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96

What the writings by Sullins say Invisible Victims: Delayed Onset Depression among Adults with Same-Sex Parents is available online: Retrospective questions at Waves III and IV asked about adult mistreatment during childhood, including whether a parent or caregiver had “slapped, hit or kicked you,” said “things that hurt your feelings or made you feel you ...


64

A 2011 literature review looked at the problem as it related to one particular condition: Difficulties in diagnosing pulmonary embolism in the obese patient: A literature review. They conclude that there is a problem - not only are many CT scanners unable to handle morbidly obese patients (although this is improving), there are no guidelines for when this ...


47

No, this is not quite true. The factoid is based on a real, peer-reviewed scientific study, that is relatively new. Probability of an Obese Person Attaining Normal Body Weight: Cohort Study Using Electronic Health Records, American Journal of Public Health, September 2015, Vol 105, No. 9, doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2015.302773 They based their evidence on looking ...


14

Question: "Does the evidence support a strong causal relationship between (specifically) fructose consumption and obesity?" My answer: NO. Consideration 1: This question has arisen because of "simultaneous" increase of use of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and obesity in the United States. Consideration 2: There has been some debate if fructose increases ...


13

Summary: Based on current research, there is evidence from several studies that higher tax on drinks with high sugar content might reduce sugar consumption. However, researchers feel that the levied sugar taxes might only reduce the average sugar consumption globally by a small amount. But Jack Winkler, emeritus professor of nutrition policy at London ...


12

Yes, there are studies where monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used to induce obesity in rodents, but using this fact as an anti-MSG argument is very questionable. Example of papers using rodent models of MSG-induced obesity The induction of obesity in rodents by means of monosodium glutamate. - Bunyan et al., Br J Nutr. 1976 or The monosodium glutamate (...


11

tl;dr, No. The effect is real and many lines of inquiry for the underlying causality have been proposed since the initial claim from the question. Since the causes and effects of both obesity and social webs are so complex, no definitive model of causality has been established since. The central claim holds up very well. As an observation. The ...


10

There is anecdotal evidence to support the notion that some obese patients might have been referred to a zoo. Here is a recent NY Times article that explores the standard of care obese patients are receiving. From the article: When an obese patient cannot fit in a scanner, doctors may just give up. Some use X-rays to scan, hoping for the best. Others ...


9

All fats do not have the same effect on the body when ingested even though they possess a similar chemical structure. All fats have a similar chemical structure: a chain of carbon atoms bonded to hydrogen atoms. What makes one fat different from another is the length and shape of the carbon chain and the number of hydrogen atoms connected to the carbon ...


8

It's not completely clear from your question whether you want to know if obesity causes illnesses, or you want to know if diet causes illnesses even after controlling for obesity. I'm going to assume you are mainly concerned with whether obesity has a causal relationship to illnesses, or is just correlated with them. This question has been addressed by the ...


7

Obesity is influenced by several factors such as behavioral traits, social-environment and genetics and one of the social microenvironmental influences on obesity promoting behaviors is social eating. Socially derived inhibitory norms can account for either increased or decreased intake in the presence of others, depending on how much the others eat and the ...


7

Diet soda refers to a calorie-free carbonated beverage sweetened by artificial sweeteners. The current evidence does not provide a proof that diet soda causes weight gain, but the main points are: Overweight individuals may drink diet soda to prevent further weight gain, but they still gain weight because they do not decrease calorie intake from foods, ...


7

Diet soda intake is associated with long-term increases in waist circumference in a biethnic cohort of older adults is the journal article they're citing. The article you quoted is slightly incorrect in that the increase in waist circumference is what triples. Adjusted for initial WC, demographic characteristics, physical activity, diabetes mellitus, and ...


5

It looks like for young people (20's) both height and adiposity hover around .80. But as people get older genetic factors become less important for adiposity but remain somewhat stable (around .80) for height. A Twin Study of Human Obesity http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=359582 Height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) were assessed in ...


5

According to The Healthcare Costs of Obesity, copyright Robert Wood Johnson Foundation: •Obese adults spend 42 percent more on direct healthcare costs than adults who are a healthy weight. [reference 5] •Per capita healthcare costs for severely or morbidly obese adults (BMI >40) are 81 percent higher than for healthy weight adults.[reference 6] Where ...


4

You have to be very careful reading studies as shown - many of them conflate the nuclear family with everything other than the nuclear family, including single parents, and make the conclusion that the nuclear family is the only way forward. Outlined very well in Slate. There is a link in that article that I can't add to The New Republic outlining these ...


4

Yes. As long as the diet soda is still a sweetened beverage containing artificial (ie non-caloric) sweetener, then they do help make people fat. Regardless of age. That is, as a tendency: eat more. And this is really old news. Artificial sweeteners are for a long time now used to fattened pigs and cattle. The research there is now just how to optimise its ...


3

In 2003 a review of the risks of body piercing was produced by a European Commission Joint Research Centre. Risks and Health Effects from Tattoos, Body Piercing and Related Practices While they reviewed the literature, and list a number of health risks involved with body-piercings, there is no mention of fat, obesity or weight-gain. I conclude this is "...


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