124

The numbers on the chart seem to be close for the most part, although there are other events that match the criteria of this image that should be included. We are going to assume, for the sake of this question, that the criteria that the creator of this image used was Either deaths of American Citizens, or deaths on American soil - this is to prevent ...


94

Yes, that device is used for that purpose, but the claim is somewhat misleading, including about its frequency of use. The device is called an "A/V Closure". A/V stands for Anus/Vagina. Here are some examples for sale. The A/V closure is used to prevent leaking from the anus in cadavers. Kari the Mortician explains that there may be leaks if there ...


85

It appears that the study by Colleen Huber, NMD, a Naturopathic Medical Doctor, cited in the OP is incomplete, and was subsequently withdrawn on 13 August, 2020. The NYT article, 13 August 2020, appears to sharply contradict the doctor's study and conclusions. The True Coronavirus Toll in the U.S. Has Already Surpassed 200,000 Across the United States, at ...


52

No. Sanity check: The CDC has provisional weekly death data for 2019 and 2020 available here: https://data.cdc.gov/NCHS/Weekly-Counts-of-Deaths-by-State-and-Select-Causes/muzy-jte6. The average number of deaths per week in July 2019 was ~52,000. The average number of deaths per week in July 2020 was ~54,500. These figures suggest that the weekly mortality ...


38

The larger context of Birx's quote is:: There are other countries that if you had a preexisting condition and let's say the virus caused you to go to the ICU and then have a heart or kidney problem some countries are recording as a heart issue or a kidney issue and not a COVID-19 death. Right now we are still recording it and we will I mean the great thing ...


25

No, but it's close, ranking between #4 and #6 depending on how you count. As of August 20, 2020, the US death toll from COVID-19 is roughly 175,000 (source: the New York Times, the CDC, and Worldometers all agree to within about 2%). The death toll started rising in late March, for a duration of slightly over five months, not the four months mentioned in ...


23

According to the CDC The 1918 flu pandemic virus kills an estimated 195,000 Americans during October alone. According to the data collected by Johns Hopkins, Covid-19 has killed 173,626 people in the US in total (as of 20 August 2020).* The Spanish flu therefore killed more Americans in the span of one month (October 1918) than Covid-19 has killed in total,...


21

There is actually a fairly standard statistical method of deriving event death numbers, when official sources aren't trusted: You check the total mortality during the event, and compare it to expected mortality for that period (based on historical data). This technique, sometimes called "mortality displacement", or "excess mortality", is a tool commonly used ...


19

Meme is not considering previous flu pandemics, so that is very selective. Consider this Wikipedia quote: In the United States, ~292,000 deaths were reported between September–December 1918, compared to ~26,000 during the same time period in 1915 That gives us over 2000 dead per day, even in unlikely case deaths were extremely evenly distributed. This is ...


19

See Provisional Death Counts for Coronavirus Disease which is a more-official but more delayed count of COVID-19 deaths by the US National Center for Health Statistics. Here, the standard is "Deaths with confirmed or presumed COVID-19, coded to ICD–10 code U07.1". There is also an explanation: When a death occurs, a certifier (e.g. physician, ...


16

Birx said that (CSPAN transcript timestamp 00:55:06), in the USA, if someone is hospitalised because of Covid-19 and dies in hospital from a pre-existing health condition - e.g. with the heart or kidney - it is recorded as a Covid-19 death. While some other countries would record the death was due to the heart or kidney problem, not Covid-19. Therefore ...


14

For what's worth it, the author of the meme was interviewed by CNET, which quoted & paraphraphrased these bits about how the listicle was created: "The stark differences between American society's reaction to Pearl Harbor, 9/11 and this pandemic hit me so strongly," she said, also giving credit to a similar graphic she saw. She used the best ...


13

It looks like they are trying to push a narrative just as you suspect. If you look at the data they provide from the CDC it quickly becomes clear that the death rate is not steady all year long and it peaks in winter and declines to the lowest in summer. Because of this it is clear to see that doing a straight average is not a fair comparision. https://www....


9

Yes, and probably more. These numbers come from netizens finding online news articles about murdered trans people, and creating a database: the Trans Murder Monitoring project. Indeed, each case is documented with a link to the source. They highlight the caveats thusly: The collected data show only those cases which have been reported. There is no data ...


7

According to Bacteriophage Distributions and Temporal Variability in the Ocean’s Interior mBio Nov/Dec 2017 Volume 8, e01903-17: Phages have been shown to kill hosts at rates of up to 20 to 40% of the total population per day, potentially strongly impacting bacterioplankton populations (7,8). Where reference 7 is Ecology of prokaryotic viruses. FEMS ...


5

Another source claims that: It is believed that, in 525 B.C., 50,000 soldiers of a Persian Army perished in the Thar Desert in the face of a giant sandstorm, and their compelling remains were discovered by archaeologists only a few years ago in the Middle Eastern deserts. Even counting drowning in sand, the lost army of Persian King Cambyses II has ...


4

The raw data are available from the Spain MOMO site at the "Datos" tab. The link labeled "aquí" here will give you a CSV file of deaths per date, either National or by region, starting 2018-12-31. If I have done the calculations correctly, the current total for all-cause deaths in 2020 is 465,535. I suggest the original question is based ...


4

The particular claim being made of "deadliest days in American history" is not supported by the data provided. Aside from the significant missing events listed in DenisS' answer, what the graphic shows and what the claim states are two different things. The graphic shows deaths caused by a single cause on a particular single day. It does not show ...


4

India does not have the lowest reported number of deaths per million: According to the same source the OP linked to, when sorting by population China: population: 1,439,323,776 total deaths: 4,634 deaths per 1M pop: 3 India: population: 1,385,752,793 total deaths:139,473 deaths per 1M pop: 101 USA: population: 331,828,037 total deaths: 283,072 deaths per 1M ...


4

Another useful document has turned up in tansy's answer (this concerns NVSS death coding), but I think the most relevant part from it is: Will COVID-19 be the underlying cause? The underlying cause depends upon what and where conditions are reported on the death certificate. However, the rules for coding and selection of the underlying cause of death are ...


3

Yes, they do. Let me explain by quoting Q and A on death certificates published by the CDC on March 24 (it's a document from an official goverment site): What happens if the terms reported on the death certificate indicate uncertainty? If the death certificate reports terms such as “probable COVID-19” or “likely COVID-19,” these terms would be ...


3

The reference given is a bit vague. There is an organisation at the University of Washington called the IHME The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) is an independent population health research center at UW Medicine, part of the University of Washington, that provides rigorous and comparable measurement of the world's most important health ...


3

Hesitant to answer this given the preliminary nature of the knowledge, but there is one paper that proposed to use the Diamond Princess (since it's a "finished" natural experiment) as a proxy to calibrate the CFR (case fatality ratio) in other populations/countries. One needs to be careful to adjust for the different age-structure of populations/...


2

The precise question being asked here is not that clear to me, but here is a brief and accessible article from The Lancet a few weeks ago which outlined the challenges of calculating COVID-19s general CFR (Case Fatality Rate). It concludes: Although highly transmissible, the CFR of COVID-19 appears to be lower than that of SARS (9.5%) and Middle East ...


2

In the USA, a Covid19 death must be verified via testing or autopsy, which is standard for any death, before the NCHS adds the death to the official count. In the case of Covid19, there is a new death code of U07.2 which allows for a death to be temporarily coded as a possible Covid19 death. If the death is coded U07.2, that death IS NOT included in the ...


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