Hot answers tagged

129

No, walls predate wheels by several millenia. The invention of the wheel is generally placed at around 3500-4500 BCE. However walls were famously built around the town of Jericho in 8000-9000BCE, so they are at least that old. More information can be found here: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2019/01/10/president-trump-is-wheel-older-than-...


106

According to this article (French), there has never been such a law in French codes, but the rumor is persistent over time. It seems that it all come from the censorship of George Orwell's Animal Farm, censored for its first publication in France in 1947; the pig originally named Napoléon was finally renamed Cesar. In 1945, an Englishman, George Orwell, ...


105

No. It is a complete invention of an urban myth. Unless anybody produces a Royal Navy document that even does any mention of this influence of Coriolis effect, this seems to be just untrue. A complete fabrication for a good story – good for teaching physics but very bad history. It seems to be an annoying urban myth. The Coriolis effect is present and ...


102

The factory owners certainly did not start the habits of English workers to drink their tea with milk to speed up the breaks. That is a bogus claim incompatible with recorded history. Perhaps there were a few factory owners that made the observation that tea cooling faster might reduce time spent on breaks and thus wanted their workers to add milk in any ...


102

It is entirely possible that Hitler said something of the sort, although it is rather a stretch to say it is about homeschooling. The law making school attendance compulsory was actually passed in 1919 as part of the Weimar constitution. Wikipedia: The Weimar Constitution Section 4: Education and School Articles 142 to 150 guided the operation of ...


94

Overall, this is a mixture of true, false, and unverifiable claims. First things first: I'm going into this highly skeptical, because part of the claim being made is extreme to me. The OP writes, Prominent detractors, including scientists and journalists went missing or were found dead, in horrific circumstances. One’s body was found in a terrible ...


90

According to the 1991 book Horrendous Death and Health: Toward Action : Brown University students took significant action in 1984, before the Cold War thawing. The students voted to have the campus health center stock cyanide pills so they could easily commit suicide in the event of a nuclear war and according to a Brown University webpage: On ...


85

The 1930 measurement was taken incorrectly. The claim was also made in domestic newspapers at the time, including L'Express du Midi: 50° AU SOLEIL A SAINT-ETIENNE Saint-Etienne, 27 août. Le thermomètre a marqué aujourd'hui 50° au soleil. Mme Guilly, 40 ans, est morte frappée d'insolation. A rough translation of this is 50° IN THE SUN IN SAINT-...


80

This is something of an urban myth - the drying time gains were made by using oven-dried enamel coatings on the parts that could withstand the required curing temperatures. The so-called "baked enamel" coating used by Ford was called "Japan Black" (produced for Ford by APV Engineered Coatings) - this is an asphalt-based enamel coating which is applied to ...


75

When? If you go back far enough, it's likely... The data collected by Tietze showed 2,677 deaths from abortion in 1933... ...and then maybe... ...compared with 888 in 1945, with much of the decline in septic cases associated with illegal abortions. (The numbers also include deaths from "therapeutic abortions," permitted by law, and "spontaneous ...


68

It seems unlikely. While this claim was widely copied, it derived from a single source in the espionage community: Thomas C. Reed in At the Abyss: An Insider's History of the Cold War. There was no confirmation from other sources. The book Cybercrime explains: […] Reed's book is the only public mention of the incident and his account relied on a single ...


65

True. There are two claims to address: Is the quote real? Does it apply to home-schooling? Hitler did say that. It does also apply to home-schooling. It was the general principle of national-socialist education plans. He said the quote in a more general context than for example as a reply to 'what do you think of home-schooling.' In that sense, Hitler ...


63

Notice: This answer addresses revision 3 of the question. It seems quite nonsensical, as there were 'white' people in Virginia at the time. The European settlers from England would count as 'white' today? That is 'white' in the racist sense of people of light skin tone (which arguably is not white (rgb(255, 255, 255)) but rosy/pinky/pale, whatever you'd ...


51

No, not really. They were making a dramatic and hyperbolic gesture about the dangers of nuclear holocaust, but they were not seriously hoping to have pills handy for use. In any event, organizers say their aim is largely symbolic: they want people to equate nuclear war with suicide. "There are words we hear talk about when people mention nuclear war: ...


45

This article covers the history, including representative statistics. This paper provides some more statistics. The key quotation is: In 1940 there were 1407 abortion-related deaths (excluding spontaneous abortions). By 1966 there were 160 abortion-related deaths, an 89% decline that took place before any state had passed less restrictive abortion laws. ...


37

Avery's answer is very thorough and well-researched; go read it. I'm going to address a relatively narrow portion of the claim here: They MURDERED [...] journalists The Committee to Protect Journalists publishes data on journalists who die under mysterious or violent circumstances, and makes that data available in a nice interactive webpage for filtering ...


35

Rudolph Verner, the gunnery officer of the Inflexible, which took part in the battle, wrote a short set of notes about the successes and difficulties encountered during the engagement. He writes Deflection caused considerable difficulty, and on two occasions one gun fired some five or six consecutive rounds nearly a ship's length astern of the target. ...


29

tl;dr As commonly understood, the claim is a bit exaggerated by a few hundred years. They had iron artefacts at the time and a few resemble weapons. This cannot be regarded as widespread use of weapons made from meteoric iron at the time 3000BCE. Wikipedia lists the famous Tutankhamun's meteoric iron dagger No Egyptian archaeological evidence ...


29

Haven't yet located an actual school book from that time. But this is in line with old territorial claims of China, thus not really tying this "tradition" to either Tibet or "Red China" (Nationalist Republic of China aka Taiwan did and does the same)or 1951: Joseph Newman: "A New Look at Red China" Washington: U.S. News & World Report, 1971. (...


26

This appears to be a folk tale with little contemporary evidence of the event actually happening, but the tale itself does seem to date to the 15th century. According to Volume 17 of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica, the tale is told in a few ways: MACAIRE, a French chanson de geste. Macaire (12th century) and La reine Sibille (14th century) are two ...


25

According to 1670-Enquiries to the Governor of Virginia from the Lords Commissioners of Foreign Plantations. Answered by Sir William Berkeley in 1671 (alternative source, see page 515) What number of planters, servants and slaves; and how many parishes are there in your plantation? Answer. We suppose, and I am very sure we do not much ...


19

"Space" and "visible" are poorly defined, but the broad question has been widely addressed already. Can you see it from the Moon, with a naked eye? No: NASA "The only thing you can see from the Moon is a beautiful sphere, mostly white, some blue and patches of yellow, and every once in a while some green vegetation," said Alan Bean, Apollo 12 astronaut....


18

There is no reason to doubt that Churchill explicitly mentioned Rolls-Royce in the context of the quote. A Google Books search limited to books published before 1960 returns at least four publications that feature the Churchill quote including the Rolls-Royce reference: Jackson, G. G. (1930). The world's aeroplanes and airships, p. 173. IPC Transport ...


17

The numbers of deaths in the concentrations camps differ in quality for 'white' and 'black' internees. For black and coloured: What records there are show that 115,700 were interned, slightly more than half of those in Orange River Colony, as it was known at the time, and the rest in Transvaal. The records also show that 14,154 died, over 80 per cent of ...


17

Actually the most distinctive papal headgear, the one that popes used to be drawn wearing in political cartoons to distinguish them from ordinary bishops, is what is called the papal tiara, a tall conical shape with three crowns around it, one above the other. Of course the popes have rarely wore the papal tiara in the last fifty years or so, so younger ...


16

According to Cut Bronze Coins in the Ancient Near East in Actes Du XIe Congrès International de Numismatique: The cutting in half of bronze coins to make change is a well known phenomenon in ancient times. In the West, the practice began in Sicily late in the 3rd century B.C. with the halving of the Poseidon/trident bronzes of Hieron II of Syracuse (c....


16

Few sources stress Francis-Ferdinand’s passion for hunting. Yet he scoured the globe for species to kill with a zeal that far exceeded the social demands of his day. He was an early adept of the machine-gun, and would have all the animals of the forest driven into his sights. Two of his trips to Poland sufficed to bring the European bison to the point of ...


12

Obama is not the first sitting US president to publish an academic journal article. In September 1897, William McKinley (25th) published an article in the American Annals of the Deaf. The American Annals of the Deaf is a professional journal dedicated to quality in education and related services for deaf or hard of hearing children and adults. First ...


12

Roger has found the article in question by Leibowitz. I think the passage that Solzhenitsyn is referring to is on the top of page 160: The prisoners at Krukovd [the prison which Leibowitz visited] are not a burden to the government, as they are in our country, because in Russia they earn and pay for their own keep. [...] The result of this whole program ...


12

There is little doubt that the cold water was deadly to many of the victims in the Titanic desaster. The figure given in the Wikipedia article, that "most people who entered the −2°C (28°F) water died in 15–30 minutes" is certainly plausible. However, note the word "most": the quote doesn't state how many lived longer than 30 minutes, but there must have ...


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