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184

According to the US CDC: People who smoke cigarettes are 15 to 30 times more likely to get lung cancer or die from lung cancer than people who do not smoke According to Carcinogenicity of consumption of red and processed meat (Lancet 2015) citing to Red and Processed Meat and Colorectal Cancer Incidence: Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies (2011): ...


120

The cartoon seems to originate from Resources Spent on Consumption of Animals (citing to a video from Bite Size Vegan) which gives slightly more detail: 1 lb of beef = 55 square feet of forest (45-55 trees) One year using NO paper saves 8.51 trees vs. foregoing 1 lb of beef, which saves 45-55 trees One year eating no beef saves 3,432 trees So the ...


77

Does the claim “processed meat causes as much cancer as smoking in relative terms” hold up to scrutiny? No, it does not. The WHO did indeed classify processed meat as carcinogenic to humans. Going to the source, http://www.who.int/features/qa/cancer-red-meat/en/, 9. Processed meat was classified as carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). Tobacco smoking and ...


30

I messaged the creator of the video, asking: In one of your videos you write "The FDA estimates that 93% of meat worker marriages are in shambles". is that just a joke or do you have a source for this? Today he replied to me. I quote his reply in full: Combine this with the facts that the happiness of a relationship is pretty difficult to quantify, and ...


27

Yes, it is truth. This is well known in rural enviorements, pigs is a clear example of this. The reason are stated in this study by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United nations: The energy required for muscle activity in the live animal is obtained from sugars (glycogen) in the muscle. In the healthy and well-rested animal, the glycogen ...


26

The claim really originates from 1986, and over the years has been stripped down to a factoid, to fulfill Bradbury's prophecy "Films and radios, magazines, books leveled down to a sort of pastepudding norm". It started from the editorial Our steak in the jungle BioScience (November, 1986), page 642 on the effect of Central American beef production ...


12

The closest thing anyone has ever produced to proof that monkeys are eaten alive is this 1998 article in Apple Daily, a popular Hong Kong newspaper. It shows an unconscious monkey about to be decapitated, and then a photo of the brains, clearly from the same meal: However, there is a crucial thing missing here: the monkey was "alive" (all meat is alive ...


11

Given that millions of hogs are slaughtered in the United States every month, it is entirely possible that workers do observe pigs being scalded alive. However, to the extent that USDA regulations are effectively enforced, pigs that are killed in this way should not be entering the food supply. This presumably motivates slaughterhouses to prevent it from ...


9

Calcium may inhibit iron absorption, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's "unhealthy", just that if you're eating red meat to contribute to your body's iron reserves, and drinking milk to achieve the same thing with calcium, it may be best not to have them in the same meal.


8

The claims, like "meat, dairy, and eggs trigger an inflammatory reaction inside the body" arise from the studies in which they observed increased blood levels of "inflammatory markers," like C-reactive protein (CRP), in individuals on different diets. For example, in one study Dietary Red and Processed Meat Intake and Markers of Adiposity and Inflammation (J ...


8

No. Vegetarianism is not associated with more healthful sleep patterns, per se. Lowering the intake of protein hurts sleep quality. Moreover, the consumption of certain types of foods which impact the availability of tryptophan as well as the synthesis of serotonin and melatonin may aid in promoting sleep. But reducing fat and salt intake will improve ...


6

Yes, it would be a major contribution! (but it would not be sufficient) The Union of Concerned Scientists wrote a report called Solutions for deforestation-free meat. The report is mostly about inefficiencies of existing food production; e.g. only 20% of the worlds agricultural land is used for crops for direct human consumption, and 80% of the agricultural ...


5

In the book "Who Needs a Road?: The Story of the Longest and Last Motor Journey Around the World by Harold Stephens and Albert Podell" the authors eats monkey brain in a restaurant in Hong Kong in 1966. They have the special table described above and the top of the skull is cut of with a cleaver. In some situations you have no choice but to eat whatever ...


5

What about study in more recent years? This study published in the year 2000 says that the vegans have 13% higher testosterone concentration than meat eaters and 8% more than vegetarians. Hormones and diet: low insulin-like growth factor-I but normal bioavailable androgens in vegan men Summary Mean serum insulin-like growth factor-I was 9% lower in 233 ...


4

Yes, it does increase the risk for chronic diseases including cardiovascular diseases. Red meat consumption is associated with an increased risk of total, cardiovascular disease, and cancer mortality. Substitution of other healthy protein sources for red meat is associated with a lower mortality risk. Source: Pan A, Sun Q, Bernstein AM, Schulze MB, ...


3

Tl;dr, artificially, yes. Farm animal lifespans have decreased. Naturally? I doubt it. The average lifespan of a cow is usually 15-20 years (Cow Longevity Conference, 2013), though a website that claims to be a farming sanctuary claims that cows can live for over 20 years. From what I've read, an herbivore/carnivore lifestyle doesn't really affect lifespan. ...


3

There is a common misconception that Halal meat is "healthier" than non-Halal meat, because it is often confused with it's parent, Kosher. The practice of Halal, like a large number of Islamic practices, was born from Judaism, specifically Kosher. However, many of the restrictions of Kosher were not included in Halal, including the restrictions that add ...


3

The question in the title differs from the question in the text. The answer to the title question is "Yes": It is certainly part of traditional cuisine some places in the world, if perhaps exceedingly rare or luxurious. Example: The man han quan xi (or the Manchu-Han Full Course), indulged in by Qing Emperors, consisted of such treats as: Camel's Hump, ...


3

Question: Does red meat increase the risk of heart disease? My answer: Consumption of red meat was associated with increased risk of heart disease in some, but not all, studies, which suggests that some common red meat ingredient, like sodium or other preservatives, rather than red meat by itself may be the actual risk factor. http://circheartfailure....


2

A older study [1] suggests that this is true in younger chicken. A relevant excerpt: During the years 1994–2000 mean arsenic concentrations in young chickens ranged from 0.33 to 0.43ppm, and the mean for the entire period was 0.39 ppm (Figure1). During the same period, the mean values for mature chickens, turkeys, hogs, and all other species was between 0....


1

This meta-analysis showed that whey protein supplementation can actually reduce markers of inflammation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4344580/ ABSTRACT Whey supplementation is beneficial for human health, possibly by reducing the circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) level, a sensitive marker of inflammation. Thus, a meta-analysis ...


1

It's all supply and demand really. If the demand is reduced, prices will fall in order for the excessive stock to be reduced. In the long term though prices can not fall lower than the cost of raising the cattle. Farms with higher cost will be priced out of the market and will stop raising cattle. This is all theoretical though. What is happening in the ...


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