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31

It is common knowledge that sugar will help microorganism growth (that's why, for instance, when you rehydrate freeze-dried yeast you add a pinch of sugar to help it restart its activity). Too much sugar (or any other solute, really), however, is not good for microbial growth. One parameter that is usually taken into account is the water activity. Quoting ...


30

Let me start off with my conclusion as a chemist... I absolutely don't believe that heating honey in hot water would make the liquid indigestible or toxic. The claim The webpages cited by the OP, and many others, claim that heating honey in water makes it "unsafe" (I'm lumping indigestible and toxic into one category). Without any reference to some ...


20

Honey can go bad Osmophilic organisms are microorganisms adapted to environments with high osmotic pressures, such as high sugar concentrations. [...] Osmophile yeasts are important because they cause spoilage in the sugar and sweet goods industry, with products such as fruit juices, fruit juice concentrates, liquid sugars (such as golden syrup), ...


19

This is a difficult question to directly answer, for a number of reasons. Some people tried to address it in previous answers (since deleted) by pointing out that honey and lemon are not alkaline. Unfortunately, that is undermined by proponents of alkaline diets simply shifting the definition of alkaline and pH around to use misleading, non-standard ...


18

In short, yes. Picking one of the first recent publications to come up in my search for "honey wound healing", I give you Honey and Wound Healing: An Update (DOI 10.1007/s40257-016-0247-8), which "outlines publications regarding honey and wound healing that have been published between June 2010 and August 2016". The "key points" listed in the electronic ...


11

The article author of the article that you linked to wrote an earlier article in 1994 where he measured the ethanol content of unspoiled honey. This article of Journal of Agricultural Food Chem from 1994 gives the natural ethanol content of honey as 27.9mg/kg.


6

It's important to begin by discussing the mechanism that drives tooth decay: Chapter 99 – Microbiology of Dental Decay and Periodontal Disease. Loesche. Medical Microbiology. 1996. Dental decay is due to the irreversible solubilization of tooth mineral by acid produced by certain bacteria that adhere to the tooth surface in bacterial communities ...


5

Evidence for it seems to be lacking. This is the closest I've found to an exploration of the sources and the most likely source for the claim is the 1907 account of explorer Theodore Davis regarding the Tomb of Yuya and Tjuyu (emphasis mine): From the neck of one of the vases hung shreds of mummy-cloth which had originally covered the mouth of the vase. ...


4

There are several allegations and studies which suggest that cinnamon does or may help regulate insulin levels in diabetics. However the American Diabetes Society disagrees, saying, Cinnamon cannot replace medication, a healthy diet, and exercise for people with diabetes who are trying to prevent serious heart problems. A balanced summary might be this ...


3

At this point we don't have any studies to confirm the benefit of lemon juice with honey on reducing visceral fat. There are a couple of studies on using honey alone including this one which found improved diabetic control in rats: Glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey also significantly reduced the elevated levels of creatinine, bilirubin, ...


2

In another short: be careful with an unconditional "yes". There are differences in honeys and conditions. Honey can be a very effective treatment for a number of superficial wounds. And that is not only reported in recent medical publications but also ancient – wisdom. But not all honeys are created equal. Your first link goes to a site from New Zealand. ...


1

Per Cooper and Jenkins in 2012, good reasons to consider using honey produced from the Leptospermum scoparium (manuka) plant from New Zealand clinically as an alternative to conventional antimicrobials are lack of selection of honey-resistant mutants and lack of cytotoxicity. However per the authors, comparison of manuka honey with antimicrobials mupirocin ...


1

well its true in a way.... But the original concoction is called Panchamrita ( cos it has 5 things added ). Yogurt and honey do form large portions. sugar the least...and milk and ghee ( clarified butter ) are also added. honey, sugar, milk, yogurt, and ghee http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panchamrita This is the food of the gods.....cos it is used during ...


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