30

Apparently not In The American West: A New Interpretive History by Robert V. Hine, John Mack Faragher, they quote the annual homicide rate of Dodge City (one of the towns mentioned by Ridley) as 50 per 100,000 people. That would make it higher than any modern day US city except New Orleans and Detroit. The book Homicide: A Sociological Explanation by ...


28

In addition to Articuno's answer (+1): Lets look at the first reason Ridley gives for RCP8.5 not being realistic: "For a start, this is a world of “continuously increasing global population” so that there are 12 billion on the planet. This is more than a billion more than the United Nations expects, and flies in the face of the fact that the world ...


26

Your answer is pretty much entirely contained in the IPCC's Fourth Assesment Report, section 1.3.6.2 (Forestry), except for the part about the Sahel in Africa. It's pretty short and concise, so I recommend reading it for yourself. Some quotes, with my emphasis: Thus, the overall trend towards longer growing seasons is consistent with an increase in the ‘...


6

Is there any evidence that it was education that drove countries to prosperity, or vice versa? Alison Wolf examined the data in exhaustive detail in her book Does Education Matter?, and concluded that the answer is a surprising ‘no’. The above claim is false. The effect of higher education on GDP has been measured in this study comparing Australia, Austria, ...


3

Yes, the world is literally getting greener, largely thanks to anthropogenically-elevated atmospheric CO2 levels. Is the world getting greener? Here's a map: Source: Greening Earth: Spatial patterns, by Prof. Ranga B. Myneni, Boston U. (2015) This excerpt is from a 2009 National Geographic article about how even the "Sahara" desert (really the Sahel)...


3

There is one important assumption in RCP8.5 that makes it unrealistic. Quoting RCP 8.5—A scenario of comparatively high greenhouse gas emissions Climatic Change (2011) 109: 33: Coal use in particular increases almost 10 fold by 2100 Fig. 5 Development of global primary energy supply in RCP8.5 (left-hand panel) and global primary energy supply in 2100 in ...


2

Matt Ridley's claim In 2003, the OECD published a paper on ‘sources of growth in OECD countries’ between 1971 and 1998, finding to its explicit surprise that whereas privately funded research and development stimulated economic growth, publicly funded research had no economic impact whatsoever. is completely false. You can read the paper conclusions ...


2

Ridley is cherry-picking to an enormous extent, such that even if his statements are technically true they are without meaning. Analysis of fibrous materials using X-ray crystallography did indeed contribute to the study of DNA structure, and the techniques may well have been used in the wool industry. However those studies themselves were dependent on ...


1

It's impossible to prove or disprove the assertion that something is "typical", but there's much evidence that both effects occur (that science and tech benefit each other). There are many examples of science benefiting technology but the quintessetial example could be that a scientist, Sir Tim Barners-Lee invented the web while working on basic science at ...


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