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148

Yes, they survived the blast. No, their survival was not unexplainable. The Jesuits are at two locations: They reside at Novitiate of the Society of Jesus in Nagatsuke two kilometers from the edge of the city (and 3 kilometers from the epicenter of the blast), but at the time of the explosion some are at Central Mission and Parish House closer to ground ...


66

No, that is a New Zealand pohutukawa (Metrosideros excels) and it blooms for Christmas, not Easter. Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrosideros_excelsa http://www.doc.govt.nz/nature/native-plants/pohutukawa/


54

There were 4 priests at the closest location to ground zero, but they were 1,400 yards from ground zero according to John Hersey's 1946 book Hiroshima . Other people (non-priests) survived being as close as 300 yards from ground zero. (These distances are horizontal components only, with the bomb detonating at a height of 650 yards, so no one on the ground ...


49

No. This flower is the flower of the Metrosideros excelsa, the tree is also called pōhutukawa tree and New Zealand Christmas tree. According to its wikipedia page the tree: The tree flowers from November to January with a peak in mid to late December (the Southern Hemisphere summer), with brilliant crimson flowers covering the tree, hence the nickname ...


30

"The spontaneous remission rate of all cancers, lumped together, is estimated to be something between one in ten thousand and one in a hundred thousand. If no more than 5 percent of those who come to Lourdes were there to treat their cancers, there should have been something between 50 and 500 'miraculous' cures of cancer alone. Since only three ...


22

Did this event happen? According to the Vatican it did: Pope Benedict XVI has formally approved a miracle attributed to his late predecessor, paving the way to John Paul II's beatification on 1 May. The Vatican credits him with the miraculous cure of a nun said to have had Parkinson's Disease. So an actual event did happen, with a real person....


17

The Dracaena cinnabari (Socotra dragon tree or dragon blood tree) is well known for having a distinct red sap or resin and there are a number of other plants that also exhibit similar "Dragons's Blood". As noted in the Wikipedia article on Dragon's Blood: The dragon's blood known to the ancient Romans was mostly collected from D. cinnabari, and is ...


14

Short answer: There is a liquid that does the congeal and liquefy trick, but it's probably not blood. Long answer: First of all, the Catholic Church has not made an official stance on this event. The wikipedia page on this says so, as well as an investigation by The Italian Committee for the Investigation of the Paranormal. While the Catholic Church ...


11

The Catholic Church approved the beatification of the late Pope John Paul II after a Catholic nun, Marie Simon-Pierre, reported being cured of Parkinson's disease after praying to John Paul II. Wikipedia reports that the validity of the beatification has been criticised on a number of grounds, including a suggestion that the unusual rapidity with which it ...


2

The question is intrinsically acceding to the deceit of the system: it is questioning one specific "miracle" rather than the concept of "miracle" itself. If you view the broader concept itself you better understand where miracles come form. Because there's a fairly easy explanation for pretty much any (medical) miracle: survivorship bias and cherry picking. ...


1

First of all, a correction of one of the sources, Mystagogy. There was no rigor mortis of the elder's body. His mouth simply slagged open and they could not get it to remain closed without it being tied. Though it is not particularly well-written, the Diakonima account at the link is correct. Also Elder Joseph was never the Abbot of Vatopaidi. He was the ...


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