it is mostly a result of "hyperactive agency detection"; this results in "single-cause" reasoning as part of ...


1

I don't like to give simple direct answers, mainly because I don't think I have enough certainty to do so, but also because I prefer to offer the data that I had analyzed and then see if the other person came up with a similar conclusion. I think the core of this tendency to anthropomorphize odd shapes of materials is grounded on the making of false-...


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