217

Short answer: No. I laughed when I first read this claim, but researching this, with the added help of some friends, was quite a journey. My first interpretation was that someone had decided that bones contained calcium carbonate, that lemon juice contains citric acid, that acid etches away at calcium carbonate, so clearly drinking lemon juice would "...


216

DO NOT DRINK BLEACH! Chlorine dioxide is a type of bleach. The Blue Ridge Poisoning Center at University of Virginia Health put out a specific warning not to drink bleach. There is a lot of confusing, incomplete, and just plain inaccurate information circulating about how to prevent the COVID-19 virus (“coronavirus”) from spreading. Some advice measures ...


185

A series of comments on the article's PubPeer appears to entirely invalidate the paper's conclusion; the paper commits several classic errors which have been previously discussed on skeptics.se. First is misuse of adverse event databases, exactly as discussed here. These sorts of adverse event databases do not establish causality; it is simply a list of all ...


129

Update (7/9/21): The paper was retracted on July 2, 2021. The retraction cited the same concern that not all deaths reported to national government systems are necessarily caused by the vaccine, while the paper incorrectly assumed that all such reported deaths were caused by the vaccine. Do COVID-19 vaccines cause 2 deaths for every 3 deaths they prevent? ...


92

Almost all studies in this arena are correlative-based and not causation-based, so that I would take them all with a grain of salt. I would all suggest that Weiler and Thomas (2020) omit some important data, such as those that die from the disease from which they could have been vaccinated, and these are important data points. You raise some good points as ...


78

WP:Copper toxicity#EPA cancer data: The EPA lists no evidence for human cancer incidence connected with copper, and lists animal evidence linking copper to cancer as "inadequate". There is no information I could find on brass being considered carcinogenic. Brass fittings are sometimes coated with cadmium. Cadmium is itself toxic and many ...


74

The only way to settle this is to find and cite a study or survey that supports or refutes the claim that "the majority of doctors in the USA support the use of hydroxychloroquine against COVID 19." I found an article "USA Today" from 18 June, 2020 which quotes a survey that (among other things) asked doctors around the world which ...


74

You can just buy adrenochrome, e.g. here from Sigma-Aldrich. It's somewhat expensive for a relatively simple chemical, but not as expensive as it would have to be if the only way to acquire it would be by extracting it from the blood of frightened humans. It can be synthesized by oxidizing epinephrine (also known as adrenaline), which is available pretty ...


54

No. According to the chapter "Carbohydrate Metabolism in the Colon" in Human Colonic Bacteria (1995) : The large intestine contains about 220 g wet weight of contents (range circa 60–900 g), 35 g dry weight Authors of the chapter are Philip D. Marsh, Ph.D. and Michael J. Hudson, B.Sc. Department of Pathogenicity PHLS Centre for Applied ...


47

The story appears to be mostly true. It was told by the niece of one of the men who participated in the early experiments. Note that these experiments were before there was even an experimental vaccine. They are still working on getting samples of the rabies virus. Any exposure to the rabies virus would have been a death sentence for the exposed person. ...


43

David Gorski has some (updated) comments about the methodology of the study such as: The authors claim that RIOV “reflects the total number of billed office visits per condition per group, reflecting the total disease burden on the group and the population that it represents,” but no good analysis or references are provided to show that RIOV does, in fact, ...


38

Western world Indeed, according to the Independent there is a crisis regarding fertility rates. But rather interestingly the same trend has not been observed in other parts of the world such as South America, Africa, Asia, though admittedly fewer studies have been carried out in those areas. Also, it is indeed true that one of the suspected factors, along ...


37

There is no perfect study yet, but the best evidence we have says HCQ doesn't work There are well-known rules for judging the quality of evidence in clinical studies. Since discussion this highly charged question seems to frequently consist of selective citation of studies producing the results some advocated of HCQ want to see, it is worth reviewing those ...


36

Those Ads were popular on TV years ago. They all claim some permanent build-up of "extra poop" which only a cleanse can remove. I found a lovely 2018 quote from a skeptic medical office of McGill University from the head, a Chemistry instructor. The lead-up to it is quite funny and mentions earlier Ads. This part makes one embarrassed to have even ...


27

It is worth noting that almost all of the conditions listed in the chart, unless they are unusually severe, do not need professional medical intervention. Skin rashes, coughs, minor to moderate asthma, many eye and ear infections etc. either go away on their own, can be treated with over-the-counter medicine or, if they become chronic, can be manged with ...


22

It may be worth adding that the WHO sets a somewhat higher threshold for toxicity than the EPA, for chlorine dioxide in water, namely 2mg/L. Anyhow, the problem is that there don't seem to be even animal studies finding that at non-toxic levels (for the host) chlorine dioxide helps with an already established viral infection. So basically there's zero ...


21

The damage wasn't nearly as bad as the articles would make it appear, and the healing process was, according to one hand surgeon, completely normal. The story was picked up by BBC, CBS News, and Popular Science, among other organizations. However, none of these articles shared pictures of the before and after. The Guardian (NSFW) also picked up the story in ...


20

Short answer: Most certainly no, but as so often, it's impossible to prove a negative. The Cultural Meaning of the Brain There are many descriptions of how the brain was discarded during mummification, while other organs like the heart, lungs, liver and intestines where carefully embalmed and kept in special vessels. However, mummification processes changed ...


20

There is actual scientific evidence for asymptomatic Sars cov 2 transmission. I found about 50 scientific publications in the peer-reviewed literature that clarify this information (in a 10-minute search), so there is clearly some evidence which is much more than none. Below are three of them with their conclusions quoted: Our study confirms asymptomatic ...


19

Well, there's a huge middle ground between "not present in any form" and "pandemic". Indeed, the vast majority of infectious diseases are somewhere in this middle ground, e.g. influenza, hepatitis, various sexually transmitted infections: people regularly get infected, and there may be significant morbidity and mortality, but not at a ...


17

A double-blind, randomized, controlled trial was just published today in NEJM: A Randomized Trial of Hydroxychloroquine as Postexposure Prophylaxis for Covid-19. This is a trial where Hydroxychloroquine was given very early, just as Risch demands in the article you quote. The results were negative: After high-risk or moderate-risk exposure to Covid-19, ...


17

That's an interesting question! So I will first explain the exact mechanism of Xylitol in our oral cavity. Xylitol, is a naturally occurring five-carbon sugar polyol, a white crystalline carbohydrate. Now the most significant contributor or the pioneer bacteria for dental caries (which further leads to tooth decay) is Streptococcus Mutans. Xylitol reduces ...


17

It is essentially irrelevant whether the virus was purified, and the reason it wasn't in the cases that the Youtube video mentioned is that it simply was not necessary or useful to add a purification step there. I'll quote a pagagraph from a random electron microscopy paper about SARS-CoV2 I found here: To avoid artefacts associated with virus concentration ...


14

Yes, Nancy Pelosi said this, and C-SPAN has the video: Speaker Pelosi on Coronavirus Economic Aid Package. You can navigate to the correct part by clicking on the text in the automatically-generated transcript (though note it was not edited and has mistakes like "crockery" when she really said "quackery"). Pelosi already received the ...


14

TL;DR summary: There are indeed varying definitions of a pandemic; some emphasize (or even require) human-to-human transmission and some don't. It's difficult to apply a definition that emphasizes that human-to-human aspect to a vector-borne disease like Lyme disease. The WHO in particular has a more detailed, technical definition of an influenza pandemic, ...


14

The whole you-didn't-image-this-in-a-highly-purified-sample is a red herring with regard to determining whether a (suspected) virus is a "a brand new viral pathogen" or not. Nobody does that kind of novelty determination based on imaging the virus... simply because lots of viruses look alike even under electron microscopy. Imaging is not a useful ...


14

As formulated: yes. But it's more complicated. Homeopaths did not invent this principle. They interpret it in a peculiar and very far reaching way. First, we should note that 'Hippokrates' is somewhat elusive as a person or 'writer', since the writings we categorize in the corpus hippocraticum are a large collection of texts spanning a timeframe exceeding ...


13

First off - I am not professionally involved with science, nor medicine. But I heard the same statement, that "flu vaccine make us more vulnerable to COVID-19" and was also curious. Here are the results of my research. Also - there is a conclusion in the end if you don't want to read the whole post. Research papers that are saying flu vaccine make ...


13

Summary: There is no evidence that ingesting Chlorine Dioxide cures or protects from COVID-19, but the idea is not a priori as patently absurd as it may seem at first glance. Molecular Chlorine and some chlorine compounds like sodium hypochlorite or chlorine dioxide are known to be effective disinfectants outside of the body. Chlorine dioxide, a water ...


12

This claim seems to have originated from a profound misunderstanding of the word "quantified", perhaps an unfortunate consequence of the technical shorthand that scientists like to use. The culture and isolation of SARS-CoV-2 was successful from the very first patient studied[q1] and is trivial and done all over the globe; here is just one of many ...


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