216

The study that the company uses to prove that "scalar waves" give human skin the ability to "neutralize" UV rays is bunk, for a multitude of reasons. Instead of commenting on the existence of scalar waves and their purported ability to block UV rays, I investigated their own website to determine what their proof of this supposed finding was. Scrolling down ...


134

This statement is only true if you heavily distort the meaning of the word "positive". The following are quotes from the abstract of all four meta-analyses the article claimed are positive: At the moment the evidence of clinical trials is positive but not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions because most trials are of low methodological quality ...


75

In addition to the other excellent answers, which already show that the product is not to be trusted, I'd like to point out two more reasons why one should be worried about the "research" being presented. Firstly I'd like to point out that the article is not published, thus, not peer reviewed. While it might look like actual research, it's just a pdf that ...


60

While anything is possible, there is absolutely no reason to believe these claims, mostly because the claims don't make any sense scientifically. "Scalar waves" is a meaningless term, as claimed to have been applied here. It is a theoretical construct that exists in quantum theory, and the idea that they could imprint it in some sort of permanent, fixed ...


26

The claim is loosely worded, but a reasonable interpretation is that there are only five systematic reviews (otherwise, the whole point of avoiding cherry-picking a study is negated). This meta-meta review found eleven independent reviews, and found "Collectively they implied that the overall positive result of this meta-analysis is not supported by a ...


18

Long comment - Wrote this before I had commenting privileges. Homeopathy most certainly does not work, except as a placebo. You linked to an article in The Guardian, written by Rachel Roberts. Click her bio on The Guardian, and what'd you know, she's a 'professional homeopath': Rachel Roberts is a professional homeopath, who qualified in 1997, and a ...


17

tl;dr- The collection of claims about "Harmonized Water" appear to be incoherent gibberish which prevents us from falsifying them ("not even wrong"). If this were a real product, a common chemistry lab device (UV spectrometer) could've easily demonstrated its ability to block UV rays. EDIT: Reference (9) from the PDF on "Harmonized Water" appears to ...


13

The WHO's position on alternative medicine seems to be the same as their position on conventional medicine: if it is proven to work and proven to be safe, go ahead and use it. The document you linked was published in 2013 and outlines the WHO's general strategy and position regarding alternative medicines, though they tend to refer to them as traditional ...


11

This Indian Institute of Technology Bombay press release quotes some research papers This isn't really true. It is just one research paper, and one comment on said research paper. Also, it merely describes the paper, without quoting it. In any case, a major finding of the first paper is that there are discrete metal particles in the mixture. In other ...


11

It was me who asked the question on the Gandhitopia forum that you found. I have also been unable to find a source for the quote the homeopaths attribute to Gandhi. However, as you could see, I found those quotes from his letters recorded in what appears to be a reliable source (http://www.gandhiserve.org/), but they tend to indicate he was not a fan (the ...


10

Short answer: No this paper does not prove homeopathy works. It certainly has the form of a scientific paper but frankly appears to be obsfucatory and/or trivial. The vast majority of the paper is about demonstrating that lots of variations in experimental methodology do not introduce confounding effects. The experiment is looking at whether or not using ...


10

Yes, according to Health Canada, Canada's department of public health, lyssin/lyssinnum is sourced from the saliva of rabid dogs, and seems to be intended for pets and not people. Thankfully for everyone involved, it seems like it is just as ineffective as any other homeopathic product. Health Canada Source: Here is Health Canada's information regarding '...


10

Disclaimer: I'm not your doctor, and further, I'm not any kind of doctor. Talk to one before you make medical decisions. However, I do have scientific and research training, and can assess the quality of the scientific evidence on this question. There does not appear to be any current evidence for the effectiveness of Tonsilotren in treating any condition. ...


10

It really doesn't make any difference if the water is boiled or not, homeopathy doesn't work. The Minimum Dose and Avagadro's Number The second and most controversial tenet in homeopathy is that remedies retain biological activity if they are diluted in a series (usually in a 1:10 or 1:100 diluent–volume ratio) and agitated or shaken between each ...


9

UK Universities have taught homeopathy While some universities have since moved away from teaching Homeopathy and other pseudo-sciences, David Colquhoun's Improbable Science Blog documented a few examples in the UK around 2008. This story was picked up by The Times. Compiled by trawling the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service and university ...


6

I think the claim is technically true but misleading. In 1997 Klaus Linde et al did a meta analysis to answer that question titled "Are the clinical effects of homoeopathy placebo effects? A meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials". In their literature review they find: The combined odds ratio for the 89 studies entered into the main meta-analysis ...


6

I found this excellent summary of one person's investigation into the "Gandhi supported homeopathy" claim. It appears to be totally bogus. http://evidenceplease.net/tag/gandhi-homeopathy-quote/ Nevertheless, Gandhi had some pretty amazing ideas about healthcare. The pro-homeopathy myth might have started because he was a BIG supporter of water-cures. ...


5

First of all, I don't see how this is considered "homeopathic" because it is sold in 1X concentration. This means that the active ingredient is 10% concentrated and thus the drug works like any other herbal product. Secondly, the plant itself is known for its medicinal properties as an antiseptic - and not as a skin irritant as homeopathy would need it. ...


4

The article is formally correct in its statements (four of these five reviews indeed say that), but it is either deliberately misleading or abysmally researched, and written by someone lacking professional knowledge (or, both). It took me 20 seconds on Medline to find another four systematic reviews (although in the Guardian author's defense, three of them ...


3

In the United States, the manufacture of homeopathic "remedies" is covered by Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP) regulations for Finished Pharmaceuticals, Title 21, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 210 and 211, and is regulated by the US Food and Drugs Administration. In a warning letter to one homeopathy manufacturer the FDA explained: The ...


3

Since you are looking for results on a specific product the best that can be said is that the efficacy is unknown with some positive evidence, since there has been at least one study that used this specific product. Phase III Randomized Trial of Calendula Officinalis Compared With Trolamine for the Prevention of Acute Dermatitis During Irradiation for ...


2

Boneset cannot 'cure' dengue fever, but it can certainly help. The Eupatorium genus is enormous, and a matter of some debate, but definitely contains the plants commonly known as boneset and feverwort, among other names. Boneset was probably never used to cure broken bones, as the literature supporting its use by indigenous peoples shows its use as an anti-...


1

Lyssinum is made from a rabies "nosode" 1. A nosode in homeopathy refers to a sample from a diseased animal or person 2. This doesn't really give us enough information to say that it was specifically saliva from specifically a rabid dog, but it is at the very least not too far from the truth as claimed by the producers of the 'remedy'. Note that this doesn'...


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