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19

Scholarly papers which mention the (geographical) mosquito line include: Climate change and biodiversity T. Lovejoy In the Hawaiian islands, the surviving species of the great Hawaiian Honeycreeper evolutionary radiation survive only above a certain altitude – the ‘mosquito line’ – above which the introduced mosquito that transmits an introduced bird ...


16

I agree with Larry at the crucial parts of the article. To explain a bit: The WHO is nowhere near hiding Artemisia for anti-malaria medication. In fact, four drugs prepared from the plant are on their list of essential medicines. But: these are to be used in drug combinations. What the WHO is very much concerned about is drug resistance, which is also ...


16

The Red Cross itself denies that the video is accurate. Their statement categorically denies that they were involved in any clinical trials for Malaria. You can find the following statement on the website of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC): IFRC strongly dissociates from the claim of a ‘miracle’ solution to ...


14

According to the World Health Organization: More than two thirds (70%) of all malaria deaths occur in this age group. In 2015, about 305,000 African children died before their fifth birthdays. This data was used by an African organization africacheck.org when trying to estimate the number of malaria deaths in children under 5 in Africa: Then, using a ...


11

Mosquitoes, like other animals, have ranges and if you draw a line around these ranges you have a "mosquito line". The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have a map of the ranges of the 30-40 species from the genus Anopheles which can carry malaria. A map of all 3500 mosquito species would cover a wider area. It is possible to distinguish ...


10

Although thought-provoking, the article doesn't claim either that the tea "will prevent malaria" or that the WHO is "trying to hide" it. Rather it says: [A] randomized controlled trial on this farm showed that workers who drank it regularly reduced their risk of suffering from multiple episodes of malaria by one-third. and [M]alaria experts worry ...


5

There are two questions. One is whether it's possible to diagnose malaria with a non-invasive device, and two whether that device could involve a smartphone with software. It's clearly possible to non-invasively diagnose cerebral malaria by examining the retina using either direct or indirect ophthalmoscopy [1] A retinopathy consisting of two unique ...


5

No. In the 2002 paper, Evolutionary and Historical Aspects of the Burden of Malaria [DOI: 10.1128/CMR.15.4.564–594.2002] the authors look at the history of malaria all the way back to pre-agricultural times. They explain how bad malaria was at its worst point: At some time during the 19th century, malaria reached its global limits. In absolute numbers ...


2

I can find no actual calculation to back up this claim. In addition to those already given in OP's question, we have these other quotes. Malaria may have killed half of all the people that ever lived (2002 Nature news article). it is believed to be responsible for roughly half of all human deaths dating back to the dawn of civilization. (2005 ...


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